Ambassador Donahoe: 'To the People of Syria, the World Stands by You'

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
December 2, 2011
10th Human Rights Council Session

More:Statement by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton

Today, Ambassador Eileen Chamberlain Donahoe delivered a statement at the Human Rights Council Special Session on Syria. Ambassador Donahoe said:

"For the third time this year, we join a special session to make clear the international community's grave concerns over the situation in Syria, where the authorities are committing mass atrocities and gross human rights violations against the Syrian people.

"The Syrian people have an irrepressible hunger for a new political order. They are no longer willing to tolerate denial of their human rights and the trampling of their dignity. They are no longer willing to remain quiet about the corruption and brutality of the Asad regime. Assad and his inner circle cannot respond to these legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people, so they assault a peaceful opposition with appalling violence and terror.

"The Syrian government's violence continues to escalate. The regime is stoking the fears of Syria's minority communities with propaganda about foreign conspiracies and domestic terrorism. Make no mistake: the regime is driving the cycle of violence and sectarianism.

"Peaceful protestors have suffered mass arrests, shabiha thuggery, and extrajudicial execution. But as they are literally beaten off the streets, protestors are learning new forms of peaceful resistance such as boycotts and strikes. Security forces have responded to peaceful civil disobedience with intimidation, vandalism -- and worse. According to the Commission of Inquiry report that we all have before us, security forces systemically use torture and sexual violence, even against children.

"The United States welcomes the forceful report of the Commission of Inquiry. I want to highlight the Commission's recommendations for the immediate admission and protection of human rights monitors; for the unfettered admission of international media; and for the United Nations to continue to take steps to halt the violence in Syria. This special session today, and the resolution before it, move these recommendations forward.

"We once again call on the Syrian regime to immediately admit the Commission of Inquiry and grant it unfettered access throughout Syria. Similarly, Syria must immediately admit Arab League monitors, independent human rights monitors, and humanitarian organizations, with no restrictions on their activities.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms the ongoing slaughter, the arbitrary arrest, and the torture of peaceful protestors. We will continue to work with regional partners and the broader international community to pressure the Asad regime to end the violence against the Syrian people. The Syrian government's abuses have been condemned by leaders of the Arab world, including by the actions taken by the Arab League over the past week; by other international leaders; and by the United Nations, where just over one week ago in a vote in the General Assembly's Third Committee, 122 members of the United Nations stood together to call for an immediate end to the violence in Syria.

"Our message is firm and clear:

"To the people of Syria -- the world stands by you, and we will not ignore your plight in the face of ongoing violence;

"To the Syrian Government -- the time has come to end the flagrant violations of the human rights of your people, and to allow Syrians their right to peacefully and democratically change their government."

You can also find Ambassador Donahue's statement here.

Comments

Comments

DrG
|
West Virginia, USA
December 5, 2011

Dr. G. in West Virginia writes:

Then how come NATO isn't Libyaing Syria?

Zharkov
|
United States
December 5, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Syria isn't Libya, and Russian leaders have an interest in the region that is only now being expressed by sending the Russian navy into the region and selling their latest version cruise missiles to Syria.

As with US and European bankers and defense contractors, Russians sell to both sides of a conflict, copying our example. Iran and Syria present golden, profit-making opportunities. If the Russians were not selling to them, the Chinese would, and if the State Department didn't object, so would our own defense contractors.

Ole
|
New York, USA
December 6, 2011

Ole in New York writes:

@ Mr. Zharkov, Syria IS Libya! Russians sold Libya weapons too. and excuse me, but the West DOESN'T sell arms to totalitarian regimes, only Kremlin and Beijing do. it's a different matter that some of western weaponry may wind up in wrong hands--but it's not a result of our deliberate policies.

