Conversations With America: Intercountry Adoption

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
November 11, 2012
Conversations With America: Intercountry Adoption

November is National Adoption Month. In recognition of this month, Ambassador Susan Jacobs, Special Advisor for Children's Issues, will hold a discussion on intercountry adoption with Christine James-Brown, President and CEO, Child Welfare League of America, and Richard Klarberg, President and CEO, Council on Accreditation. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, and will be available for on demand viewing soon on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog.

Intercountry adoption is an important way to find homes for children who otherwise would remain in institutional care. Adoption, like other matters of the family, is an emotionally charged issue, susceptible to unscrupulous actors. And at the heart of the process is a vulnerable child whose best interest must remain paramount. As a result, it is important for prospective adoptive parents to understand what to expect from the intercountry adoption process, how to choose an adoption service provider, and what they should expect from their adoption service professional before they begin the adoption process. We will address the challenges and opportunities to improve the intercountry adoption process, and how the role of accreditation promotes best practices. Our goal is to educate the public and adoption service providers about best practices and the role of the accreditation process in ensuring safe, ethical, and transparent intercountry adoptions.

You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the taping. Submit your questions below on DipNote and join the ongoing discussion via Twitter using the hashtag #IntercountryAdoption. Please submit questions via DipNote and Twitter as soon as possible for consideration.

Through Conversations With America, leaders of national non-governmental organizations have the opportunity to discuss foreign policy and global issues with senior State Department officials. These conversations aim to provide candid views of the ways in which leaders from the foreign affairs community are engaging the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

View other Conversations With America here and by accessing the Conversations With America video podcasts on iTunes.

Comments

Comments

Adri D.
|
United States
November 11, 2012

Adri D. writes:

Wow..

That is just a wonderful thing you guys are doing...Because the Bible teaches us to look after the widows and orphans...

yes I understand that we have too be careful

so that they don't get victimized once and again...

My question would be would these agency Provide security to their Newly adopted child?

Im an #IntercountryAdoption

Ashley
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 13, 2012

Ashley in Washington, D.C. writes:

Adopting children from all over the world has become an increasingly common thing for American families. What documentation is required to ensure these adoptions are legal in both the child's country and in the parents-to-be's country? What role does State play - confirming documentation? Overseeing policy related to documentation? Approving documents?

Yvonne A.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 13, 2012

Yvonne A. in Washington, D.C. writes:

I thank you for this opportunity. I am a South African citizen, married to a US Citizen and I would like to find out the procedure to adopt my late sister's 10 year old who is currently leaving in South Africa. His father is not that involved and is willing to forego custody.

Linda F.
|
Florida, USA
November 13, 2012

Linda F. in Florida writes:

Why do you make it so hard for people to adopt a child and then they endup going over seas and spending huge amounts of money for thier child when you can make it a little easier and more of parentless children can have a good home?
it really does not make any sense!

Linda

Maciej C.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 13, 2012

Maciej C. in Washington, D.C. writes:

What steps are NGOs/Non-Profits taking to influence or recommend new policies to government agencies like the State Department to ensure a more efficient system of cross-border adoption? Are there any successful case studies that can be shared with the public on this topic?

Paul C.
|
Iowa, USA
November 13, 2012

Paul C. in Iowa writes:

We've been trying for about a year and a half to move forward on adopting a boy from Russia who visited us with "Camp Hope" in Des Moines, June 2011. The Russian govt. became angry over language on the Camp Hope web site and is prohibiting adoption of the Camp Hope kids. We've had state dept. involved and no progress. Russia tells our govt. that the kids can be adopted, but they tell agency people on the ground not to bother because it will never happen. How aggressive can and will our government be to advocate for us and make this happen? We had home study done so we are qualified candidates. We need help from our government. Thank you.

