Travel Diary: Secretary Clinton Travels to South Korea and Burma

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
November 28, 2011
Secretary Clinton Waves While Boarding Airplane

More:Background Briefing on Secretary Clinton's Participation in the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness | Trip Page | Travel Map

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will travel to the Republic of Korea and Burma from November 30 to December 2, 2011.

Secretary Clinton will travel to Busan, Republic of Korea November 30 to attend the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness. Secretary Clinton's participation reflects the United States' strong political commitment to development as key pillar of global security, prosperity, and democratic progress. The Busan Meeting represents a landmark opportunity for world leaders to take stock of recent changes in the development landscape and chart a new course for global cooperation. Her visit also underscores the breadth and depth of the U.S.-ROK partnership.

Secretary Clinton will then travel to Nay Pyi Taw and Rangoon, Burma, from November 30 - December 2. This historic trip will mark the first visit to Burma by a U.S. Secretary of State in over a half a century. Secretary Clinton will underscore the U.S. commitment to a policy of principled engagement and direct dialogue as part of our dual-track approach. She will register support for reforms that we have witnessed in recent months and discuss further reforms in key areas, as well as steps the U.S. can take to reinforce progress. She will consult with a broad and diverse group of civil society and ethnic minority leaders to gain their perspectives on developments in the country. Counselor Cheryl Mills, Assistant Secretary Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary Michael Posner, Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma Derek Mitchell, and Policy Planning Director Jake Sullivan will accompany her.

Comments

Comments

John B.
|
India
November 30, 2011

John B. in India writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

Please press the issue on human rights before the regime. For too long, human rights winds up in quotation marks as bargaining chips in realpolitik and the reality gets lost in rhetoric. I have seen and continue to see the results of this with refugee populations from Latin America, Tibet and Burma.

Human rights. Without them, there's no polity, just despotism.

Keep up the good fight,
John B

Rev. M.
|
Illinois, USA
November 30, 2011

Rev. Carol M. in Illinois writes:

Secretary Clinton, I urge you to include stopping human rights abuses and violence against ethnic minorities as a top priority concern for the U.S. in Burma. My congregation in Chicago includes over 100 refugees from the horrific violence perpetrated by the military in eastern Burma...rape, forced labor, destruction of villages, land mines in farm fields, and more. During 2011 the attacks have worsened in Kachin State, resulting in more displaced people than any other time in the last 10 years. True democracy and peace cannot come to Burma until the human rights abuses against the ethnic minorities are halted and a just peace negotiated.

Johpa D.
|
Thailand
November 30, 2011

Johpa D. in Thailand writes:

As an American citizen marrid to a Karen, my view, Madame Secretary, is that unless you are willing to push hard, very hard, for the release of all political prisoners, your trip will only encourage the current military dictatorship that is enagaged in the wholesale plunder of the Burmese State. Where to next? North Korea?

devlin
|
New Zealand
November 30, 2011

Devlin in New Zealand writes:

Please stand up for the Burmese people. Please stand with AungSanSuKyi

the Burmese people need the support of a leader such as yourself.

Richard S.
|
Colorado, USA
November 30, 2011

Richard S. in Colorado writes:

I am traveling to Myanmar in March of 2012 and was encouraged by your comments which would allow for a more open policy by the USA towards Myanmar. I am citizen of the USA with voting and domicile in Denver, Colorado. I am currently residing in Thailand and traveling in Asia. My travels in Asia have helped to expand my views on US foreign policy. I have waited to travel to Myanmar till a more democratic government is in place. With the return of Aung San Suu Kyi to political process in Myanmar I am greatly encouraged. I think the USA should lift sanctions imposed on Myanmar. If the government takes a turn back to the military control we can impose further sanctions.

I read with great interest Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s article in Foreign Policy, “America’s Pacific Century”. As she stated the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) the importance of a level playing field. I would underscore the importance of a level playing field with Asian economies especially in the need for environmental controls. If such controls are not accepted by all parties we will continue to see corporations doing business in those countries with lowest wages and lack of environmental regulations. The world can not afford an increase in pollution. You only have to look at the increase in cars in China to see the effects. When I first traveled to China it was mostly bikes on latter trips motorbikes and now cars. In the USA we must lead by example transportation exists now in the USA which can lead to reduce our own carbon footprint.