And as far as Russia, Dear Madame Secretary, i'm calling on you and the President to express outrage and denounce the current atrocities there, culminating with arrests of opposition poltiicians, especially the corruption buster Alexey Navalny and Ilya Yashin! losing popular support, Kremlin administration is now reverting to outright usurpation of power and political repession, and note that their Syrian activity is coinciding with it! We need to stand with all oppressed people, whether Syrian or Russian!

Yesterday, at a protest against unfair Russian election, i saw a sign "Putin--to Kardin's list'. i totally agree with it: Mr. Putin needs to be banned from entering US, until he clean up his act. that's the least we could do: refuse to interact with such regimes!

deal44
December 7, 2011

W.W. writes:

Assad is not responsible for the killed so Ahamadinejad

either ways the bilderbergs are - as they will be the responsible for the next European revolution

Zharkov
|
United States
December 7, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

@ Ole in New York, you are mistaken that the US never sold to both sides of a conflict.

From the beginning of World War II, Standard Oil had been supplying gasoline to Hitler's troops through North Africa. After the Allied invasion of North Africa, Standard Oil was no longer able to supply its Nazi customers with oil through that route, so Standard began shipping oil to Germany through neutral countries of Spain and Switzerland. It was no coincidence that OSS officers in Spain and Switzerland had close links to Standard Oil.

A State Department Memorandum in August, 1943 shows that trade had been authorized between a Standard Oil subsidiary in Venezuela, the Creole Petroleum Co., and a firm in Aruba, which shipped the oil to Spain and then on to Nazi Germany.

The mainstream news media kept these transactions out of view of the American people, who at the time waited in long lines for gasoline without complaining because they knew our miliary needed fuel to win the war.

In the Vietnam War, the US refused to mine Haiphong Harbor as that would have prevented the Soviets from resupplying the North Vietnamese Army. About the same time, US corporations were building auto factories in the Soviet Union.

Finally, it was our very own State Department that approved shipment of Iran's first nuclear reactor a few years before we sponsored the return of Ayatollah Khomeini to the tune of $60 million dollars.

In our war with Iraq, the WMD nerve gas we accused Saddam of having was reported to have been shipped to him from the US.

John P.
|
Greece
December 7, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Ole in New York

You never address a cartoon name as a Mr. (LOL)

“Syria isn't Libya, and Russian leaders have an interest in the region”.

YES! That’s what we were talking about all these years Z.

You are starting to think…

Zharkov
|
United States
December 7, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

How's your bank account doing in Greece, John?

Are you enjoying globalism yet?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
December 7, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John in Greece,

Selective memory often equates with historical...or in Z's case, hysterical revisionism, modeling cause and effect from a basis of his perceptions of history about as dysfunctional as "The Simsons"- (since a cartoon reference can be actually quite relevent charactarization of Zarkov's logic he's based on events past and present)

See, When one chooses to forget that the Swiss bank-rolled Hitler, then this quote seems pretty reasonable...(chuckle).

----QUOTE;
Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

@ John in Greece, I would like a foreign policy similar to that of Switzerland. It's one country that tries to mind its own business.
----END QUOTE

So TODAY (because those who support Assad the asinine, sell arms to that regime and have ...how should I say, "National interests" in the outcome)...Russia and Iran and even Hisbollah all stand to lose influence in the entire region should Assad be forced from power.

If the Russians wanted to assure themselves of a long-term naval basing opportunity in Syria, they've backed the wrong horse and are now at risk of loosing it, wheras if they took the side of the people and used their mil to mil trade and ties to influence Assad's departure, they might enjoy long term relations with the Syrian people without being told "your lease is up, get out!" once Assad falls from power at the hands of the people.

And to directly address the point I think "Z" was trying to make in his politically warped commentary; Just as it has taken years for nations to divest themselves of economic ties with Iran under sanction, so it did too with Hitler's Germany, as US/German relations in the 30's into the early 40's can be viewed in similar disfunction as the EU's economic ties with Iran while the hand-wringing over whether or not to sever all imports and exports of petroleum products with Iran continue in political circles.

