Conversations With America: U.S.- Jamaica Relations

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 13, 2012

Ambassador Pamela Bridgewater, U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica, held a conversation with Ambassador Curtis Ward, President of the Caribbean Research & Policy Center, on U.S.-Jamaica Relations. The discussion was moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, and is now available for on demand viewing above and here. Videos are also available on iTunes podcasts.

Members of the public were invited to participate by submitting questions via DipNote and Twitter, and some of those questions were selected for response during the broadcast.

Through Conversations with America, leaders of national nongovernmental organizations have the opportunity to discuss foreign policy and global issues with senior State Department officials. These conversations aim to provide candid views of the ways in which leaders from the foreign affairs community are engaging the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

View other Conversations with America here and by accessing the Conversations with America video podcasts on iTunes.

Comments

Comments

bayreuth L.
|
United States
March 14, 2012

Bayreuth in the U.S. writes:

It is a know fact that 80% of the illegal guns that ended up in Jamaica can be traced back to the USA ( especially in the state of Florida).What is the USA government doing on their part to help the government of Jamaica with this problem.?

Tennyson L.
|
Maryland, USA
March 14, 2012

Don in Maryland writes:

Question: Given the large numbers of American citizens in Jamaica at any given time what is the US government policy on developing and instituting appropriate security strategies that are mutually beneficial to Jamaica and the US.This does not assume that Jamaica is a security threat but given the global nature of risks it is reasonable to surmise that the US is as vulnerable as its neighbors.

Barbara H.
|
Jamaica
March 14, 2012

Barbara in Jamaica writes:

Can the US Government consider putting in place programmes that extend funding to the Caribbean's creative individuals and industries, in similar manner as the EU recognizes that the Caribbean needs upgrading of skills and opportunities to present their creative products competitively against the more experienced, already established US creative industries.

Michael P.
|
California, USA
March 14, 2012

Michael in California writes:

I am a member of Gays Without Borders, a group concerned with the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Jamaica. We applaud the State Department's advocacy for the respect of LGBT Jamaicans and request that LGBT issues are raised during the conversation.

How is the U.S. prodding the Kingston government to investigate and prosecute bias motivated crimes and will the upcoming annual human rights report mention an improvement or setback for LGBT concerns in Jamaica?

Are there plans to counter the virulent anti-LGBT preaching of religious leaders? What movement can be taken to repeal the anti buggery statues through legislative or judicial avenues?

Looking forward to having these and other LGBT concerns on the tape of the conversation. The conversation, asking folks for questions, and then making the chat available as on-demand media is all good. I would suggest also transcribing the entire conversation on Jamaica to further engage stakeholders.

federick h.
|
Jamaica
March 14, 2012

Federick in Jamaica writes:

their madam bridgewaters, my concerns is this like my self Lt.federick Hart, who as served the embassy diplomatic service/whackenhut security limited by providing security for the diplomats and families overall and leave the the job why is that when we came to the embassy we get turn down. isn't that we are and should get the chance to visit your country with out the fair that we will get turn down. thats my concerns, thank you for the appertunity to express my views thank you. Lt. federick Hart.

P. R.
|
United States
March 14, 2012

P. in the U.S. writes:

1. Amb. Ward: Please explain what Caribbean Diaspora means and the difference (if any)between this term and the African Diaspora within the context of the definition of Diaspora.

2. What types of programming or intervention is currently in place or being planned to address the very real problem with skin bleaching in the Caribbean and Jamaica, in particular? Are there serious underlying issues with embracing African heritage or is there just not enough information available at this point?

3. What policies are not in place now that either side (Caribbean or US) would like to see implemented to the mutual benefit of all nations invloved?

Ambassador A.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 14, 2012

Denis in Washington, D.C. writes:

This exercise is very worthwhile and it is a useful demonstration of the partnetship between the US and Jamaica and the Caribbean. I have always considered Jamaica the heartbeat of the Caribbean "How goes Jamaica there goes the Caribbean!"

Considering the highly qualified persons which Jamaica and the rest of the Caribbean prepare and send to the US is there a direct initiative by the US to assist Jamaica and the Caribbean with their education bill?

Bernadette
|
Jamaica
March 14, 2012

Bernadette in Jamaica writes:

How do educational and professional training exchange programs promote U.S. Foreign policy aims?

What are the expected outcomes for U.S. - Jamaica relations from this investment in human capital, as perceived by the U.S. Government and people?