In my recent trips to China I have noted with great interest the economic climate of China and especially the behavior of China towards its SE Asian neighbors. I suspect that many countries will be faced with balancing the security of US military balanced with trade with China. I believe we must consider the economic necessity in military reductions with respect to sending our forces abroad. I strongly believe that the government of China will be do all in its power to see that what it sees as Chinese resources of the South China Sea are within Chinese Control. This must be settled by continual dialogue and negotiation amongst all effected countries. I do think we must work to strengthen our alliances with SE Asia as well as China. This does not mean military intervention. This is far too important not to use every diplomatic means at our disposal.

I suggest we consider the following with respect to strengthening our ties with SE Asian countries. I think the USA would gain much good will in further assisting in cleanup of its many landmines from the Vietnam War which still exist in many places in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Japan has been of great help furnishing economic and technical assistance for which the SE Asian countries are greatly appreciative. The help rendered by the USA is inadequate given the magnitude of the problem. I have seen far too many instances of children and adults in these countries without legs and arms from a war which ended many decades ago. It is also very difficult for SE Asian tourists to visit the USA on a US tourist visa. I feel we need to reform this process and lead by example I feel it is only through dialogue and understanding that we will gain respect from this important part of the world. These are just two of the many lost cost options available to the USA.

Tom
|
Australia
November 30, 2011

Tom in Australia writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

The call for help from the Burmese people has been unanswered for too long. Few people in the world could truly make such a profound difference in the lives of so many millions, as you can now. Your actions could deliver liberty and justice for this generation and many to come.

I thank you for your strength and service to humanity.

Nyi A.
|
Thailand
November 30, 2011

Nyi Nyi A. in Thailand writes:

Dear Madam Secretary,

Under these circumstances, I would like to urge you to use your smart power to influence the military-backed civilian government to take a true democratic path, secure immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners, stop human rights violations, cease civil wars and bring about genuine peace in Burma.

John H.
|
New York, USA
November 30, 2011

John H. in New York writes:

When in Burma, do not forget the growing conflicts and human rights abuses in ethnic areas. More people have been displaced this year than any other in the past decade. A genuine national dialogue of reconciliation must happen to bring peace to Burma.

Please push for the release of all political prisoners and for a lifting of the extreme laws that keep people locked up and perpetuate the climate of fear in the country.

Thank you.

Molly N.
|
Oregon, USA
November 30, 2011

Molly N. in Oregon writes:

Please form a U.N. watch for Burma as Aung San was brutally killed after winning elections. Su'u Kyi needs our total support. It will take time for Burmese to get used to living without fear.

Brian G.
|
California, USA
November 30, 2011

Brian and Deborah G. in California write:

November 30, 2011

7:21 PM, San Leandro, CA, USA

Dear Secretary of State Clinton--

Salutations.

We are very happy to hear that you are visiting Burma. Please help the ethnic minority groups, especially the Kachin, Karen, and Shan ethnic minority groups-- please protect them from the abuses and atrocities at the hands of the Burmese military and soldiers.

Please seek to broker a cease fire between the Burmese government and soldiers and Kachin Independence Army (KIA) in their civil war. The Burmese military is sending thousands of soldiers to Northern Burma, Kachin State, to kill, rape, torture, and beat Kachin people and to burn down Kachin villages, and Shan and Karen villages even though peace talks are taking place between the Burmese government and the KIA and the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO). The Burmese military is still trying to wipe out the Kachin race and other ethnic minority groups, such as the Karen and Shan.

The Burmese government lies all of the time. The Burmese government says it wants peace with the ethnic minority groups but they always attack them. The mouth of the Burmese government and military say they want peace, but their hands and feet say that they want war and they try to kill, beat, torture, and rape all of the ethnic minority groups, especially the Kachin, Karen, and Shan!!!

Please help by brokering a cease fire and stopping the Burmese government and military from committing human rights abuses and atrocities against the Kachin, Karen, and Shan ethnic minority groups.