---

Regarding Syria;

"We don't kill our people… no government in the world kills its people, unless it's led by a crazy person," -Bashar Al-Assad

Mmmm... John, Z says he gets payback when folks respond to his posts, and WW said he was going to "invite Syria and Iran" to participate on this blog because my posts inspired him so much...(chuckle)...do you suppose...maybe, just maybe,...Now that we're witness to a confession made in denial, that Assad actually read or was notified of this little gem I wrote?

It is true that the crazy often see themselves as sane, no?

---excerpts---

And the whole world is asking, "Can I get a witness?" inside Syria..., while the dogs of war do their thing...,

...pissing on the infrastructure of civilization and people's hope and dreams.

No government in its right mind would shred the fabric of its own social order and thus one must conclude that as soon as Assad can be declared criminally insane, the sooner the international community can reserve for him a rubber room in a locked down institutional setting, ...or a hidy hole if he insists on such a fate.

Let us see what artful solution the spirit of nations comes up with, when nobody gets to wage war on their people like this ever again.

Lest folks stand idly by and insist on non-interference and be accessory to murder."

Or this;

"...and what if any decisions have been made with regards to Assad the asinine and his army of ethical infants, now that the Arab league has weighed in on the malfuntion of "behavior change" with considerable sanctions."

- EJ

...When Assad said;

"I don't own them, I am president, I don't own the country so they are not my forces."

-Bashar Al-Assad

---

So, it would appear at least on the intellectual surface of things that this blog actually has a pretty wide range of readership including the leaders of foreign governments, but the evidence is purely circumstantial at best...and "you never know who reads these things"...but by God I'm going to have some fun with this!

It's that "Ranger training school" approach I take to everything that sucks, including attitudinal malfunctioning ethical infants in complete denial of the obvious.

Best,

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
December 8, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A.

Just for the record, you are right about my bank account, but I don’t blame globalization.

On the contrary, it’s about “local political stupidity”.

I don’t use to comment on comments having to do with Greece through DipNote, because I respect the hospitality of the SD and after all, I am here because I love America and not representing Greece.

However, in this case I think that I can give you an answer to your ironical fraud of realism, because what you say is absolutely (100%) wrong.

Crisis in Greece –and I’m talking only about Greece, not the so called “PIGS crisis” as a phenomenon etc.- has only to do with local viruses and certainly not with the globalization idea you Z regularly fight.

If you ask the Greek people “who is responsible for the crisis?”, fortunately for the first time in modern history you will have to face a 90% view described in three words:

Local Political Stupidity, Corruption, “Blue Wall’.

And this happened for many decades.

Nobody will reply to you that globalization fetched the financial crisis.

Except if you belong in the 10% of the left wing that always attributes any crisis to “globalization, U.S.A. and Israel”. But that’s why they are only 10%. Even kids know they have no logic, moreover any argument.

It’s what Eric says: “too many talks, no works”.

Let me give you a small example of what ‘Political Stupidity, Corruption and “Blue Wall’’ means. This you’ll make you understand that globalization has nothing to do with my bank account.

Several years ago, a previous Greek Administration had the fine idea –thank God for once- to ask the U.S.A. help (officially) on how to fight tax evasion. IRS guys came and started building a great, sophisticated, hi-end technology computerized system, while they were working on offering the know-how and strategy of the whole project.

Unfortunately, the U.S. team did not know about the public sector corruption and its “blue wall”. And of course the “political stupidity” did not offer them any help. The guys used to work for 16-18 hours a day.

They did all the “computer work”, the system used to work, but unfortunately every new morning they had to face sabotages. They used to upload code the previous night, but they soon enough understood that the “blue wall” was using the same cable to erase things and archives in order to sabotage the TAXIS.

The guys were patient, but after some time they understood that they should give an end to this craziness. They met with the “political stupidity” and they just said:

- You invited us here. Do you want it or not? Make up…

They took no serious answer. So, they also took their air tickets at hand… back to America, saying:

- Next time you call us, be sure you want it!