Paul
|
France
March 14, 2012

Paul in France writes:

Can we use a method other than DipNote or Twitter to ask our questions?
And you know where I can follow the conversation,I'm living to France and I do not have the ability to access to American television.
Thx a lot !

Richard K.
|
Maryland, USA
March 14, 2012

Richard in Maryland writes:

The bulk of US assistance to the Jamaican education sector has been in the country's K-12 system. Are there plans to assist the country in the much needed rationalization of the tertiary/higher education level?

B. L.
|
United Kingdom
March 14, 2012

B. in the U.K. writes:

Ambassador Ward & Ambassador Bridgewater:

1. In light of most Caribbean post-colonial States marking their 50th year of independence this year, what are your views on new/ modern 'constitutionalism' more so with the current debate on whether Jamaica should move from a constitutional monarchy to a republic; and why this seems to be fundamental to modern Caribbean identity?
and
2. Caribbean regional integration marks its 50th year anniversary from the West Indies Federation to modern Caricom, having made incredible leaps within trade and industry (especially within the creative industry and sport). What is the current US policy agenda for engagement with modern CARICOM's programmes in this era?
Thank you.

Rick
|
Maryland, USA
March 14, 2012

Rick in Maryland writes:

I think that the present immigration laws with regards to deportation , needs to be revisited.Some of these laws are destroying families who in most cases depend on the government to take care of them; ofter head of the household is been deported.

Lisa
|
United States
March 14, 2012

Lisa in the U.S. writes:

1. The Jamaican Diaspora which constitues a large population in the United States significantly contributes to the Jamaican economy by way of monetary remittances. As the island celebrates its 50th year of independence, how can we in the diaspora build on that and facilitate the flow of intellectual remittances? Further, how would the ambassadors define intellectual remittances?

2. If CARICOM disintegrates, would this significantly impact US-Jamaica relations?

Marcia
|
Jamaica
March 14, 2012

Marcia in Jamaica writes:

I am wondering why the US, being the world's strongest superpower nation a this time, cannot find the willpower to do much more to assist and support Jamaica in terms of its policy and management of security and justice...myriad issues relating to the persistently high crime rate and seeming inadequacy of our Justice system. Yes, we are an independent state in our right; however I think much more can be done by foreign powers such as the US, which by its very existence help to perpetuate the prevailing problems because of its proximity to the island and its proclivity (of its people) to drugs and guns.

Deborah
|
Maryland, USA
March 14, 2012

Deborah in Maryland writes:

Immigration Reform on Deportation Policies:
Reassess guidelines on deportation for those immigrants who are established in the U.S. for over 5 years with families, careers and that have been involved in minor criminal acts that pose no major threat to public safety. Under the Immigration Reform Act let’s call this the R.E.S.I.D.E Act. Rehabilitated & Established Settled Immigrants Due Equality.

Rev. W.
|
Florida, USA
March 14, 2012

Rev. Dr. Nancy in Florida writes:

In light of the recent December 6th Presidential Memo and the Secretary of State's speech that same day highlighting LGBT rights as human rights and specifically addressing the right to be free from violence because of sexual orientation or gender identity, what role do you think the United States should play with regard to securing an end to the violence directed against LGBT people in Jamaica?

Jim
|
Hawaii, USA
March 22, 2012

Jim in Hawaii writes:

Why are Jamaican artistes like Capleton, Mavado, Beenie Man,etc who have lengthy histories of singing songs that call for LGBT people to be killed and who also make stage comments and deliver rants calling for LGBT people to be killed, allowed to perform in the U.S.?

A new, very homophobic Jamaican performer who is starting to tour in the U.S. is I Wayne.

There are some Jamaican artistes who don't promote hatred and violence.

Ali A.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 26, 2012

Ali A. in Washington, D.C. writes:

The Saudi Monarchy continues to abuse children and legalize child marriage. There is not minimum age of marriage under the Saudi Monarchy, that’s why girls as young as 6 and 8 years of age have been married off by Saudi courts. Why have the State Department never issued a single statement about this? Is it due to the American official cultural view of Arabs as backward and unworthy of human rights?

Oystercracker
|
United States
April 30, 2012

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

I would like to see high ranking American high schools partnered with Carribean schools so that there is affordable educational opportunity and interchange between the schools primarily in medical careers. There are vast areas where these affordable partnerships would strengthen the ties to both countries and serve to educate doctors for Obama's healthcare policies.

person
|
Tennessee, USA
January 7, 2013

P. in Tennessee writes:

boring and pointless

.

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