Assistant Secretary Brownfield Leads High-Level U.S. Delegation to Pakistan

Posted by Courtney Beale
July 6, 2011

Ambassador William R. Brownfield, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for International Law Enforcement and Narcotics Affairs, arrived in Pakistan on Sunday, July 3 to lead the American delegation to meetings of the U.S.-Pakistan Strategic Dialogue Law Enforcement and Counterterrorism Working Group.

On Monday, July 4, Ambassador Brownfield laid a wreath in tribute at the Pakistan National Police Martyrs' Memorial and delivered the following remarks:

“Inspector General, senior officers, officers and men of the Islamabad Police and all representatives of Pakistan's law enforcement, I thank you very much for the honor of joining you today, particularly this day, the 235the anniversary of the independence of the country I represent, the United States of America. You do me high honor in allowing me to share it with you.

"Inspector General, since the dawn of history, all societies, peoples and countries have had two professions of arms: one to protect our communities from the threats from outside and the second to protect our communities from the threats from inside. And while I, the grandson, son and brother of Army officers have enormous respect for the military, it is now and always has been the police that protect our communities day after day. They patrol our streets and protect our homes, they rescue our children and confront the criminals, they solve crimes, and they bring justice to our communities. Whether it's Islamabad or Washington, Lahore or New York, Karachi or Los Angeles, they are the bedrock of our communities.

"Ladies and gentlemen, from time to time, far too often, they pay the ultimate price, they make the ultimate sacrifice. Inspector General, about one month ago, specifically on the seventh of June, I participated in an annual ceremony at the U.S. Law Enforcement Memorial in the city of Washington, where all American police, federal, state and local police met to honor those who fell that year. We added nearly 40 names to the memorial. We are here today at Pakistan's memorial where 500 names are already inscribed and 1,400 more will soon be inscribed. We say about each of those names that when others fled, they stood; when others cowered, they protected their communities; while others lived in cowardice, they died in honor. To them, to their families, I offer thanks, I offer respect, and I offer the highest honors.

"If I might close on this 4th of July, quoting the words of the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, who said in Gettysburg in 1863, 'The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.' Members of the Pakistani Law Enforcement Community, I thank you, I honor you and I respect you. Thank you very much."

On Tuesday, July 5, the United States and Pakistan released the following joint statement:

"The fourth Ministerial Level Pakistan-U.S. Strategic Dialogue on Law Enforcement and Counterterrorism was held in Islamabad on July 5, 2011. The two sides were led by Pakistan's Minister of Interior Senator A. Rehman Malik and William Brownfield, United States Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement of the Department of State.

"The meeting reaffirmed the commitment of both governments to continue the important work of the Pakistan-U.S. Strategic Dialogue and to strengthen both governments' cooperation on law enforcement and counterterrorism issues.

"Interior Minister Senator Rehman Malik and Assistant Secretary Brownfield discussed the tragic impact of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) on both law enforcement personnel and civilians in Pakistan, and across the border in Afghanistan. The death of over 500 Pakistani civilians from IEDs since the beginning of the calendar year 2011 called for the need for urgent action to combat the threat. Noting that suicide bombings and IED attacks have become an unacceptable and too frequent occurrence in Pakistan, both governments pledged to improve cooperation on stopping these vicious cowardly attacks by the enemies of humanity.

"The United States appreciated the enduring commitment and support of Pakistan to fight extremists and recognized the extreme sacrifice of Pakistan's law enforcement and military personnel. Assistant Secretary Brownfield paid tribute to the fallen police officers by laying a wreath at the Police Martyrs Memorial which recognizes the 1,400 law enforcement officers who laid down their lives in the fight against terrorism.

"The delegations also exchanged ideas on how to improve the prosecution for illegal shipments of IED precursors and terrorism cases, including strengthening the legislative framework for such cases. The two parties also discussed the challenges and progress made in Pakistan's efforts to counter the illicit trafficking of drugs.

"The United States agreed to assist Pakistan to ensure that Pakistan's law enforcement officers are adequately equipped to combat the threat posed by terrorists and ensure the protection of the people of Pakistan.

"The two sides agreed to continue these discussions and further enhance cooperation in field of counterterrorism."