A little fiction in this story; maybe plenty of truth though.

And now I have to run to the banks for my loans. But, I won’t cry. And for sure I won’t blame the globalization idea.

Zharkov
|
United States
December 8, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

@ Eric, you may want to look up the dictionary definition of "megalomania" before attributing Assad's comments to your posts.

Also, you might try reading a little about US history, particularly the nice little booklet written by USMC General Butler to get you started thinking.

Zharkov
|
United States
December 8, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Greece wasn't insolvent before it joined the European Union and abandoned its national currency, so globalism has to be an element of Greece's problem.

Greece existed for over a thousand years without needing EU leadership and EU funny money. People in Greece may not know why their country is in trouble but they should know that it managed to survive before it joined the EU.

To clarify, there is National Socialism and International Socialism. Globalists are basically Fabian Socialists, in case you are wondering why there are no elections of EU leaders and no elections of UN representatives, and why democracy is just another word used by the EU rather than a reality.

I would refer you to speeches made by EU representative Nigel Farage to clarify your reality.

The solution is elementary. When nations are sovereign independent entities, the collapse of one nation's economy need not doom the other nations to the same fate. If collapse occurs between independent but closely linked trading partners, they may fail sequentially, not simultaneously.

When nations are linked together in a world government, single world bank and global economy, the collapse of one will easily bring down the others simultaneously, particularly because they have the same currency, same government, same banking system, and similar inability to pay their debts.

The concept of "global community" or "globalism" has fueled economic collapse across the globe.

Greece may initially blame itself, as did Iceland, but the culprit is the concept and the corruption inherent in that concept of global governance. Greece, like Iceland, still has a choice whether to be slaves to their debt or allow the bankers to reap the bitter harvest of their risk.

John P.
|
Greece
December 8, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A.

With all the respect, you don’t know what you are talking about.

You are the one who needs some 101 history lessons.

Just a few:

1. Do you know that the official Greek country was formed after 1821?

2. Do you know that loans taken in 1822-3-4 are loans that were get paid in 2009?

3. Do you know what loan-recycling means? You take a second loan to pay your first one and it goes. This is what happened for almost 200 years.

4. Do you know that the inflation in Greece was 25% in 1980?

I won’t go any further. I could provide you plenty of other things you don’t know, but... that's OK.

Just a last one.

I wonder if you know the meaning of the word “megalomanis” –the guy who suffers from “megalomania”.

Why do you think that Assad is “greater” than Eric? Do you believe that a killer is stronger than a thinker?

I disagree! I think Assad should buy Eric’s book concerning political stupidity and soon enough, I predict for your Syrian heroe that you’ll understand that Eric was right…

Best,
John

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
December 8, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Zharkov,

I feel I must remind you that you've missed the point;

"I think the point of this blog is to amuse bored officials..."

Well I can't speak for officials, but you certainly amuse me.

But what really amuses me is the talent I seem to possess for pre-empting the arguments of dictators and ethical infants because this is not the first time I've done so in writing, and it remains a statistical curiosity should any official in this government wish to count the number of times I've done so on the record in the archives of this blog.

Now it is possible that officials of this (or any other) gov. might find amusement (or wisdom) in my thoughts, but then again they may simply inspire them to think.

To which I should add that I first read "War is a Racket" as a young man in the mid 70's, when air travel had made the world smaller and oceans no longer protected us from intercontinental ballistic missiles.

Today the internet puts the speed of thought at near light-speed and the immediacy of globalization is upon us in real time (or a second or two delay time in vid. conferencing from halfway around the world).

Yet it is a curious thing that the speed of thought may not be limited by technology, as would seem my muse thinks faster than light-speed, folds back time, and pre-empts ethical infant's political stupidity even before the words dribble out from the depths of their psycotic reasoning.

