Women, Peace, and Security

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
December 19, 2011

More:White House Fact Sheet | U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security

On December 19, at Georgetown University, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton discussed new efforts across the U.S. government to support women's participation in peace and security, including plans to better protect women from conflict-related violence and promote women's leadership and perspectives in all aspects of conflict prevention, resolution, relief, and recovery. Secretary Clinton said:

"...This is not just a woman's issue. It cannot be relegated to the margins of international affairs. It truly does cut to the heart of our national security and the security of people everywhere, because the sad fact is that the way the international community tries to build peace and security today just isn't getting the job done. Dozens of active conflicts are raging around the world, undermining regional and global stability, and ravaging entire populations. And more than half of all peace agreements fail within five years. At the same time, women are too often excluded from both the negotiations that make peace and the institutions that maintain it. Now of course, some women wield weapons of war -- that's true -- and many more are victims of it. But too few are empowered to be instruments of peace and security."

Secretary Clinton said, "...This morning, President Obama signed an Executive Order launching the first-ever U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security -- a comprehensive roadmap for accelerating and institutionalizing efforts across the United States government to advance women's participation in making and keeping peace. This plan builds on the President's national security strategy, and it was jointly developed by the Departments of State and Defense, USAID, and others with guidance from the White House."

The National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security and the Executive Order represent a fundamental change in how the United States will approach its diplomatic, military, and development-based support to women in areas of conflict, by ensuring that their perspectives and considerations of gender are woven into the fabric of how the United States approaches peace processes, conflict prevention, the protection of civilians, and humanitarian assistance.

In her remarks, Secretary Clinton said, "...We have enough anecdotal evidence and research that demonstrates women in peacekeeping is both the right thing to do and the smart thing, as well. It's right, because, after all, women are affected disproportionately by conflict; they deserve to participate in the decisions that shape their own lives. And it's the smart thing because we have seen again and again that women participating in these processes builds more durable peace."

Join the discussion on Facebook.

Comments

Comments

THEO K.
|
Washington, USA
December 19, 2011

Theo K. in Washington writes:

WOMEN HOLD THE EMOTIONAL STABILITY AND PSYCHE OF THE WORLD IN THE PALM OF THEIR HANDS, THEY WILL RISE TO THEIR TRUE CALLING OF GODDESS OF EARTH AND THE UNIVERSE AND THERE WILL BE PEACE!!

Zharkov
|
United States
December 19, 2011

Zharkov in USA writes:

In Saudi Arabia, Sharia court sentenced a woman accused of engaging in witchcraft to beheading by a sword.

Here are some unpleasant details: before dying, the "witch", was made to suffer because the beheading was performed gradually, in three steps. Thus, she became the 73rd person executed this year under Sharia.

The Saudi government apparently has no clue about how barbaric, disgustingly medieval, ignorant, and horrifying this method of execution is.

For Americans in particular and populations of Western nations generally, it is revolting.

We should not want allies who treat women that criminally-inhumane way.

Particularly for non-crimes such as "witchcraft", which is a belief, not a crime, there should be no punishment.

Witchcraft is only a fear of ignorant, superstitious peasants, not modern, educated people who know there can be no such crime because it is an opinion, not a crime.

The US government should choose its allies with their human rights record in mind.

There should be no doubt that Saudi Arabia belongs on the list of human rights violators, along with Israel and Iran.

Buket E.
|
Turkey
December 19, 2011

Buket E. in Turkey writes:

Dear Madam,

Thanks a lot to your contribution to empowering women around the world.I agree with your remark of investing in prevention.I'm sure creative and innovative tools of social media will help a lot in the promoting the women's entrepreneurship and leadership.

Kind regards,
Buket Ertenu

Md. R.
|
Bangladesh
December 20, 2011

Zakaria R. in Bangladesh writes:

i want to write here of my own feelings, thoughts regarding the oppression that is being done towards women in general.

ahmed e.
|
Egypt
December 20, 2011

Ahmed in Egypt writes:

We reject the U.S. government intervention in the internal affairs of Egypt, where human rights which Fltoa Matsamy occupied with Wall Street

We reject the U.S. government intervention in the internal affairs of Egypt, where human rights which Fltoa Matsamy occupied with Wall Street

We reject the U.S. government intervention in the internal affairs of Egypt, where human rights which Fltoa Matsamy occupied with Wall Street

We reject the U.S. government intervention in the internal affairs of Egypt, where human rights which Fltoa Matsamy occupied with Wall Street

We reject the U.S. government intervention in the internal affairs of Egypt, where human rights which Fltoa Matsamy occupied with Wall Street

Carolne G.
|
Florida, USA
January 1, 2012

Caroline G. in Florida writes:

Comment on the inability of White House to answer to abuse of US women acting within close proximity to international diplomatic. Also comment on resonsibilties of White House pertaining.

.

Latest Stories

Pages