State Department Kicks-Off Global Partnerships Week

Posted by Andrew O’Brien
March 9, 2015
The Capitol, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and others buildings in Washington, DC

The best ideas are never bound by borders, relegated to singular institutions, or time-limited. They are the start of a conversation rather than the end. And they have the capacity to transform our greatest challenges into opportunity.

That is the core principal behind public-private partnerships, recognizing that the best ideas require coordination and collaboration across industries, communities and ideologies.  Working with partners across sectors, industries, and borders better positions us to leverage our shared creativity, innovation, and core business resources, thus strengthening U.S. diplomacy and development around the world.

In embracing that theme, this week, the U.S. Department of State in collaboration with Concordia and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) kicks-off its annual Global Partnerships Week (GPW).  Held in March of each year, GPW inspires public and private organizations everywhere through local, national and global activities designed to help them explore their potential as shared value collaborators.  

This year, there are 18 registered GPW events scheduled around the world. Ranging large-scale activities to intimate networking gatherings these events will connect governments, companies, civil society organizations, faith-based organizations, diaspora communities, and academic institutions to explore new and exciting opportunities to create global change.  The 2015 events include a live online discussion hosted by Business Fights Poverty, the Fish 2.0 South Pacific Workshop in Fiji, an evening reception to open the USAID Regional Development Mission for Asia in Bangkok, and Sister Cities International’s 2015 Diplomatic Gala in Washington.

This week, the second iteration of the ‘State of Global Partnership Report’ will also be released, highlighting 12 innovative partnerships that address global challenges and coordinate on collaborative solutions.

About the Author: Andrew O'Brien serves as the Special Representative for Global Partnerships at the U.S. Department of State.

Follow the conversation online using #GPW2015 and keep up with the Special Representative @DrewAtState and other GPW partners on twitter @GPatState, @USAID, and @ConcordiaSummit.

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Comments

Jane F.
|
United States
March 10, 2015

This pile of obfuscatory verbiage is just a smokescreen. The policy of the US Department of State over the past 15 years has been to suppress economic development throughout the world, in a futile attempt to maintain the supremacy of the bankrupt Anglo-Saxon empire of speculative finance. The future of the world lies with the magnificent infrastructure plans being put forward by the BRICS nations. But the present British and American leadership will go to war in order to prevent that future from coming to fruition. This is an unforgivable betrayal of the vision of America's founders.

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