Femmee A.
|
Pennsylvania, USA
November 13, 2012

Femmee A. in Pennsylvania writes:

Re: Tax Deductions for Adoption Costs

It seems like some (if not most) of these deductions will be eliminated soon and/or will they extended, what is the latest on this IRS policy?

Jacqueline Z.
|
Maine, USA
November 14, 2012

Jacqueline Z. in Maine writes:

With fraudulent child-trafficking adoption agencies growing globally how will the US protect it's citizens & deceived, exploited parents? #intercountryadoption

RA
|
Oklahoma, USA
November 14, 2012

R.A. in Oklahoma writes:

How do international adoptees go about getting original birth certificates? Like many adoptees, I want to know more about where I came from and maybe find my family someday. No one really understands when you say that you can't just call the town hall and get a copy.

Claudia
|
New Jersey, USA
November 14, 2012

Claudia in New Jersey writes:

How long does it take to become a license foster parent? I want to help/foster a child or two. I've call my local offices and I feel I'm not getting the right assistance. It's going to be a year this December since my husband and I made the decision.

Lavenir E.
|
Florida, USA
November 14, 2012

Lavenir E. in Florida writes:

I am in the process of applying for residents visa on behalf of my three step daughters who actually live in Haiti. My wife, their biological mother, is living with me. I have not gone through the adoption process because it is more and more complexe in Haiti. Would it be possible for me to make a request for citizenship for them at the time of the residency application or do I have to wait for them to move to the United States and file for adoption before I can proceed?

Thank you for your hard work on behalf of children.

Barbara M.
|
New York, USA
November 14, 2012

Barbara M. in New York writes:

Is State in discussion with Ministries of Justice/Family of Morocco re:bi-lateral agreement or other measures that would enable re-opening of kafala?

Sophia
|
Hawaii, USA
November 16, 2012

Sophia in Hawaii writes:

To quell the rumour that these kinds of abuses do NOT exist in families of wealth, wealthy families are just able to hide it better.

I know this specifically because I am the daughter of a wealthy and well-renown corporaton in CA who was blatantly refused any association with corporate success and was told to "just go off and get married."

Until this attitude is erased from the generations who carry and perpetuate this kind of an attitude, women, from BOTH wealthy and poor families, will be BLATANTLY DENIED OPPORTUNITIES!

Wealth also contributed to abuses and injustices, and life long injuries for which I will never be compensated. Truth and justice are the ONLY compensation!

Sophia
|
Hawaii, USA
November 16, 2012

Sophia in Hawaii writes:

How do you know that a child isn't just going to a wealthy amily that just needs a wite-off or has some other nefarious intent?

I hope you have people who check on the child's welfare! I PERSONALLY KNOW what it is like to be the victim of extreme abuses by adoptive parents.

Vanessa C.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 16, 2012

Vanessa C. in Washington, D.C. writes:

1. Are there different requirements to adopt an adult versus a minor?
2. What is the process for citizenship for someone adopted from another country? Is it automatic or is there a typical immigration process?
3. Is there any agency/entity that monitors and tracks international adoptions?
4. Who investigates suspicious or illegal international adoptions?
5. We have seen a lot of cases where individuals come to the US with a family friend who takes them on as an “adopted child” and with the promise of education and work opportunities. These individuals then typically end up in a domestic servitude situation. Currently, there is a mechanism in place to ensure that minors leaving the US have the consent from both parents. Is there a similar mechanism or screening tool when minors enter the US with a companion that is not a relative/guardian?
6. There were a lot of adoptions after the Haiti earthquake – what is the process of Humanitarian Parole? How does it work? Beyond meeting the child’s immediate basic needs (shelter, healthcare, etc), is it really in the child’s best interests long term?

Patrick
|
New Jersey, USA
March 14, 2013

Patrick in New Jersey writes:

Since the State Department has been engaging members of the various Diasporic Communities through many initiatives and the effort of the Secretary's Global Diaspora Conf. Will there be other opportunities to engage the members of Diaspora in direct/indirect work through the SD?

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