Travel Diary: Secretary Clinton Travels to South Korea and Burma

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
November 28, 2011
Secretary Clinton Waves While Boarding Airplane

More:Background Briefing on Secretary Clinton's Participation in the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness | Trip Page | Travel Map

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will travel to the Republic of Korea and Burma from November 30 to December 2, 2011.

Secretary Clinton will travel to Busan, Republic of Korea November 30 to attend the Fourth High-Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness. Secretary Clinton's participation reflects the United States' strong political commitment to development as key pillar of global security, prosperity, and democratic progress. The Busan Meeting represents a landmark opportunity for world leaders to take stock of recent changes in the development landscape and chart a new course for global cooperation. Her visit also underscores the breadth and depth of the U.S.-ROK partnership.

Secretary Clinton will then travel to Nay Pyi Taw and Rangoon, Burma, from November 30 - December 2. This historic trip will mark the first visit to Burma by a U.S. Secretary of State in over a half a century. Secretary Clinton will underscore the U.S. commitment to a policy of principled engagement and direct dialogue as part of our dual-track approach. She will register support for reforms that we have witnessed in recent months and discuss further reforms in key areas, as well as steps the U.S. can take to reinforce progress. She will consult with a broad and diverse group of civil society and ethnic minority leaders to gain their perspectives on developments in the country. Counselor Cheryl Mills, Assistant Secretary Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary Michael Posner, Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma Derek Mitchell, and Policy Planning Director Jake Sullivan will accompany her.

Comments

Comments

palgye
|
South Korea
November 28, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

South Korea in time for tomorrow night, 8:00 South Korea's Samsung (e) and Japan's Softbank will be held in Taiwan's baseball game going, I'm tired, even a small taste to Japanese in order to present, Japan's Softbank hope to win so bad.

However, the Japanese people do not forget to revenge.

Put hot money in China as in Europe, Japan, as the money wants to invest. For rehabilitation and containment.

So, just think it's abandoned in garbage dumps, i`m.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
November 29, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Palgye,

Good to see you back on the blog my friend, I was just thinking that one man's trash is another man's treasure.

And often happiness is like finding a bright pearl in a pile of,....dung.

(chuckle)

EJ

Nay T.
|
Illinois, USA
November 29, 2011

Nay Min T. in Illinois writes:

Dear Sir

We support a step towards to reform Burma.

We believe its our principles to remind

To release each and every innocent Human rights prisoner,

To stop persecuting minorities, war against ethnics.

To announce and distribute Universal Human rights deceleration for every Burmese citizens. So that Burmese people will know what rights they have and demand regardless of any Burma constitution. These steps must take immediate action before any reform. or to start in progress to reform. the mission will make no difference If the Burmese Junta Gov fails to release innocents people and to stop persecuting minorities. Burma is always left behind for past Four U.S President since, 1988 and its the great opportunities for this time to productive plan

We believe President Obama have a hopes and a plans to end Political Games by Burma Regime and we support the cause just to free 60 millions people of freedom. United.

A.S / FWG

Pete G.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Pete G. in the U.K. writes:

It's good that the US is engaging with Burma however the Secretary of State should be robust in calling for more democracy and the installation of civilian law. This regime is still oppressing many of it's people. The US should not recognise the existing Junta or sell it any military equipment.

Nikolaus S.
|
Germany
November 30, 2011

Dr. Nikolaus S. in Germany writes:

I am very concerned that this trip might serve the junta in buttressing its claims to legitimacy. Hence, it will be important to meet with Aung Sang Suu Kyi and other opposision members from Burma. Rather than representatives of the brutal government.

Patrick L.
|
Canada
November 30, 2011

Patrick J. in Canada writes:

Dear Miss Clinton,

I wonder if you realize there are a lot more people around the world who would vote for you if they could... Your mandate is much larger then USA... I hope President Obama and yourself will make a difference for a better future for the rest of the world too. What is going on in Burma needs much more improvement. Please make sure there will be an elected government in the near future or better, re-instate the one that was ousted by the military regime. Thank you and may Buddha guide your steps while in Burma.

Marc B.
|
Thailand
November 30, 2011

Marc B. in Thailand writes:

Burma's government must release all political prisoners and end the targeted violence against ethnic groups before it is recognized by the US.

