Join a Discussion on Religion and Foreign Policy

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 9, 2012
Conversations With America Broadcast: Religion and Foreign Policy

Update: Watch the video here.

Suzan Johnson Cook, Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom, will hold a conversation with Dr. Chris Seiple, President of the Institute for Global Engagement, on the role of religion in foreign policy. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs, and will be available to view here on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog on January 25. Members of the general public are invited to participate by submitting questions in the comments section of this DipNote entry, some of which will be selected for response during the broadcast.

This is the twenty-third in the Conversations with America video series coordinated by the Bureau of Public Affairs, in which the State Department's senior leadership hosts conversations online, with leaders of prominent non-governmental organizations. Discussion topics include foreign policy and global issues and provide a candid view of how leaders from civil society engage the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

Comments

Comments

Al B.
|
Kansas, USA
January 9, 2012

Al B. in Kansas writes:

What is the purpose of defending other countries' poeple's freedom, when we have so many of our urban children force to defense themself unintentionally, for example, when we go to war, we allow the terorists shoot first before we shoot at them with three warning shots?. and why domestic forces shoot at their citizens without a warning shot? Why do our justice systems allow the rich poeple to rob the poor and say, it's the law? why when poor poeple walk past the bank they call us criminal regardless of our action? why when rich poeple leave their children home alone, it's call social responsibility? however, when poor poeple working to feed their children, it's call children abuse and neglegence? all and all, the situation are the same in the eyes of the lord. but in the eyes of the social justice is an egg and a rock? "when opportunity knock on the rich, it's call business. When opportunity knock on the poor, don't move wait your turn untill I have some bone left over to throw at your head.

Thank you.

Bless you all.

Kathy M.
|
Arkansas, USA
January 9, 2012

Kathy M. in Arkansas writes:

Considering as of 2008, 76% of Americans are Christian, why does Obama say that America is not a Christian nation? Why do you support those who have declared us the Big Satan and have declared jihad against us and Israel?

Why does the state department automatically assume that demonstrators are right and civil governments are wrong?

Why in the world did you take money away from hard working Americans and their children and give it to the Hamas in the Gaza strip under the auspices of humanitarian help for the Palestinians?

Why do the people in the state department continue to act as enablers to those that are self destructive? You are giving a gun to a child when you do so. Why do you hate Israel when the American people are overwhelmingly in support of Israel and Jerusalem, Israel's capital? Why do you continually ignore the death and destruction that the Palestinians launch on the Israeli people(Israeli, Christian and Muslim combined)?

What are you going to do about Christians being killed in Nigeria? What are you doing for the Christian pastor who is being threatened with death in Iran?

If you don't wake up, there may not be a USA State department in the future. We have enemies. Stop coddling them!

business23
January 9, 2012

W.W. writes:

twitter? conx ? some live interactions for world cyber citizen?

L E.
|
Canada
January 10, 2012

L. in Canada writes:

Ambassador Cook - Suicide bombings in the name of Allah. Qur'an burning. Iran and the use of great satan. Anti antisemitism. Fundamentalist Jews. The catholic pope making negative remarks towards Buddhism.Wannabe Templar going mental with a gun. Muslim killing Muslim - Jew against Jew - Christian against Christian - everyone against everyone else- Church bombings - mosque burnings. Where do you begin?

You are tasked with a job that seems insurmountable. And president Obama thinks dealing with congress is headache.(Laugh)

Do you have wings tucked behind your back by chance?(chuckle)

Seems what you need is a miracle to do your job.

While some may not appreciate your job and some would view many other issues as more important - your job is of more importance than the respect the mainstream would give to you.

I wish you the best and who knows with a little faith you will get that miracle that you need.

Life is certainly stranger than fiction.

marcia
|
Colorado, USA
January 10, 2012

Marcia in Colorado writes:

Until we remove religion from our lives (age of aquarius?), there's probably no hope at all for peace. Everyone's always defending their god against somebody else's idea of their god. It'll never end. If religion were removed from all the arguments, would there BE an argument?

Elaine
January 10, 2012

Elaine writes:

How tolerant should we be of intolerance? Is it a Christian's religious right to refuse to acknowledge a legally married, same-sex couple as "married" on the grounds that he holds the term "marriage" as sacred? Is it a Muslim's right to follow the Qur'an when it says: [9.29] "Fight those who do not believe in Allah, nor in the latter day, nor do they prohibit what Allah and His Apostle have prohibited, nor follow the religion of truth, out of those who have been given the Book, until they pay the tax in acknowledgment of superiority and they are in a state of subjection"?

