Conversations With America: Global Youth Issues

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 27, 2012
Conversations With America: Special Advisor Ronan Farrow Addresses Global Youth Issues

Ronan Farrow, Special Adviser for Global Youth Issues, will hold a conversation with Bill Reese, President & CEO, International Youth Foundation, on Global Youth Issues. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, and will be available for on demand viewing soon here on DipNote.

You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the broadcast. Submit your questions below on DipNote, and join the ongoing discussion via Twitter using the hashtag #GlobalYouth. Please submit questions via DipNote and Twitter by April 4 for consideration.

Through Conversations with America, leaders of national nongovernmental organizations have the opportunity to discuss foreign policy and global issues with senior State Department officials. These conversations aim to provide candid views of the ways in which leaders from the foreign affairs community are engaging the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

View other Conversations with America here and by accessing the Conversations with America video podcasts on iTunes.

Editor's Note: This Conversations With America webcast occurred on April 6. You can read the transcript here.

Comments

Comments

Daniella M.
|
New York, USA
March 27, 2012

Daniella M. in New York writes:

How do you think the recent success of the youth movement in the Senegalese presidential elections (via M23 and Y'en a marre) will affect youth engagement in politics in sub-Saharan Africa?

Michelle B.
|
United Kingdom
March 27, 2012

Michelle B. in the United Kingdom writes:

A great idea! and very inclusive :)

Katharine K.
|
Colorado, USA
March 27, 2012

Katharine K. in Colorado writes:

I would like to know how going forward, Americans will take a larger role or a leading role in aiding children under humanitarian circumstances; such as children starving in Africa, the child humanitarian crisis in Syria, AIDS orphans etc. The relevancy of my question to the State Dept. seems less so than to the United States' Role in the UN so if you want, could rephrase to State Dept.'s role in protecting US youth abroad on Humanitarian missions described above. Thank you.

Rebecca
|
Arizona, USA
March 27, 2012

Rebecca in Arizona writes:

I work with children in the court system, particularly in family and juvenile court. What is the United States doing to help ensure children's voices are heard when they are involved with the courts through no fault of their own?

almoros i.
|
Cameroon
March 27, 2012

Idriss A. in Cameroon writes:

How to motivate the youth to unify the christian world (the western nations, Latin and South America, Russia) instead of those demode cold war policies which have been potentially destructively labeling and classifying some as Latinos or communit Russians, which have been giving their shared potential or historical enemies, great chances to guide great destructive economical, regional or drugs smuggling wars anti them all!

Davron
|
Uzbekistan
March 27, 2012

Davron in Uzbekistan writes:

It’s great that DoS realized importance of youth in promoting its interests and significance of youth issues in today global agenda! How are you going to prioritize youth –adult partnership within Department of State, in order to ensure that youth is not only seen as target group or beneficiary , but youth meaningfully involved in Dos strategy development , implementation and monitoring?

Thanks

Tiburce C.
|
Benin
March 27, 2012

Tiburce C. in Benin writes:

I am part of the Global Youth Innovation Network, a youth led organization sponsored by Ifad and Phelps Stokes and operating in the Americas, Africa and Asia. Our focus is on Agribusiness- Innovation- Leadership and Employment. As an African, I would like to know the perspective and the key points around which The US Department of State will collaborate with the African Youth in order to bring practical results to the problems there are facing.

Thanks
gyin.org

GIna M.
|
California, USA
March 28, 2012

Gina M. in California writes:

What are the newest initiatives for educating younger children on the importance of Financial Literacy?

Mark E.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 2, 2012

Mark E. in Washington, D.C. writes:

The main global instrument that addresses and protect the rights of children and youth is the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Unfortunately, the US is one of only three countries that has not ratified the CRC. How does that affect our ability as Americans to work on youth issues globally? How can we convince the Obama Administration to finally move this treaty forward to the Senate for consideration?

Maciej C.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 2, 2012

Maciej C. in Washington, D.C. writes:

What have organizations such as, The International Youth Foundation, done in the delicate balance of work and school for teens (16+) around the world? More specifically the developing/under developed regions? There seems to be heavy emphasis on education, but when teens are the main income generators for their households how do we balance these two? And, what have these organizations done in developing adequate and sustainable educational programs in these developing countries to ensure an efficient balance?

Sulaiman T.
|
Virginia, USA
April 3, 2012

Sulaiman T. in Virginia writes:

Since the Arab Spring, protests, riots, and revolutions involving tens of millions of teenagers and twenty-somethings have shaken the global political orders. How are children/teens's voices are heard and not ignored in other nations such as the Arab/Middle East Countries.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 4, 2012

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Question for the global youth;

How would you define change you can live with?

And how can you assist the older generation in power on the world stage today in creating the reality you seek in the world for your's and future generations to come?

Alex
|
California, USA
April 4, 2012

Alex in California writes:

How do you dissuade a young person from using his talents for crime? We all talk about engaging youths to be change agents of the world, but we know that there are those who consciously choose to be a negative agent. What can we do? Thks.

Musse O.
|
Oregon, USA
April 4, 2012

Musse O. in Oregon writes:

As Somalia situation is improving and Al-shabab weakening, is there a possibility the Somali community in USA (Somali diaspora) can partner with the State Department on addressing and the resolution of the youth issues in Somalia. As Al-Shabab fades away and Somali government increases its reach the most important issue will be the issue of human rights. The lack of respect for human rights is the main reason Somalia ended up 21 years of chaos. To have a stable, prosperous and democratic government will require that everyone rights to be respected. This notion is very foreign to those living inside Somalia for the last 21 years of destructive civil war and the absence of democratic authority. All they know is the lawlessness of the warlords followed by the limp & throat cutting Al-Shabab style justice. This is a country where overwhelming majority of the population is under 18 years.

Eunice D.
|
Maryland, USA
April 4, 2012

Eunice D. in Maryland writes:

Communicable Disease Control/Immunization: As a Public Health Nurse with more than 30 years of experience internationally and here at home, I often wonder what it will take for those Nations who have resources, to provide aid, much needed aid to countries who for example lack access to the HPV vaccine!

Ali A.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 4, 2012

Ali A. in Washington, D.C. writes:

Your department has declined to comment on the status of human rights leader and trainer from Bahrain AbdulHadi AlKhawajah who has been on a hunger strike for over 50 days in the prison of the Bahraini Monarchy. Is your silence because of cultural differences you have with Arabs and Muslims?

John
|
Canada
April 5, 2012

John in Canada writes:

The Youth around the world today should listen to one song ("Real Situation" Bob Marley) and get inspired to identify the real problems - rather then to be herded into becoming part of the problems.

Sadly the sheeple have no sheperd. Only wolves leading them to slaughter.

SustainUS
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 6, 2012

Sustain in Washington, D.C. writes:

It is positive to see that DOS is including youth into their international agenda. However, it seems like it is only limited to youth in the middle East. How to we go in streamlining youth participation in all DOS priority areas such as: energy, conflict and economic development. For example, the business sector had more opportunity to be listen and to be represented in the upcoming Rio+20 Summit. Why youth did not had the same chance? Why dont get to be part of the US Delegation when the topics being discussed are linked to our future?

.

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