English Language Partnerships: Scaling Success Together

Posted by J. Adam Ereli
March 30, 2012
Instruction for English Language Teachers in the Republic of Georgia

Yesterday, I co-chaired a discussion on how innovative English language partnerships could better connect to and scale resources for English language teachers and learners worldwide.

Jointly hosted by the U.S. Department of State and TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages), our roundtable took place during TESOL's 2012 annual convention in Philadelphia. We invited 25 representatives from select commercial, non-governmental, academic, and governmental organizations to help us officially launch the TESOL-State Public-Private Partnership Consortium.

The demand for English language teaching is expanding rapidly around the world. Foreign governments, universities, and businesses need proficient speakers more than ever. U.S. Embassies from Brazil to Malaysia increasingly field requests for more English language learning and teaching resources.

Already, English programs run by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) are among the State Department's most sought-after and widely recognized public diplomacy tools. We work hard to ensure our programs are the best in the world, but given the scale of this work, we can't do that alone.

Working closely with partners in the industry and around the globe, we can more effectively expand and improve our English teaching programs overseas. The Department of State, TESOL, and other key English language teaching stakeholders will enhance our collective outreach and impact, thanks to this partnership. Also, through TESOL's network, we will also be able to connect more teachers and students to each other and to private and non-profit groups, foreign governments, and our wealth of online resources.

Today, we focused on building projects around tight business models, ensuring sustainability, and weaving two-way exchange into our projects. Some fantastic ideas came out of our discussions. The reception to our relationship with TESOL was deservedly positive at the Convention, and everyone in ECA is excited to be collaborating on the new and evolving projects that our connection with TESOL makes possible.

Follow the rest of this year's TESOL conference in the coming days with the Twitter hashtag #TESOL12. If you're in Philadelphia, I highly recommend you check out some of the convention programs that the State Department is hosting.

And, of course, I'd love to hear your ideas to improve English teaching -- connect with me via @aereli on Twitter!

Comments

Comments

Nicole
|
United States
March 31, 2012

Nicole in the U.S.A. writes:

This is very nice and informative blog. This information is very good. Thanks for sharing it.

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 31, 2012

Anna in Washington, D.C. writes:

@ Nicole -- I agree with you. As an educator, I believe partnerships such as this one are more important than we realize for the future of our young people. Thank you, Ambassador Ereli, for furthering educational opportunities.

Molly
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 31, 2012

Molly in Washington, D.C. writes:

Loves it!

Ashim C.
|
India
April 1, 2012

Ashim C. in India writes:

Giving skills in English is a sure way of empowering people to acquire knowledge and moving towards a better world. Much of advantage India has is due to popularity of English language, which reflected in desire of every parent to send kids to an English medium school. But linguistic nationalism supports teaching of local languages and classical language. There is nothing wrong in this except that it creates extra language learning burden and hurdles in acquiring proficiency in English, which gives one clear advantage in so many ways. Given a choice, more parents would prefer to send kids to "only English" schools as that will make their kids equal to the advantaged third or fourth generation English knowing population. The obstacle in this lack of qualified English teachers. Possibly, this can be overcome by extensive use of technology and mass media.

taj
|
Pakistan
April 1, 2012

Taj in Pakistan writes:

Dear

I have my organisation we are arranging some class for nun elite and living below poverty class to develop skills of good English is way of make perfect people to get info and moving towards and fast world. those who have Much of advantage of English language, which reflected in desire of every parent to send kids to an English medium school. But linguistic nationalism supports teaching of local languages and classical language. There is not bed in this except that it creates extra language learning burden and hurdles in acquiring proficiency in English, which gives one clear advantage in so many ways. i hope USA govt will help us to make world better place for non elite class person in sindh.

Karen G.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 3, 2012

Karen G. in Washington, D.C. writes:

Ambassador Ereli, what advice do you have for someone interested in a 2nd career in working overseas to expand English teaching programs? I've had some teaching experience, albeit over 20 years ago; and, currently hold a security clearance with the Federal Government (though I imagine that's not relevant to this kind of work). I already intend to pursue TESOL certification. Any guidance on getting a job would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.

Respectfully,
Karen G.

harpreet d.
|
India
April 9, 2012

Harpreet S. in India writes:

i want ti talk gud inglesh

Susanna
|
Armenia
May 13, 2012

Susanna in Armenia writes:

Hello respected Mr.

I highly appreciate your efforts in that sphere. Really that's a great project. If only I could be there and took part in it!

Nhung
|
Vietnam
September 3, 2012

Nhung in Vietnam writes:

Dear Sir,

I am a teacher of English in a lower Secondary School in Nam Dinh City in Viet Nam. I am very interested in developing skills of good English. And I think this is a nice and informative blog. This information is very good. Thanks for sharing it.

.

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