SB
|
North Carolina, USA
January 10, 2012

S.B. in North Carolina writes:

In what capacity do you recommend faith communities to get involved in foreign policy?

Do you offer curriculum, training, etc. to assist faith communities with better informing their participants in foreign policy matters?

Some faith communities are overwhelmed with issues in their local communities. How would you encourage the leaders of these faith communities to still engage their participants in international matters?

Chloe S.
|
United States
January 11, 2012

Chloe S. in the U.S.A. writes:

Any news about A defector's mysterious disappearance?

John P.
|
Greece
January 12, 2012

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Kathy M. in Arkansas

I think that the President’s phrase is a great phrase!

It depends on how you interpret it…

I don’t put words in his mouth, but I think that I can help you by sharing with you how I understand his phrase when he says that “America is not a Christian nation”.

1. I am a Christian Orthodox if that helps… However, even if you have a society of 76% Christians this does not make it a Christian nation as long as you still have 24% of other religions, Atheists, or whatever (if you think that the majority of the 76% can teach the minority of 24% on how they can fly to their “heaven”, then you are very close to become what fanatic Muslims are: terrorists. It’s the point that you create a new religion paranoia in a Jihad way)

2. America was/is and will be a nation build in a mosaic platform. That’s the success of this system. Everyone is free to believe in whatever he thinks it’s good for him, as far as he respects the law.

3. When he says that U.S.A. is not a Christian nation he underlines the BASIC argument that whatever happened in the past, happens and will happen, with our efforts against terrorism, is not a question of a religious war that Iranians & the Co. are trying to present. It’s just a reaction of people who want to live in peace and create a safe planet for their kids. Our kids!

His phrase is even deeper, but I’ll stop here for now.

Best Regards!

@Marcia in Colorado

Although you have a point, you are about to enter the dangerous tunel attempting to teach others where the paradise is...

Best Regards!

Kambiz K.
|
Pakistan
January 12, 2012

Kambiz K. in Pakistan writes:

It would be nice to see the US State Dept officially recognize that there are Jewish people living in Pakistan and Kashmir.

tig
|
Central African Republic
January 13, 2012

Tig in Central African Republic writes:

These facts dont seem realistic

John P.
|
Greece
January 13, 2012

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Kambiz K. in Pakistan --

Why SD should go ahead with such a statement? It’s obvious they are living there too. Jewish are not aliens from outer space. They live everywhere.

I mean I wish you believe the same. They are common, ordinary people like all of us and they must have the right to live anywhere in the planet, having exactly the same rights with other citizens no matter their religious choice.

Of course I understand that being a Jew living in Pakistan or Kashmir is not exactly a walk in the park due to the Islamic fanatics and terrorism. But obviously they live there too. A rough example proving this is the “Daniel Pearl” case. As you probably know, he was an American-Jewish journalist, living with his family in Pakistan, working for the Wall Street Journal –if I recall. He unfortunately lost his life after a paranoid, fanatic “priest” and his gang kidnapped and executed him.

What I mean is that if we start treating Jews in a “special”, photographic way it’s like starting to play the game in a Hitler’s way. This monster attempted to “stamp” Jewish people, discriminating them from the others. In 2012, we must stop continuing this strategy of focusing on them assuming that they are something strange and different.

Of course I understand your good will offering this comment and I don’t know whether the SD will decide to make a statement as you suggest or not.

However, according to my opinion, it’s not that important on the ground that Jews live equally among us everywhere and they have every right to do so.

Kambiz K.
|
Pakistan
January 14, 2012

Kambiz K. in Pakistan writes:

The problems faced by the Jewish people living in Pakistan are not only from Muslim fundamentalists but white-collared fundamentalists, multi-nationals, and even US security contractors. It would greatly help if the US State Dept recognize the fact that there ARE people of Jewih faith, living in Pakistan and Kashmir.

Todd T.
|
Alaska, USA
January 14, 2012

Todd T. in Alaska writes:

I see that President Obama is declaring January 16, 2012 as "Religious Freedom Day." My question is, how is that different than any other day. Shouldn't we be able to have the "Free Exercise" to practice and express our faith any day of the year? How does this 'declared' day differ?

