Join a Discussion on Youth and Global Engagement

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
April 9, 2013
The Next Level of Diplomacy: Youth and Global Engagement

The U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Public Affairs and the United Nations Foundation will be hosting a panel discussion entitled "The Next Level of Diplomacy: Youth and Global Engagement." The event will feature Farah Pandith, Special Representative to Muslim Communities, U.S. Department of State; Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation; and Zeenat Rahman, Special Adviser for Global Youth Issues, U.S. Department of State. The panelists will discuss the importance of engaging youth in global affairs to promote peace, social justice, and democracy.

You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the taping. Submit your questions below on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog, and join the ongoing discussion via Twitter using the hashtag #EngageYouth. Please submit questions via DipNote, Facebook, or Twitter as soon as possible for consideration.

The discussion will be available for on-demand viewing soon on YouTube and www.state.gov.

Related Content: Special Adviser Zeenat Rahman holds a Google+ Hangout with youth entrepreneurs in Egypt, Ghana, and the United States.

Comments

Comments

George A.
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Greece
April 10, 2013

George A. in Greece writes:

Honourable ladies, let me to share my thoughts to you as i live in South East Europe that located at the region of Balkans and Mediterranean sea. Personal i want good Israeli-Turkish, Greek-Turkish and Israeli-Greek relationships, guided geopolitical and financial by Germany and USA in order to build a strong alliance against the Iranian nuclear programme as this fundamentalistic state of Ahmadinejan and it's dangerous theocratic leaders threats the regions of Balkans, South Italy, Turkey, Israel and because the Iranian newclear gunshots could reach up there. We have to cancel all projects for the creation of a "great Kurdistan" if builded a financial "central Balkan" and "Medditeranean" uinion as part of a new European Union with capital city Washington (The empire of the Great West).

Hazrat K.
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Pakistan
April 10, 2013

Hazrat K. in Pakistan writes:

The students from middle class of the remote areas of the country like Balochistan and FATA,how he/she can expect from the US in regard his/her dream for higher education.it is only way to encounter the religious bigotry in the country and to build up positive opinions among people about US.furthermore the single student from entire community can divert the strong negative opinion to soft and positive opinions regarding US.

Alejandro A.
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Texas, USA
April 10, 2013

Alejandro A. in Texas writes:

With the epidemic of our future leaders and the generation that will shape the fabric of society in years to come I fell this is one of our most important issues. Is there some kind of plan to address the occupational orphaned of these times? Parents are forced to work long hours with less pay & our children are left to raise themselves. Developing a distorted view of the world. Then there are those who have been there street life & change there life because they see how delirious life like that is. These ate the people that can really connect with the youth. There are very intellectual youths that have been dealt a bad hand in life & can be pioneers if only they had someone that's been threw what they have to guide them. I know for a fact most in office never had the hardships of our youth today & the economy only perpetuates this cycle. Mabey I'm just a dreamer but I know America needs leaders & today youth & young adults are oblivious of the ways of the world. They know more about sports, cars, Facebook. And have no concept of sequesteration.

Richard B.
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Tennessee, USA
April 10, 2013

Richard B. in Tennessee writes:

I think it's important that we applaud the efforts of individual young people around the globe that have worked hard to make a mark in this discussion as well as to make note of those events and programs that have brought youth into the discussion. However, if we value the collective voice of youth in global diplomacy, what structural changes might we push for in our educational systems to encourage and facilitate the regular and widespread engagement of youth beyond micro-level initiatives?

Sayed K.
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Afghanistan
April 10, 2013

Sayad K. in Afghanistan writes:

For some people in Afghanistan, Youths are the only hopes for social justice and peace. How to create a paradigm shift for the developing nations to trust in youth’s engagement?

Katherine F.
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April 10, 2013

Katherine F. in North Carolina writes;

Should citizens be required by law to make certain mandatory donations to Goodwill, shelters, and other local government funded community building organizations every year depending on the tax bracket they belong to? Or be required to volunteer for or be part of community building organizations every year?

alanna d.
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Wisconsin, USA
April 10, 2013

Alanna D. in Wisconsin writes:

To whom it may concern: I have heard of the imprisoned preacher in Iran. How they fear not only him but his rightous religion. Perhaps if our nation said to them free him or be over run. Not with guns or tanks but with simple preachers, priests,those whose weapons are the lords words. If we threaten to fill the streets and alley's with the crashendo of the word. Perhaps they would release him. Even if many would die true martyers it would only fuel such a furvor that none could withstand it's power.

