A Strategy to Fight Digital Disinformation: Digital Communicators Network

3 minutes read time
Assistant Secretary Royce delivers remarks at the Digital Communications Network Influencers Forum in Greece.
Assistant Secretary Royce delivers remarks at the Digital Communications Network Influencers Forum in Greece.

A Strategy to Fight Digital Disinformation: Digital Communicators Network

Last week in Thessaloniki, Greece, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs sponsored the Digital Communicators Network (DCN) Influencers Forum, teaching frontline communicators tactics to push back against disinformation. I had the pleasure of addressing the forum and met with many of the attendees during my visit, which coincided with the 83rd Thessaloniki International Fair at which the United States was the “honored country.” 

Comprising more than 5,000 digital professionals from 30 countries, the DCN connects journalists, communications specialists, and opinion leaders who understand the importance of working collectively to support independent journalism and freedom of expression.

The Department of State formed the DCN in 2016 to support digital diplomacy and provide tools to combat digital disinformation. As social media continues to change the face of traditional media, it presents more opportunities to reach new audiences and engage in two-way conversations. Through the DCN, tools and resources are provided to support the creation and verification of accurate news globally. 

As I told the audience in Greece: “Digital technologies give us the tools to achieve both media accountability and transparency as well as an active and well-informed society. This is why the work of the Digital Communications Network is so vitally important. It brings together the brightest minds that see technology as a vehicle for positive change.”

A pillar of democratic society and governance, freedom of press and expression – at home and abroad – is crucial to sustaining democracy around the world. Our role is to help frontline communicators understand their special responsibility to hold governments accountable, ask difficult questions of public leaders, and provide balanced information from reliable sources. The mechanisms shared at the DCN ensure communicators identify accurate information to support free, fair, and fact-based speech.

About the Author: Marie Royce serves as Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Editor's Note: This entry also appears in the U.S. Department of State's publication on Medium.