Martin S.
|
Minnesota, USA
January 14, 2012

Martin S. in Minnesota writes:

How seriously does the State Department work with US churches that have close relations with churches in difficult parts of the world? Especially if the US churches are conveying critical input from their partners?

Muhammed
|
India
January 15, 2012

Muhammed in India writes:

It appears that American occupation forces in Iraq and Afghanistan work in close cooperation with Christian missionaries in spreading Christianity there.

Emma M.
|
United States
January 22, 2012

Emma M. in the USA writes:

Hah, Italy demonstrators rally against Berlusconi

Kambiz K.
|
Pakistan
January 19, 2012

Kambiz K. in Pakistan writes:

The US SD should stop supporting the white-collared fundamentalists like the Khursheed Mahmood Kasauri (Pakistan's Former Foriegn Minister) and his family members, who preend to support US interest in Pakistan, but have repeatedly demonstrated their hatrade towards the Jewish people living in Pakistan.

Chuck
|
Louisiana, USA
January 19, 2012

Chuck in Louisiana writes:

Why does it seem that China's shortcomings in religious freedom is being ignored by the Dept. of State?

wowgoldtsi
|
United States
January 22, 2012

W. in the USA writes:

Ive been meaning to read this and just never acquired a chance. Its an issue that Im really interested in, I just started reading and Im glad I did. Youre a fantastic blogger, one of the ideal that Ive seen. This blog absolutely has some information on topic that I just wasnt aware of. Thanks for bringing this stuff to light.

John W.
|
Texas, USA
January 20, 2012

John W. in Texas writes:

The United States doesn't "do" anything about the lack of religious freedom in China for the same reason it doesn't do anything about it in other countries. It's none of the US business. No matter what some people world wide think, The United States doen't have the authority to go around and police the rest of the world. As anyone who studies history should be able to tell, lots of times when we stick our nose in other countries domestic business, we get negative results. Just look at Iraq!

Audrey
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Audrey in Washington, D.C. writes:

Religious freedom is obviously something which the U.S. Government cares about a lot, but why does it matter?

Chelsea
|
Georgia
January 20, 2012

Chelsea in Georgia writes:

How does a lack of freedom halfway around the globe impact us here in the USA?

Ryan P.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Ryan P. in Washington, D.C. writes:

In the West, many complain of non-Western immigrants importing inhumane cultural practices, female genital manipulation and honor killings being chief examples. Yet many people abroad also complain that the U.S. is offensively asserting its own values overseas religiously and culturally. In increasingly multi-cultural globalized contexts, how does the State Department demarcate between a ritual practiced with earnest belief and a definitively immoral practice? How does the State Department strike a balance between universalism, cosmopolitanism, and ethical relativism?

Catherine H.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Catherine H. in Washington, D.C. writes:

How does a lack of freedom halfway around the globe impact us here in the USA?

Maureen
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Maureen in Washington, D.C. writes:

What is the State Department doing to help end religious persecution, including killings, of Catholics in India? Is India ever included in the State Department report on religious persecution?

Melissa
|
Maryland, USA
January 20, 2012

Melissa in Maryland writes:

Do you see a greater chance for religious freeom in Myanmar now that the government is opening up more? What is being done to protect the Karen people?

Karina N.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Karina N. in Washington, D.C. writes:

It seems surprising to think of religion working in tandem with foreign policy. At first glance, the two just don't seem to be natural partners. How do they fit together?

Vaiese T.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 20, 2012

Vaiese T. in Washington writes:

First and formost I am a Iraq War veteran and a member a Army National Guard in Washington State. For the last 5 months I have applied for many opportunities to work in high threat area for any contractor jobs. I also received many phone interview with promising lead for a possible employment until when it comes to a birth place. I was born in American Samoa which is an American territory which makes me a US National but not citizen. So I my question is, why is ok for us to serve in Armed Forces and die for the country that we loved but when it comes to work contractor jobs which is most control by the department of state and as a US National aren't authories to do so? I feel this is so disservice for all my brothers and sister that died in both war for not given us the same opportunity as the us citizen. I feel the country that we serve and fought wars for is turning their backs on us.

John P.
|
Greece
January 20, 2012

John P. in Greece writes:

Chelsea in Georgia writes: Catherine H. in Washington, D.C. writes: “How does a lack of freedom halfway around the globe impact us here in the USA?”

Obviously because it’s double-sided girls!

Just a beer and I see you double!

That’s the impact…

If anything happens to one side of the moon, be sure that the other side won't be the same.

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