Kristyn G.
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New York, USA
April 10, 2013

Kristyn G. in New York writes:

As per the global media, the most widespread youth involvement in global affairs to promote peace, social justice, and democracy has been achieved through the actions of civil society, i.e. the Arab Spring and austerity protests throughout the Eurozone, in efforts to achieve ideals of social justice, democracy, and peace; what are international governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) currently doing, and how can they continue to create stronger relationships with civil society organizations in order to facilitate these initiatives for peace and change?

mohammad
|
April 10, 2013

Mohammad writes:

Do you have a basic plan that everyone can have a plan for peace on that basis, have? If yes, do you have plans to expand?

do you have an ability to create a subject that could be usefull for making a real family correlation in world nations and also could give warranty for every one for every groups and for every nations that they would have a private space in world size?

could you Utilize words with changing means for every Specifications mind ?

when you would find a plan for change world space to an environment with more tools and less applications for change and making ready world for peace ?

Riffat C.
|
Pennsylvania, USA
April 10, 2013

Riffat C. in Pennsylvania writes:

As we all keep chanting, "Children are our future", the question arises how much do we do for our children and Youth? A simple bill to ban assault weapons to protect our youth and children is taking so much effort and it is still not done!! Why are we cutting our mental health programs?

Ashim C.
|
India
April 11, 2013

Ashim C. in India writes:

Is not it true that biggest deterrant to youth participation in promoting peace, social justice and democracy is absence of their own national and international forum where they can articulate their views on issues which belong to domain of elders?

Why can't there be parallel youth bodies to G 8, G 20, EU, OIS, OAS, ASEAN SAARC etc where youths can discuss and propose solution to problems same problems which the orgonisations of elders deal in?

This would add new perspective, show why elders fail and progess so slowly and often don't represent the interest of future. There are experiments going on for youth participation through social media. These seemed so promising but in retrospect it appears they were manipulated, which is why mobilisations through social media have not led to desired objectives. Ms Zeenat Rehman what would be your comment on this situation and what initiative US is taking?

Kathryn M.
|
United States
April 11, 2013

Kathryn M. in the U.S.A. writes:

In academic literature published in books and journals worldwide, youth are commonly seen as "victims" or "perpetrators" of violence (McEvoy-Levy, 2006).

How do the Department of State and UN Foundation support all levels (from governments to community, grassroots institutions) worldwide, in reconceptualizing the role of youth from one with a predominantly negative connotation, to one with a positive connotation, such as youth serving as peacebuilders and active citizens in their multi-spheres? How do the Department of State and UN Foundation support and recognize youth-led initiatives worldwide?

From my experiences working domestically and in both Sub-Saharan Africa and the Pacific Region, as a young woman, myself, I see the possibilities for peace in the world largely surfacing from grassroots, youth movements that garner little attention from local or international media and little to no recognition from local to international government stakeholders; however, youth carry on in their important work, regardless, and continue to reconceptualize their own identities in society.

Olakunle D.
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Nigeria
April 18, 2013

Olakunle Olamide D. in Nigeria writes:

I think the best method need for the UN and even nations in the international system is that young personnel should be used in their diplomatic practices. It will help a great deal.

Jeff B.
|
New York, USA
April 18, 2013

Jeff B. in New York writes:

Do you have a basic plan that everyone can have a plan for peace on that basis, have? If yes, do you have plans to expand?

Good question my friend.

Marvin M.
|
Maryland, USA
April 18, 2013

Marvin M. in Maryland writes:

Some college friends of mine and I have been working on building a cross-cultural dialogue through sports for American students while they studying abroad called BridgeSport.

As you know,270,000 Americans study abroad every year. More & more of them are going to the BRICS & MENA region- a 6% increase in 2011. As young people with a global focus we see them as assets to our youth global engagement strategy.

What role do you feel this type of sports diplomacy should play in the future of fostering dialogue & building good-will between America and the world?

How can more young people studying abroad work with the State Department to report our global engagement?

PS In 8 months we have reached over 220 young people both American & Rome through Sports. Next semester we will be launching in 5 new cities.

