Creating an AIDS-Free Generation Through Science and Technology

Posted by David Stanton
February 13, 2014
HIV Test Conducted in Zimbabwe

Last year, the United States government provided testing and counseling for more than 57 million people through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The program enrolled more than four million men in voluntary medical circumcision programs and supported more than five million orphans and vulnerable children in countries with some of the highest rates of HIV and AIDS. These are just a few of the remarkable achievements that PEPFAR has made over the past decade—a small testament to the hard work of so many who are committed to and work tirelessly every day to achieve an AIDS-free generation. These great achievements, however, would not be possible without inspiring advances in science and technology.

For the first time, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) -- through its Office of Science and Technology -- has created an awards program that embodies the agency’s commitment to supporting innovation in science and technology applications. The Pioneers Prize pays tribute to technological advances that offer innovative solutions to critical issues facing global development. By utilizing science, technology and innovation, USAID is working toward its mission to end extreme poverty and promote resilient democratic societies.

As a key implementer of PEPFAR, USAID’s work in HIV and AIDS was well-recognized with this year’s Pioneer Prizes. Awarded three grand prizes, the Office of HIV/AIDS, along with its partners, has been able to share the transformative nature of its work with the rest of the global health and development community.  Among the grand prize winners is the Delivery Team Topping Up (DTTU) program, which uses vendor-managed inventory principles to “top up” supplies, such as condoms and HIV test kits, at public health facilities. To date, the program has serviced 1,800 clinics in Zimbabwe.

The PLACE Method, also a recipient, applies new technologies in HIV and STI testing, spatial mapping, epidemiologic theory and empiric evidence to address the problem of obtaining valid information that can prevent the spread of infections in sex workers and injecting drug users. It targets geographic areas with high rates of infection and the venues where people at high-risk meet. It then uses low-cost GPS receivers and Google Earth to identify gaps in prevention programs.

Finally, Tenofovir gel, a vaginally applied antiretroviral microbicide used to prevent HIV infection, gives women an alternative method to keep themselves safe during unprotected sex. Tested in the CAPRISA 004 trial, Tenofovir gel reduced HIV acquisition by an estimated 39 percent overall and by 54 percent in women with high gel adherence. While still awaiting the results of an ongoing confirmatory trial, regulatory approval, and scale-up, the CAPRISA 004 trial demonstrated for the first time that a microbicide has the potential to drastically reduce HIV infection for women.

With these awarded innovations, it is clear that USAID’s work toward HIV and AIDS prevention through PEPFAR remains essential to achieving our mission of ending extreme poverty. With the commitment, innovative spirit, creativity and hard work of our partners, USAID is continuously using science and technology in unprecedented ways to make great strides toward an AIDS-free generation.

About the Author: David Stanton serves as the Director of the Office of HIV/AIDS at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Editor's Note: This entry originally appeared on the USAID Impact Blog

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