You cannot trust the Burmese government and military to be truthful and honest. They lie all of the time and consistently beat, tortured, rape and murder Kachin, Karen and Shan ethnic minorities. Please speak up for these ethnic minorities-- please look beyond Rangoon and the Burmese capital. Please look at what is happening in Northern Burma, Kachin State, where the Burmese government and military are presently trying to wipe out, with ethnic cleansing, the Kachin ethnic minority group with beatings, tortures, rape, and murders. The Burmese government is treating its own people with killings, tortures, beatings, and rapes worse than Gaddahfi treated his own people in Libya before he was chased down by NATO and the Libya Freedom Fighters and killed. Please intervene on behalf of the ethnic minorities in Burma, such as the Kachin, Karen, and Shan peoples.

Please help the Kachin, Karen, Shan ethnic minorities, please protect them, please, please, please....We need your very important assistance and expertise!!!

Thank you for all of your efforts to bring peace, democracy, harmony, and hope to Burma and its people. Thank you for everything!!!

May GOD Bless you always and protect you. Amen.

Take care.

Best wishes,

Brian and Deborah G.

Rev. S.
|
Canada
November 30, 2011

Rev. Ian S. in Canada writes:

Dear Sec. Clinton: Please keep up the pressure on the Burmese government to re-establish full human rights. Thank you.

daily23
December 1, 2011

W.W. writes:

Love and hugs for mrs Secretary and Burma...

thank the Lord for sending Mrs.Secretary

wm. c.
|
Washington, USA
December 1, 2011

W.C. in Canada writes:

let the burmaies crimenals know only peacefull & quick reigem change will save them from international justis. aloha.

Susan L.
|
Illinois, USA
December 1, 2011

Susan L. in Illinois writes:

Please strongly promote an end to ethnic cleansing and the use of rape as a weapon of war. Please push for the release of all political prisoners.

Sneef
|
Thailand
December 1, 2011

Sneef in Thailand writes:

Dear Sec. Clinton,

As a concerned citizen I call on you to deliver a message to the Burmese regime that US policy towards Burma will only change when all remaining political prisoners are released, there is a genuine ceasefire, human rights violations end, those responsible are held to account and there are serious efforts towards national reconciliation. This could be a moment of hope for the desperate Burmese people, and your message holds the key to real reform.

satrupa k.
|
New Mexico, USA
December 1, 2011

Satrupa K. in New Mexico writes:

Secretary Clinton,

I know that you know what the TRUTH is in Burma.

I understand the agenda of the USA and what you are supposed to accomplish there.

THAT does NOT mean that you cannot quietly take the Generals aside and INSIST that RAPE by the military STOP NOW. AND that CHILDREN be LEFT OUT OF THE BRUTALITY ALTOGETHER. THAT MUCH YOU CAN DO, by the strength of your person. Eye to Eye. Face to Face. JUST AT LEAST DO THAT.

Ariane S.
|
Florida, USA
December 1, 2011

Ariane S. in Florida writes:

I had the opportunity to travel to Burma in 2004 and to work in a refugee camp on the Thai/Burma border. I urge you to look beyond Rangoon & call attention to the atrocities occurring RIGHT NOW in the ethnic minority regions. The brute force, forced labor, land mines, and rape are unacceptable behaviors that the government sees fit to exercise it's power. Do not let the military regime forget that these behaviors are unacceptable & the U.S. will demonstrate there are consequences for those actions. The Burmese people have waited quietly while the world turns a blind eye. You must bring light to the political priosoners & call for their release!

Jessica L.
|
Kentucky, USA
December 1, 2011

Jessica L. in Kentucky writes:

Please consider pressuring Burma to release all political prisoners!

John D.
|
Australia
December 1, 2011

John D. in Australia writes:

Please make it clear to Burmese authorities that, while recent progress is welcome, the rest of thw world cannot accept the continued imprisonment of political prisoners and the other abuses of human roghts that are part and parcel of this dictatorial regime.

Dorothy C.
|
Colorado, USA
December 1, 2011

Dorothy Ann C. in Colorado writes:

I've been to Myanmar 5 times , the 1st as a tourist and fell in love with the people. Since I've worked with a few different NGO's and started an orphanage project in Sittwae.