Thus seeing how it may be a "given" that one who controls the debt of a nation may control the course of conflict I introduced a concept and a plan of action to bill the government of Iran 32 trillion dollars to directly address it's malevolence before they managed to provoke a shooting war with us.

Simply because if chanting "Death to America" every Friday at prayers for the last 32 years isn't a billable offense, I don't know what is, and that resolving our deficit shouldn't be done on the backs of the American people when there's no excuse not to place that burden upon the backs of our adversaries to convince them that such a war as they wish to wage with us can never be profitable for them when bancruptcy becomes a dead certainty by pre-emption of their spoken intent.

You seem to think globalization is a function of economics, but in reality it exists as much more than that.

"Today there is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence. It is either nonviolence or nonexistence. I feel that we've got to look at this total thing anew and recognize that we must live together. That the whole world now it is one--not only geographically but it has to become one in terms of brotherly concern. Whether we live in America or Asia or Africa we are all tied in a single garment of destiny and whatever effects one directly, effects one in-directly."

MLK had it down to a science of the human condition way back in '67 when he said this, and you are still thinking about things at dial-up speed Z, and that's unfortunate.

Isolationism ain't the way to create a better world, never has been, never will be.

But there are those who cling to a sense of self rightious nationalism, theocratic national socialism, and threaten the peace of nations in ideological demise of people's hopes and dreams.

Those who seek to promote non intervention in tyrant's affairs simply assure war will become reality for themselves and others unwittingly as a product of unintended concequence.

What Gen. Butler failed to understand is how a people may profit from obtaining and/or maintaining their freedom, which isn't something solely defined by GDP, corporate profits, nor the debt of nations,...nor even the price in blood paid to preserve freedom for ourselves and others.

If I had 1$ (US) for every time my words have proven themselves worthy upon their own merit over time, I wouldn't have to worry about my bank account and John in Greece wouldn't need to ask for a loan, because I'd have a million or two to simply give away...(chuckle).

That it may amuse officials to profit by them is of no concern to me. It's not about the money.

EJ

Zharkov
|
United States
December 8, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

"I introduced a concept and a plan of action to bill the government of Iran 32 trillion dollars to directly address it's malevolence." - Eric in NM.

Really, Eric, you are also quite amusing.

John in Greece, how many runs on Greek banks occurred between 1950 and 2011? When was the last time the Drachma collapsed? I think the facts speak for themselves on the outcome of EU membership.

Greece has NEVER been worse off than it is today. Whether you agree or not, most EU members think so. The EU won't even risk letting the Greek public vote on debt repayment because they already know how hated the EU is among the public of most member nations. Even the most ignorant citizens know that incurring more debt will not solve a debt problem. The Euro is doomed, along with the EU. It's merely a matter of time before the whole termite-ridden economic structure collapses and nations return to sanity by reissuing their currency and reasserting their sovereignty.

As for Assad, I never wrote that he was "greater" than Eric, but he is chief executive of Syria and has enough advisors already. If Assad did read this blog, he might post an email address so Eric can further advise him.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
December 9, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

"I introduced a concept and a plan of action to bill the government of Iran 32 trillion dollars to directly address it's malevolence." - Eric in NM.

Really, Eric, you are also quite amusing.

@ Zharkov,

I'm glad you're amused, thing is everyone I've talked with in the US gov. about this concept has offered their thanks and been willing to pass the idea onward to their repective bosses, including Wendy Sherman's office (Undersecretary for Political affairs @ State) and done so after giving me adequate time to offer my reasoning and logic in the matter with respect for my taking the time to come up with a solution and offer it to them.

The sense I get from one and all is that I really have given folks something completely new to think about and they arn't laughing Z, because it is worthy of consideration.

That this has never been tried before, or seems outside of the norms of possibility, I freely admit some may find the concept amusing, but then the dire national security threats it addresses arn't amusing at all, and the idea was tendered in a serious manner.