Nancy S.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Nancy S. in the U.K. writes:

I write to urge you to take a strong line with the Burmese in your meeting. Please do all in your power to stop them oppressing the people of Burma.
Please press for the release of all the political prisoners and true electoral reform. The people of Burma need people like you to stand up for them. When bullies oppress so badly, those of us fortunate enough to live elsewhere need to act otherwise we simply condone their action.
I’m sure you don’t condone it, so please use the power you have.

Marvin C.
|
Philippines
November 30, 2011

Marvin C. in the Philippines writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

Please make a strong stand when you visit Burma and recognize the efforts of Aung Sang Suu Kyi. If the United States is truly aiming for democracy and worldwide equality, condemn the heinous acts of the military regime in Burma. Thousands of Burmese are suffering everyday, while the people in the military loot the nation. Please consider our plea.

Marcus
|
Austria
November 30, 2011

Marcus in Austria writes:

Dear Secretary of State Hillary Clinton,

please send a clear message to Burma, that they have to continue their recent path of reforms towards more democracy and to end suppression of ethnic minorities and political opposition.

This could be a great opportunity to show the people of the world how determined American leadership can have a truly positive impact on the world we all live on!

Best Regards from Austria,
Marcus

Bert B.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Bert B. in the U.K. writes:

Please continue your valuable international work for freedom and justice by maintaining the pressure on Burma to instigate real democratic reforms so its people can live free from the injustice and fear which has characterised the lives of those who have struggled for freedom.

Stephen B.
|
Ireland
November 30, 2011

Stephen B. in Ireland writes:

Dear Hilary,

while I applaud your campaign towards ensuring democracy in Burma, I would be grateful if you would press home the importance of ensuring the existing regime releases all political prisoners and ends their targeted violence against ethnic groups.

Thank you also for your assistance in bringing about the Peace Process in (Northern) Ireland. You are a good woman.

When you are next in Belfast drop by for a cuppa and a chat!

peace,
Stephen
Ireland

alice j.
|
Spain
November 30, 2011

Alice J. in Spain writes:

Please do not just praise the Burmese Generals for their initial changes. Make a clear statement that policy will not change unless all political prisoners are free, atrocities to the ethnic groups stop and the constitution is amended.

Only sustained pressure will push real reform and liberate the people of Burma from violence and repression.

Daniel L.
|
Missouri, USA
November 30, 2011

Daniel L. in Missouri writes:

Please be tough on Burma during the upcoming visit. They need to be reminded of how far they have to go, not simply praised for making basic steps!

Lysbeth M.
|
Thailand
November 30, 2011

Lysbeth M. in Thailand writes:

please keep pressure up to support Aung Suu Kyi's requirements for reform before any concessions are made.

Cristina M.
|
United States
November 30, 2011

Cristina M. in the U.S. writes:

Min Ko Naing, U Gambira, Daw Su Su Nway are all still behind bars -- despite being some of the most promising leaders who can bring Burma into genuine democracy and peace. The first step to reform is for Thein Sein to free them (finally and unconditionally), then end hostilities against ethnic minorities and reform the flawed 2008 constitution.

I have signed a petition on Change.org, along with 44,000 other people, to support Burmese exile monk U Pyinya Zawta's request along these same lines.

Marilyn N.
|
Australia
November 30, 2011

Marilyn N. in Australia writes:

Please use your time in Burma to advocate for real reform and the immediate release of all political prisoners and detainees.

Ray S.
|
California, USA
November 30, 2011

Ray S. in California writes:

US policy should alway strongly back up democratic movements worldwide.

Chris G.
|
South Africa
November 30, 2011

Chris G. in South Africa writes:

All right thinking human beings join in heart and mind as you pursue a cause in the pursuit of justice, the most precious of all commodities.

Andrew B.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Andrew B. in the U.K. writes:

Please use your influence to push for genuine political reform in Burma.

Christine L.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Christine L. in the U.K writes:

Secretary Clinton,

Please demand real reform in Burma, to achieve democracy, peace and a positive future. In particular, please push for the immediate release of all political prisoners. Please do all you can to fully support the amazing efforts of Aung Sang Suu Kyi.