I"m counting on you to figure out if they are sincere in being more democratic and willing to release all political prisoners.

I just returned on the 23 from working with Rotary International on Water purification projects for Non Governmental orphangaes to have pure water and test for the ability to restart Rotary.

Good luck for all of us.

Dot Cada

ElenaMDiLapi
|
Pennsylvania, USA
December 1, 2011

Elena D. in Pennsylvania writes:

Please be strong with military junta....release ALL political prisoners...talk privately with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi listento her advice on how we can support her and her supporters. Meet with the Womens League of Burma...no us support until these issues and the burmese people are free. Please try to visit refugee camps on the Thai burns boarders. Speak with academics...trust edcommunity. leaders people. How can I help?

SAFE TRIPS.

David W.
|
Maine, USA
December 1, 2011

David W. in Maine writes:

Dear Madame Secretary,

Please remember on this historic trip the import your visit has upon the Burmese people who have been isolated for decades and ground under the heel of the military junta that has denied them their human rights and suppressed their democratically elected leader, Aung Sang Suu Kyi. You must show them, as the champion of liberty the US promotes itself as, that your official visit as US Sec. of State is a firm demand for the restoration of human and political rights in Burma, the unconditional release of all political prisoners and the complete end of ethnic slave labor before any US aid can be forthcoming. Your presence can be an inspiration for the Burmese people who have been struggling for too many years, a sign that freedom from military rule is within their reach and that the US of A stands with them.

Cindy
|
Colorado, USA
December 1, 2011

Cindy in Colorado writes:

I have met so many refugees here who long to return to "their" Burma! But they would be killed or horded into refugee camps. How can an uneducated manipultor continue to lead such a country? Why is this little man allowed to create and carry out such greedy and cruel "cleanses"

Treva H.
|
Ohio, USA
December 1, 2011

Treva H. in Ohio writes:

I have read about Burma, but now I hear first hand about the abuse the military inflicted on Burmese citizens. I work with many Burmese refugees, and their stories of being terrorized by the Burmese Army makes this a very personal issue. My friends have many obstacles to overcome: language, culture, environment, and negative attitudes. There are many more still being terrorized in Burma. I find it very interesting that they do not refer to their country as "Myanmar".

jenny g.
|
New Zealand
December 1, 2011

Jenny G. in New Zealand writes:

Now is the time,to free Burmese people now not later, it cannot come soon enough. Brutal Burmese regimes make ordinary citizens lives hell, what hope have the Burmese if the USA cant significantly help the plight of people there. We all suffer, when democracy is not upheld, The world recognizes that the Burmese need help now, and a superpower can do a lot to motivate the corruption of the Junta to stop traumatizing the ethnic groups and political prisoners, and every citizen wanting democracy and basic human rights in Burma.

Albert V.
|
New Zealand
December 1, 2011

Albert V. in New Zealand writes:

Don't go soft on them generals BEFORE they've actually delivered anything!

Rebecca D.
|
California, USA
December 1, 2011

Rebecca D. in California writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

I urge you to firmly request the freedom of all political prisoners in Burma as well as an end to the atrocities committed against the Burmese people by the military regime.

Kei T.
|
Delaware, USA
December 1, 2011

Kei T. in Delaware writes:

Dear Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton,

As you visit Burma please help and address the people suffering and being unfairly treated in this country, there is many concerns amony many people including myself on this issue especially now because you are visiting. Please help them or do anything you can.

Thank you

Sincerely,
Kei T.

K. C.
|
Ireland
December 1, 2011

K. Carey in Ireland writes:

The Secretary of State should use this visit as an opportunity to continue to pressure the leaders of Burma to release all political prisoners, truly embrace democracy, respect humand rights and move forward to becoming full partners in the international community

Esteban D.
|
Belgium
December 1, 2011

Esteban D. in Belgium writes:

Secretary Clinton,

Please keep up the pressure on the Burmese regime to put an end to violations of human rights, release all political prisoners and end the targeted violence against ethnic groups.

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