Would you rather us simply go to war with Iran without this idea being tried first?

That is a distinct option when "all options are on the table".

Well now folks have one more to consider.

Now beyond the domestic effect this idea may have on resolving the deficit, (at least on paper subject to collection) I never went into why the President may find interest in it from any other domestic political consideration than that, but if the concept does become a part of his overall strategic policy towards Iran, I was thinking a bit about the effect this might have on public thinking in America both in the press and among the public and among political parties.

First of all in order to become policy, the concepts probability of success would logicly have to be equal to or greater than the possibility that sanctions alone can actually produce the desired "behavior change" from Iran's leadership, and provide sufficiant added financial pressure on Iran as to achieve that goal in tandem with sanctions, as well as providing a general "third track" approach that may be implemented under the existing laws of the US gov.

I wouldn't have posed the idea in the first place if I didn't think it had a high probability of meeting all the above criteria, I'm not doing this for mine or anyone else's amusement, even if if it does amuse a few folks to think about.

Point is to get results...period.

And hell if nations start billing each other for their political stupidity rather than going to war because a precedent has been set by example, then even you might agree that's probably a better way to resolve disputes among nations.

Now President Obama has been hammered by GOP candidates of late over deficit spending and an Iran policy that seems to be getting nowhere fast enough to stop Iran from building nuclear weapons and fielding them (less than 1 year out by some estimates) and the entire government knows we're at a critical juncture and little time for any new santion or initiative to have effect befor the President will be forced to make a decision he doesn't want to have to make, in taking that last option off the table and taking a kinetic approach to Iran's nuclear infrastructure and removing it's gov by force (as to leave the gov. intact to retaliate is foolhardy)

So, between the domestic national security threat of a 15 + trillion dollar deficit and the terrorist threat posed by Iran with a glow in the dark capability, should the President be able to resolve both before election time, he'll be regarded as a political genius if he can actually make this idea work.

Not to mention the fact that he'll get re-elected by the widest majority in American history.

Now let's say the Arab leage were to bill Assad's regime a trillion dollars per day for every day his minions continue to kill Syrians in the streets simply because the whole world is sick of being witness to it...what then?

When I said I was introducing a concept, I meant it to have very broad application, not as any so called "unilateral action" on our part. When Karzai and the Afghan gov. start billing Pakistan a trillion dollars for every suicide bombing that occurs as a result of Pakistan's failure to stop supporting terrorist org's, then what?

You are now starting to understand just how much political stupidity can cost folks? And how to eliminate any profiteering from war when governments are forced into bankruptcy and can't get bailed out by the IMF because of the liens placed upon them in an international court?

This is going to take time to become manifest, but we don't have much time left to set an example.

But neither you nor anyone else has come up with a better idea to resolve the concepts of war, terrorism, and dictorial genocide as we know it and put them all into the dusbin of history.

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
December 9, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A.

I agree with you concerning the EU and Euro. I have written in the past that it’s a question of time to collapse due to lack of political, strategic and ideological unity.

But, these are my words and I may be wrong. I’ m an amateur.

Even if we assume that I am right, what the END of EU has to do with blaming the terms “globalization” and “federal administration”?

EU may be a bad model, but globalization and federal systems of governing are still a great, unique platform. It’s the only one that can guide us to the new millennium.

That’s why I agree with Eric on this. It’s a one way road. Things changed. You cannot be isolated.

QUOTE: Isolationism ain't the way to create a better world, never has been, never will be. END OF QUOTE.

He is right!

Let’s assume once again that all these medium level central Europe’s politicians did not make it to create a federal power called Europe. Well, according to my poor opinion this was the "expected", but it does
not prove the unexpected success of a new effort with different players.

Let’s make it fiction. Why can’t you dream of a new “fed experiment” joined by U.S.A., west Med countries, Israel and England?

It sounds crazy right? But it proves that globalization can still work.

