Attack in Paris

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 7, 2015
Secretary Kerry Comments on the Attack in Paris

Following the attack at the office of Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris, President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry condemned the attack and underscored U.S. solidarity with France, America's oldest ally.

"I would like to say directly to the people of Paris and of all of France that each and every American stands with you today, not just in horror or in anger or in outrage for this vicious act of violence, though we stand with you in solidarity and in commitment both to the cause of confronting extremism and in the cause which the extremists fear so much and which has always united our two countries:  freedom," Secretary Kerry said.

 

"...Today, tomorrow, in Paris, in France, or across the world, the freedom of expression that this magazine, no matter what your feelings were about it, the freedom of expression that it represented is not able to be killed by this kind of act of terror.  On the contrary; it will never be eradicated by any act of terror.  What they don’t understand -- what these people who do these things don’t understand -- is they will only strengthen the commitment to that freedom and our commitment to a civilized world."

Secretary Kerry then delivered a message in French to the people of France.  You can watch the video of his remarks in French below, and his comments in English here.

"Time and again, the French people have stood up for the universal values that generations of our people have defended," President Obama said in a statement.  "France, and the great city of Paris where this outrageous attack took place, offer the world a timeless example that will endure well beyond the hateful vision of these killers. We are in touch with French officials and I have directed my Administration to provide any assistance needed to help bring these terrorists to justice."

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Comments

Ed R.
|
United States
January 7, 2015
Terrorists, we can all agree, are merely selfish, purposely cultivated bullies exhibiting their cowardice by resorting to violent acts because they are incapable of dealing directly and in a civil matter with rational human beings.
Marie M.
|
Oregon, USA
January 7, 2015
Thank you for your support of the French and this horrible attack in Paris today. I heard a French national say how comforting it was for you to speak French and I applaud your ability to connect with their country in this way, unlike many US citizens who won't try a new language. I study beginning French at Alliance Francaise in portland OR and feel closer to this event with my new knowledge of the language and culture. Please continue to express the condolences of the US population, myself and my family. Marie Martin, NP
ali b.
|
Lebanon
January 8, 2015
we stand with france against terror
Gus H.
|
Kentucky, USA
January 8, 2015
Obama could take advice on Islam from Winston Churchill. He had it pegged 75 years ago when he said: "How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries, improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement, the next of its dignity and sanctity.
Maureen V.
|
Massachusetts, USA
January 8, 2015
Tristesse pour la France. Such particular responsibility to balance religion, freedom of presse and security. My humble comment is that we must start to further analyze socioeconomic and educational disparities within the younger population as sources of potential resentment. Had these young men been successful earlier on would the outcome be the same?
Rose B.
|
United States
January 10, 2015
And yet, when over 40 Ukrainians were burned alive by terrorists in Odessa last May, the State Department seemed oddly ambivalent. Where was the indignation then?
Eric J.
|
New Mexico, USA
January 26, 2015

If terrorists target the underpinnings of liberty in an effort to instil fear in order to silence civilization; I am watching their utter strategic failure live on C-span this morning as all of France has taken to the streets along with world leaders to deliver a simple message by the people, for the people, and of the people that humanity will not be intimidated.

This isn't so much a response to an attack on freedom of speech, but at its core is a reafirmation that the people are determined to live with freedom from fear itself.

We can do this, so long as we remember our joy.

EJ 1/11/15

Eric J.
|
New Mexico, USA
January 26, 2015

Addendum to Charlie,

I once thought that my education into politics really began with Watergate, but as a child I was always looking at the Sunday Paper's funny pages and I guess my knowledge of what was going on in the world of adults really began by looking at the political cartoons of Bill Mauldin and a guy named Oliphant....and I must credit them for having helped develop my sense of humor at a young age. I'm not sure satire has lent impetus to my having a better life, but it did pose an invitation to think about it.

Folks will make a political stew over just about anything they can make seem controversial. And political cartoons serve a premeditated purpose. As Bill Mauldin once said, "If you see a stuffed shirt, poke it. If it is really stuffed, punch it."

Depiciting Mohammed as a cartoon charater in satirical humor therefore cannot be held as blasphemous by those who commit gross atrocities in his name and are themselves apostates of his teachings. The average peace loving Muslim should not be offended by the cartoons, but by the apostetes that inspire them to be drawn in the first place and published in order to inspire people to think. They don't have to be Charlie to understand that being Charlie is all about being who you aspire to be in life and expressing one's self without living in fear.

Folks are trying to drum up controversy when millions gather to rally along with world leaders and the leader of the free world doesn't attend...but it begs the question; whether he is free enough to when the Secret Service couldn't possibly have secured the rout of the march any better than the French had already done by popular demand and their own free will.

Can't exactly hold it against the Secret Service for living in fear...that's in their job description,..so the President doesn't have to. Thing is, the whole point of Sunday's rally in Paris was millions of folks telling terrorist that they arn't going to be living in fear of idiots that have no sense of humor.

I personally think it would have been good if the President and First Lady had been there. No huge entorage, a half dozen folks for security would have been enough if French security was deemed adequate, as it was apparently for all the other world leaders including thier President.

But as to folks in this country saying the Sec of State or Pres. Obama intentionally & snubbed; the French for not being there ..I can only conclude that's just the flatulance of stuffed shirts; talkin.heads chasing their political coat-tails.

My advice to the French people is not to think of this attack as your 9/11;, but as a wake up call to get serious about being in a state of war with terrorists, in order to prevent a French 9/11 when some idiots take it upon their terrorist selves to fly a passenger jet into the Eiffel tower. 

EJ 1/14/15

Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
January 14, 2015
Terrorist are people that don't have Affordable Healthcare. Ask Boehner about his bartender , we need to get these people medical healthcare. The Republicans better pass something, or help fix what we have soon. Instead of saying it doesn't work.. ;)
Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
January 15, 2015
Terrorist and the guy who plotted too kill Boehner, are emotional unstable people that need medical treatment. If you cut someone's head off you must be in need of medical help, because that is crazy! And if you think your Jesus and Boehner is Satan, or the US is Satan you need Medical help ....Because that is Crazy too....
Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
January 15, 2015
If you think about it, terrorist do have a lot in common with Boehner's bartender, they are both crazy, and plot to kill people. We just need too build a big padded room for them, and give them lots of medication until they feel better. ;)
Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
January 16, 2015
ISIL is a loony tune group of nut jobs that need mental healthcare provide for them from a nice padded room with a TV playing the Wizard of OZ and lots of medication ... :)

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