U.S. Congratulates People of Libya on Historic Declaration of Liberation

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
October 23, 2011
Libyans Celebrate Declaration of Liberation

Following today's historic declaration of liberation in Libya, President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton released statements congratulating the people of Libya. President Obama said:

"On behalf of the American people, I congratulate the people of Libya on today's historic declaration of liberation. After four decades of brutal dictatorship and eight months of deadly conflict, the Libyan people can now celebrate their freedom and the beginning of a new era of promise.

"Now that the fighting in Libya has reached an end, the Transitional National Council (TNC) must turn its attention to the political transition ahead. We look forward to working with the TNC and an empowered transitional government as they prepare for the country's first free and fair elections. The Libyan authorities should also continue living up to their commitments to respect human rights, begin a national reconciliation process, secure weapons and dangerous materials, and bring together armed groups under a unified civilian leadership. As they take these steps, the United States will continue our close cooperation with our international partners and the UN Support Mission in Libya to help advance a stable, democratic transition."

In her statement, Secretary Clinton said:

"The United States joins the Libyan people as they celebrate liberation from more than four decades of Qadhafi's brutal dictatorship. The Libyan revolution was the work of ordinary, brave Libyans who demanded their freedoms and dignity. The United States is proud to have supported them in those efforts and we are committed to their future.

"This is a historic moment, but much work remains to be done. The process of forming a new representative government that is accountable to its people must reflect the same spirit of the revolution and the Transitional National Council should work to announce this government as soon as possible. The transitional authorities can build on this movement by promoting reconciliation and respect for human rights across Libyan society, while helping to prevent reprisals and ensuring the justice and due process that the Libyan people expect and deserve.

"The path to democracy is a long-term process that requires the participation of all Libyans. Just as the Libyan people led the revolution, they will also lead the process of transition and government formation. The United States remains deeply committed to the Libyan people who can now look forward to a new era of freedom, dignity, and security."

Comments

Comments

Ljiljana T.
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Serbia
October 23, 2011

Ljiljana T. in Serbia writes:

Not very convincing story about freedom and democracy. Bitter taste is the idea of ​​lynching people such methods as the most recent form of struggle for human rights and freedom, even worse is a way to judge someone's life and death. Bitter knowledge that the politicians in the media today, judge someone's guilt without a trial and verdict. Probably the courts and the rule of law is revoked in developed countries, but we, underdeveloped people, still not informed

Saurabh
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India
October 24, 2011

Saurabh in India writes:

So when is US going to help Tibetans or Palestinians? No guts or is it simply that there is no oil there??

Zharkov
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United States
October 24, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Add Libya, Egypt, and Iraq to the list of disasters which this administration has created for the Middle East as the rebels announce Libya will be an Islamic state governed by sharia law. So you've done it again -- Libya is one more country where people of other religions can expect to be murdered.

Tibet and Palestine are better off without U.S. assistance. Things only get worse under the Soros "Reponsibility to Protect" doctrine.

Zharkov
|
United States
October 24, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

If the Soros doctrine of "Responsibility to Protect" was even remotely valid, the U.S. would apply the "Responsibility to Protect" doctrine to civilians in Mexico, where almost 40,000 Mexican civilians and public officials have been murdered by the drug cartels in the past 3 years.

Narco-terrorists kill journalists, police chiefs, bloggers, innocent bystanders, even people at random just a few miles away from Senator McCain's and Governor Perry's home states.

So when will NATO begin bombing the drug cartel bosses in Mexico?

Why does the State Department avoid criticizing the genocide next door?

Shouldn't Mexican officials be on the no-fly list for allowing narco-terrorists to cross the border into America?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
October 24, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Well it would never serve to allow folks to party all by themselves,...when a toast to their noble efforts is appropriate;...and the fact that boys will be boys in the heat of battle not withstanding;...it's no reason to rain on their parade or doubt their commitment to justice,...even if immediate and graphic.

I mean some folks just don't get it about the "hidy-hole" thing..., and still insist on being dragged out of them. Only to be rudely awakened to the fact that they ain't as loved by the people as these dictator's often blindly assume.

I think those beating their moral platitudes to death over the form justice took forget that istant karma is served up cold and without delay to those who've had no empathy for others over a lifetime of achievement torturing those who begged him for mercy; and that if the finality put on this sad chapter of Libyan history is not to their liking and offends their delicate sensibilities of civilized behavior,...I hope they remember that the alternative these folks were asking for was to subject the Libyan people to more of Ghaddfi's insane ranting for the next year or two in a court, only to be executed upon conviction with 99.99% probability that folks would be delayed in having closure; spending a lot of time and money obtaining the same utimate justice that was meeted out,...whether in "crossfire" or no, and that his ultimate demise was not a long drawn out affair in the end...and that was most merciful;l of all. I mean hell could have been his every day for months on end,... for he could have been kept alive long enough to let everyone in Libya take turns and beat him with their shoes..., until every bone in his body was broken..., so in the end everybody got what they wanted I think, and Ghaddafi also got what he wanted..., to die in Libya.

It was a little too late for second thoughts when he said, "Don't shoot!".

And that too would be in keeping with instant karma's true nature.

Forest Gump was right.

EJ

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