Athieno M.
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Uganda
April 18, 2013

Athieno Lucy M. in Uganda writes:

Where are the youth in diplomacy???

Oduola J.
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April 18, 2013

Oduola Oluwaseun J. writes:

The events that happened in Tunisia, Egypt, Lybia, and which is now seen as the Arab Spring would not have occured if not for the roles played by the youths in that region.

The fact is this: that Arab Spring is nothing but the "springing up" of the youths in the Arab world, and there is no doubt that there are a lot of unsatisfied youths in other regions of the world ready to spring up if such an opportunity comes, not to cause chaos but to bring about positive change and development in the international system.

However, the so-called national interests of states tend to focus on the needs of the majority of the people that constitutes the adult population in the society, majorly in the developing world. Therefore, to what extent can youths be given places of authority and diplomatic responsibilities in this age of deocracy and public diplomacy?

Sincerely speaking, contemporary youths are seeing things from a more different and better perspective than the friends of Rehoboam.

Nwagwu C.
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April 18, 2013

Nwagwu Rich C. writes:

This discussion on diplomacy taking new dimension asides the 'formal' actors as ambassadors, foreign ministers, head of governments etc. Engagement of youths in matters relating to nation-states relations seems quite applauding.

The African continent is regarded as less-contributive to global issues on development because of its crawling state towards development which is a phenomenon sweeping throughout world societies especially in civilization. How is this new dimension of diplomacy going to capture the most of the African youths based on the believe system of most Africans that politics is not the concern of the youth and should be left to the political authoirities?

Which categories of youths are aimed to be captured? The African political society constitute averagely low youth; recognizing the level of cognitive and behavioural strength towards issues relating to peace and survival of the system (both locally and internationally.

Youths in this region of the world constitute tools and instruments for social unrest which has an adverse effect on states foreign relations. The Nigreian Boko Haram sect, the Libyan rebels in the Libyan Civil War, the Malian Political Crisis and other ideological fundamentalist groups who have risen arms against the state and threaten peace even on international organization as the bombing of the United Nations Secretariat in Nigeria.

What are the measures and strategies out for utilization to make for an integration of youths against old blocs and ideas that anchor some of their violent actions?

What has triggered the significance of youth in global engagements? What 'new' issues have recognized the importance of youth in foreign relations or engagements?

Betek M.
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Nigeria
April 18, 2013

Betek Chelsea M. in Nigeria writes:

Streaming from the evolution and development of diplomatic institutions and practices, what conceptual and operational framework or platform will take into consideration the integration of the youths and emerging generation of world leaders into a new diplomatic order with respect to the disparity in ideology, belief systems, thought processes, interests, policies... among others. Thanks.

Janssen V.
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Brazil
April 18, 2013

Janssen V. in Brazil writes:

Organizations have increasingly recognized the importance and high value of youth inputs and participation; however, many of them believe their work is too technical and that youth is inexperienced, or they simply do not know what/how to do. How could US Mission address these challenges and what can we as youth agents do to make our voice heard and help? Thank you.

Muhammed K.
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Uganda
April 18, 2013

Muhammed K. in Uganda writes:

The voices of young people from slum communities globally are seldom heard in decision making processes and in many arenas of public deliberation like this one. Specifically, there is limited space and opportunities for youth organisations and young people in urban poor settlements to 1. convene within civil society, 2. share practice even across borders, 3. Develop and advocate national policy issues together, 4. Pioneer new research, Improve youth involvement in decision making and public deliberation, 5. Channel new pathways for young leaders to develop skills and experience within CSOs

What can The U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Public Affairs and the United Nations Foundation do increase engagement of young people in the slum communities?

Muhammed K. *Slum Ambassador*, Bwaise Slums, Kampala Uganda

Harvey C.
|
Kentucky, USA
April 18, 2013

Harvey C. in Kentucky writes:

I would like to visit the State Department for about a week to give thoughts and suggestions... You all foot the bill, provide me a place to stay and I will love to visit and share thoughts...

Minhaz A.
|
Bangladesh
April 18, 2013

Minhaz A. in Bangladesh writes:

Hello! I am a State Alumnus and very keen to bring the Presidential Summit on Entrepreneurship to Bangladesh, how can I do that? Best, Minhaz

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