Another example:

You talk about local currency in general and Drachma in case of Greece –for people who do not know, it used to be the Greek official currency before Euro. By the way Z, Drachma was never a strong "coin'.

Why don’t you think of a new idea? We can create the Greek $, the Italian $, the Spanish $ etc. connect them to the U.S. $ which is the strongest currency on planet and then… magically we can have a “global coin” full of life.

This sounds crazy x 2, right?

But it proves that globalization can still work as long as you choose the right partners, right politicians and right platform.

My dear friend Z you should start thinking of the “river effect”. This can make you change your views about globalization and fed systems which -I repeat myself- are a one way road.

Imagine we have 3 different villages in a vertical orientation with a river floating from 1 to 3. Village no1 has a very good administration that cares about the environment and makes its best to secure pollution.
Village no3 has also a great Administration also caring about things.

The problem is that Village no2 in-between 1 and 3 has a tyrant that only cares about money, power and his chair. He and his gang pollute the river.

As a result Village no1 feels weak to stop the flow in order to save Village no3 that “collects” the stupidity of the tyrant. (end of example)

Everyone would be happier within a globalized system that would have exterminated the tyrant of Village no2 and of course not the People, although they should have taken their future more seriously, kicking him(them) out of there.

P.S.:

You still believe that Assad and his company are better than Eric... Do you think that he has advisors, or brains like EJ? If he had, he wouldn’t be suffering now. They used to say in a movie that… –I’ll change it- A tunnel where you hide says always the truth… I think Eric is right, so I bet on NM waiting to see a new Syrian “hero” hiding in tunnels.

The future is near...

Zharkov
|
United States
December 9, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

@ John in Greece:

A federal system of government worked in America until recently, because each state had many things in common.

We speak the same language, have a common thirst for liberty and a republican form of conservative government, financial freedom, and a strong desire for a federal government that was relatively tiny compared with state governments, and a Bill of Rights that we can all agree is valuable to protecting our freedom. Our 10th Amendment guaranteed the rights of each member state of the Union for good reason - to maintain state sovereignty.

America's colonies, and now states, also had in common with Britain the same common law including the Magna Carta and except for Louisiana, the same kind of judicial system.

The EU had none of these characteristics, so a federal system for Europe was destined to fail in a maze of disagreements and disputes, with some nations feeling abandoned and others feeling exploited. And that should have been expected. Nations are formed because their people and cultures are different.

Globalists celebrate diversity except when it comes to Europe. Europe is to be regimented into a federal government (and then a world government) against the will of their own citizens, and that is simply wrong even if it was a workable solution.

The real solution is to maintain national sovereignty and encourage nationalism because that is what distinguishes one European state from another. France will never agree with Britain or Spain on most issues, and Germans do not wish to be under a Brussels government and forced to bail out weaker members.

Would Greece citizens be content to be governed by Mexico or China? Well, no, and I don't have to be Greek to say so.

Liberalizing trade and travel can be done by treaty, not by decree, and does not require a federal system in order to obtain free trade and loosen controls on citizens of Europe.

Germans will NEVER submit to dictates from France, Belgium, or Spain, applied through EU central government. Germans want to be Germans, not merely Europeans. They have a national pride, as do Greeks, Italians, and possibly even the French although French immigration policies suggest otherwise, at least several prominent French politicians feel more "French" than usual.

Nations in Europe can have every benefit promised by the EU without actually joining an EU. It can all be done by treaty and custom, not by mandate. Globalism stinks, and the world-wide collapse makes that clear.

It is not a question of isolation, but one of insulating each nation against the corruption and misfortunes of their neighbors. This can best be done by keeping sovereign, individual nation states with separate, individual banking systems, rather than a federation.

Maureen
|
Massachusetts, USA
December 9, 2011

Maureen in Massachusetts writes:

@Eric in New Mexico

@John in Greece

Very interesting comments to this post-Have been following. Thanks

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