Conversations With America: Making Foreign Policy Less Foreign

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
May 2, 2013
Conversations With America: Making Foreign Policy Less Foreign

Michael Hammer, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Public Affairs, will be interviewed by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, to discuss the Department of State's communication efforts. The conversation will highlight the importance of engaging the American public to advance the Department's work at home and abroad. The discussion will be available for on-demand viewing soon on YouTube and www.state.gov.

You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the taping on May 9. Submit your questions below on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog, and join the ongoing discussion via Twitter using the hashtag #askPA. Please submit questions via DipNote and Twitter as soon as possible for consideration.

View other Conversations with America here and by accessing the Conversations with America video podcasts on iTunes.

Comments

Comments

Melaku l.
|
New Jersey, USA
May 2, 2013

Melaku L. in New Jersey writes:

Democracy and human freedoms are core American values. Let us applly them universally all of the world. Ethiopia is the country that needs you attention. Many jounalists languish in preson becuaxue they spoke the truth.Help them, please, so that others raise their voices for freedom and democrcy

victor L.
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Panama
May 2, 2013

Victor L. in Panama writes:

Please try for Inmigration: Quality and not Quantity.

second: don't bring enemies to the USA

Reza C.
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Maryland, USA
May 2, 2013

Reza C. in Maryland writes:

1. What is the US Department of State doing to engage young people in the US and aboard to cultivate positive impression of the US?

2. Are there any resources available to have American academicians helping struggling academic institutions abroad?

3. What is the US Department of State doing to help the youth of the world to hope for a better and brighter future for themselves and the world?

Ben
|
California, USA
May 2, 2013

Ben in California writes:

Here are some questions for the interview:

1. Why does the U.S. opposed Al-Qaeda and related groups when they are attacking the U.S., but support them when they are attacking Syria, Russia, or the former government of Libya? Has there been any discussion of reconsidering this approach?

2. The government of Saudi Arabia is known to be the chief funding agency for Al-Qaeda and Salafist/Wahhabist militant groups of all kinds. Under the circumstances, why does the U.S. Department of State maintain such friendly relations with the Saudi regime? Did the State Department approve of the decision to extend "trusted traveler" status to Saudi nationals? Why is the 28 page section of the 911 Commission Report which deals with Saudi government support for the 911 hijackers still classified?

Sidney C.
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Michigan, USA
May 2, 2013

Sidney C. in Michigan writes:

Why cannot we develop Public Private Partnerships with collaborators in Less Developed Countries? An investment with a Return On Investment could be favorable to the governments, non profits (university and tax exempts) as well as for profit businesses that yield a tax revenue and a fair profit can provide a means to expand.

Howard M.
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Georgia, USA
May 3, 2013

Howard M. in Georgia (U.S.A.) writes:

What is the SD doing to assure young Muslims already in the US and those about to arrive, are made to feel welcome and that their assimilation into the American culture is facilitated? I am thinking of the feelings of alienation and failure one of the Boston bombers seemed to feel.

Shannon L.
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Sweden
May 3, 2013

Shannon L. in Sweden writes:

What exactly is the new office of Global Health Diplomacy going to do and how does it play a role in foreign policy?

Liz E.
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District Of Columbia, USA
May 3, 2013

Liz in Washington, D.C. writes:

Building buy-in for foreign policy spending during what some call a budget "crisis" is difficult. There are false claims that America spends 20% or more on foreign aid, for example, when in reality the U.S. spends less than 1/2 of 1%. How do you work to dispel myths about the real cost of and the real impact of foreign-spending?

Patrick H.
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California, USA
May 3, 2013

Patrick H. in California writes:

If the U.S. govt. could convince Israel to not destroy any homes or infrastructure in the West Bank following an agreement with the Palestinians, then the Palestinians would come back to the Peace Table. Not like what happened in Gaza.

Godwin F.
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Nigeria
May 3, 2013

Godwin F. in Nigeria writes:

We Nigeria will be eligible or not, secondly the Diversity Visa Lottery when will it be stop permanently

Clayton S.
|
Delaware, USA
May 3, 2013

Clayton S. in Delaware writes:

The US and the Caribbean have long standing relationship in diplomacy, trade, hemispheric security, aid, war on drugs etc.. Notwithstanding over the last decade and after the end of the"cold war" US influence in the Caribbebabn has declined significantly the vacuum now being filled by Venezuela, Cuba and China..Each of these countries have resident Ambbassadors on the island of Dominica .and for example for visitor and other visa applicdations Dominican citizens must fly to Barbados , book hotel , meet taxi transportation and other costs...stand in a long line..with the possibility of the application being rejected ..Seems unfair and expensive. Can the State Dept do something positive coming out of .. Conversations With America: Making Foreign Policy Less Foreign ..about the situation in countries in the Underbelly of the US

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
May 4, 2013

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Well we generally think of foreign policy (as conjunct to domestic policy) as being outside our national boarders, when in fact all policy (or politics for that matter) are "local" and thus one has to properly define the notion of "foreign" when trying to engage in common human understanding on the policy level.

So my question to Mr. Hammer is, how do you put policy into "plain speak" rather than "diplo-speak"?

Do you do away with all acronyms for starters, being that most folks probably don't know the difference between an FTO and a FTA?

If a citizen were to ask you (and I'm asking) if what I'm witness to in Syria constitutes genocide on the part of Assad's government? Would you be able to answer that with a definitive "yes" or "no" and eleaborate on how you came to your conclusion logicly, having evolved over time on behalf of this government, by , for, and of its citizens?

Thanks for taking this question, there's nothing "foreign" about what is taking place, we've witnessed it all too often on this planet. Only by defining a common human understanding of it can one hope to put a stop to it.

Jean K.
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May 4, 2013

Jean Claude K. writes:

First question. Talking about the conflict between Israel and the Paslestinians, it is clear that America has notyet been successful in resolving it; are you confident that someday you will be able to resolve it? Second question. What are you planning to do with the many information at your desk concerning the old Jews relocated in Africa Cameroon, and the knowledge that America and no country in the world will be able to solve the Israeli-Palestinians crises without taking into consideration the old Jews in Cameroun, thanks a lot for any attempt to providing responses.

Mark S.
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United States
May 8, 2013
All country development activities are dependent on physical infrastructure to be successful. Whether health, agriculture, education, democratization, or other initiative, the need for transportation, water, power, buildings, flood control, and other such infrastructure is undeniable. U.S. engineering firms are the quality standard for designing and managing the creation of high performing and sustainable infrastructure, but are infrequently used by U.S. development agencies. How can this industry perform a greater role in making U.S. diplomatic and development activities successful?
Mark S.
|
United States
May 8, 2013
We understand that the most effective way to balance diplomatic and development activities that will ensure strong partnerships and promote stability, is through economic growth. Leaving behind tangible evidence of infrastructure such as roads, schools, health clinics and water sanitation plants supports our objectives and foreign policy abroad in very measurable ways. How can the US engineering and construction industry better strengthen its efforts and resources to more fully participate in the economic growth in these regions?

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