Wax G.
|
Germany
November 30, 2011

Gerhard W. in Germany writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton, you have the unique opportunity to support the Burmese people in reclaiming their country. I urge you not to accept the initial changes made the regime as being sufficient.
With best wishes for a effective journey
Gerhard

John S.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

John S. in the U.K. writes:

Please be firm with the Burmese leaders so that the people can have a better life.

Maureen M.
|
New Jersey, USA
November 30, 2011

Maureen M. in New Jersey writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

I urge to continue to take action on your belief in equality and democracy by supporting Aung Sang Suu Kyi and her party and releasing all political prisoners. Please do what you can to make a substantive difference in lives of the people of Burma.

Sarah D.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Sarah D. in the United Kingdom writes:

Please demand real reform in Burma, to achieve democracy, peace and a positive future. In particular, please push for the immediate release of all political prisoners. Please do all you can to fully support the amazing efforts of Aung Sang Suu Kyi.

Grayden
|
Canada
November 30, 2011

Grayden in Canada writes:

Burma's negligible, if slightly promising, steps are not nearly good enough. Don't congratulate them for simply being less appalling than before. Keep up the pressure, and make sure they know it is still not nearly good enough!

Miriam E.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Miriam E. in the United Kingdom writes:

I understand that in 24 hours, Hilary Clinton will visit Burma. This is wonderful! Her message could finally force this brutal regime to make major democratic reforms.

I am aware that the Burmese regime wants the US to recognise them and lift sanctions now. But Nobel Laureate, Aung Sang Suu Kyi says the regime must release all political prisoners and end the targeted violence against ethnic groups.

It is really important that sanctions are not lifted until real reforms are made. As I am sure Hilary Clinton is aware, if she simply applauds initial changes the country could be thrown back into crisis.

I therefore write to support the strategies suggested by Aung Sang Suu Kyi, who more than anyone else, understands the problems of Burma, and the route to real change for the better.

My wishes go with Hilary Clinton on this visit. This is a big opportunity in Burma for a move towards democracy.

Zharkov
|
United States
November 30, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Some readers may be confused about why you call Myanmar, "Burma".

The ruling military junta changed its name from Burma to Myanmar in 1989, a year after thousands were killed in the suppression of a popular uprising. Rangoon also became Yangon.

The change was recognised by the United Nations, and by countries such as France and Japan, but not by the United States and the UK.

A statement by the UK Foreign Office says: "Burma's democracy movement prefers the form 'Burma' because they do not accept the legitimacy of the unelected military regime to change the official name of the country. Internationally, both names are recognised."

So does the choice of Burma or Myanmar indicate a particular political position?

Mark Farmener, of Burma Campaign UK, says: "Often you can tell where someone's sympathies lie if they use Burma or Myanmar. Myanmar is a kind of indicator of countries that are soft on the regime.

If Burmese people are writing for publication, they use 'Myanmar', but speaking they use 'Burma'

Richard Coates, a linguist at the University of Western England, says adopting the traditional, formal name is an attempt by the junta to break from the colonial past.

The UN uses Myanmar, presumably deferring to the idea that its members can call themselves what they wish.

Local opposition groups do not accept that, and presumably prefer to use the 'old' colloquial name, at least until they have a government with popular legitimacy.
Governments that agree with this stance still call the country Burma.

The UN uses Myanmar, presumably deferring to the idea that its members can call themselves what they wish, provided the decision is recorded in UN proceedings. There are hosts of papers detailing such changes. The EU uses Burma/Myanmar.

A better question is, why is a military oligarchy allowed to remain a UN member?

Are there no standards of decency for entry into the UN?

Leif R.
|
Sweden
November 30, 2011

Leif R. in Sweden writes:

Dear Hillary!

Please keep pressure on Burmese military regime.

They must free all political prisoner, allow free press and free opinions to be heard.

They have to get the country back to the people.

As an US representative you have a great opportunity to raise US reputation among all of us that have doubt about your countrys behaviour.

With hope for a free world populated by a free mankind.

Cinserely
Leif R.

Jos F.
|
United Kingdom
November 30, 2011

Jos F. in the U.K writes:

Dear Mrs Clinton , please take a lead from the other states who do not recognise this junta .

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