Conversations With America: Preventing WMD Proliferation

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
June 19, 2012
Conversations With America: Preventing WMD Proliferation

Thomas Countryman, Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of International Security and Non-Proliferation, will hold a conversation with Deepti Choubey, Senior Director for Nuclear and Bio-Security at the Nuclear Threat Initiative, on Preventing WMD Proliferation. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Public Affairs, and will be available for on demand viewing soon here on DipNote.

You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the broadcast. Submit your questions below on DipNote and join the ongoing discussion via Twitter using the hashtag #WMD. Please submit questions via DipNote and Twitter as soon as possible for consideration.

Through Conversations With America, leaders of national non-governmental organizations have the opportunity to discuss foreign policy and global issues with senior State Department officials. These conversations aim to provide candid views of the ways in which leaders from the foreign affairs community are engaging the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

View other Conversations With America here and by accessing the Conversations With America video podcasts on iTunes.

Comments

Comments

Ana C.
|
New York, USA
June 19, 2012

Ana D. in New York writes:

In the late 1980s through early 90s, South Africa voluntarily underwent nuclear disarmament. The African country stands as the first and only country to build nuclear weapons and then voluntarily give them up. What can we learn from this case and apply today in terms of prompting other countries to do the same?

Melissa
|
Maryland, USA
June 20, 2012

Melissa in Maryland writes:

How big a threat is WMD proliferation or is it just used to fearmonger?

Molly
|
District Of Columbia, USA
June 20, 2012

Molly in Washington, D.C. writes:

How has WMD proliferation become a problem? Aren't governments the only ones who can own these types of weapons?

Antonia D.
|
Greece
June 21, 2012

Antonia D. in Greece writes:

While the goal of establishing a WMDFZ in the Middle East and North Africa is shared in principle by all governments in the region —as well as the broader international community— political and strategic realities continue to make achievement of that goal elusive.

That said, what can be the role of confidence building measures in assessing WMD non-proliferation compliance, and the responsibilities of the scientific community in controlling BW and NW-relevant materials, technology, and expertise?

Michael
|
District Of Columbia, USA
June 21, 2012

Michael in Washington, D.C. writes:

Where does threat reduction fit in the broader context of U.S. nonproliferation goals? In what direction do you see threat reduction efforts going in the next 5-10 years?

Susan C.
|
Florida, USA
June 21, 2012

Susan C. in Florida writes:

From my observation many countries/nations strive to have WMDs so that they will have a way to control their relations with other countries, as well as, their own populations. Therefore, are not most WMDs "secret" and hidden from global view? So how do we propose to limit their proliferation?

Ashim C.
|
India
June 21, 2012

Ashim C. in India writes:

In Asia Pacific region three neighbouring states India, Pakistan and China are nuclear arm powers and more want to join the club. All of them talk about their threat perception to justify their nuclear programme. If proiferation has to stop here, initiatives have to start involving all three. What the international community is doing about it?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 22, 2012

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Ashim,

I may not be able to answer your question, but I had a though as to how the three might start a process to find the answers for themselves.

That's if the leaders of the three nations (along with all other nuclear armed nations and others concerned would show up in White Sands, New Mexico in October when the Trinity site of the first atomic test is opened to the public next.

And there in a concrete vista of the alternative reality, plege then and there never to war opon each other, ever.

Best,

EJ

Plus S.
|
United Kingdom
July 30, 2012

P.S. in the United Kingdom writes:

Where does risk decrease fit in the wider perspective of U.S. nonproliferation goals? In what route do you see risk decrease initiatives going in the next 5-10 years?

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