Comments

Comments

donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
July 7, 2011

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

I think that Governments dictate what happens and when a country like Pakistan has been an ally of the United States, makes you wonder with all the terrorism that has happened in the past ten years what they are truly doing. Our forces in Afghanistan have always been under attack by the Taliban, which was trained in Pakistan. Yet its our Nation that has continued to keep them on the payroll. I think its time for the country of Pakistan to stand on its own two feet. Provide for its own security. I don't dislike all Pakistan people, just the ones that train the taliban who attack our people. Who destroy innocent lives. The ones that train in the Taliban and continue to cause destruction. When the Government of Pakistan needs to start a program for "MENTAL HEALTH" once a month all Pakistan citizens should receive this kind of training. The kind of training that makes them want to live, raise a family, and not take up arms to destroy human lives. It would be a blessing if Mental Health Counselors can be sent to Pakistan to help deal with the Mental Issues of the people. This would help end the existing conflicts. Once they realize mentally its wrong to kill, then maybe theres hope that they will start raising families, and not recruiting for the Taliban.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 7, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Donald in Virginia,

Aha! I see you have finally grasped the notion of "the sane vs. the insane" I've often descibed the nature of the struggle we're a part of.

So I thought you'd appreciate what this corageous young lady has to say on the matter.

"http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/video/world/2011/07/06/cotd.shehrbano.tasee..."

I said the other day to John in Canada that the fabric of society is as tough as kevlar, but it is individuals like this that make it so; as an enduring proposition worthy of our nation's support.

We be mearly observers, she's in the thick of it.

I figured her's was a valuable perspective to bring to the kitchen table of our little State sponsored public think tank called Dipnote.

In fact, if Courtney Beale has a way to contact Ms. Taseer, I'd like to invite her to join us on the blog and go in-depth on these issues with us.

I think she'll get as much insight out of the discussion as we will.

Best,

EJ

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 7, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Mmmm, I wonder just how much we should bill Pakistan for when 'lil Kim starts a nuclear war, bein' that all the Yuan in China won't cover the bill we send Mr. Hu for China's decades of support to North Korea.

That's if we'll accept payment from Pakistan instead of just hauling off and going for a glow in the dark solution to their nuclear arsenal about 5 minutes after it starts.

That would be what I think people call reciprocity, with interest added.

Karma isn't something folks want to mess with....it can become the tar baby you get stuck with forever.

Especially where it concerns nuclear proliferation.

http://t.co/suiyoS5

related article from Wash. Post;

http://t.co/ec1tgwE

donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
July 7, 2011

Donald in Virginia writes:

@eric in New Mexico

Hey Eric, we can find something we agree on...(chuckle chuckle) the 20 billion dollars spent on Pakistan in my opinion should of included Mental Health People Experts to heal those those dysfunctional people who just want to destroy human life. I am sure they could find many cases of Mental health issues if they start looking in Pakistan. If the people can get this kind of training and it just might put an end to suicide attacks. We as Americans our foresight is to live, raise a family, good family values. It will take more than putting people in school to turn around a country like Pakistan. They need lots of Mental Health training. Then the suicide attacks should end.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 7, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Donald,

Personally I applaud your initiative, but I gotta say that in all practical application the only mental health program I could foresee working on terrorists is to pl;ant them like trees and let their insanity dissipate of its own accord as they become fertilizer.

( which I must point out to the Sec. of State leads me to fully disagree with her on one or two very important points;

When she speaks for this government insisting there's "no military solution" and "we can't kill all the terrorists in the world";

I beg to differ, because no political solution that leads to lasting peace has ever been arrived at before utter, total, unconditional surrender of our enemies has been achieved.

And don't tell me we can't kill all the terrorists in this world when for decades on now we've had the unilateral capability of extermination the entire human race.

Rather she probably should have qualified that statement by saying, "It's not our desire to have to kill all the terrorists of the world, so long as folks are willing to take care of their own."

Makes more sense to me as a policy that way.

Best,

EJ

donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
July 7, 2011

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

Terrorism is a virus that won't go away!

The best way to deal with the problems, is find solutions. If Doctors can provide mental health to patients in Pakistan, review and provide possible medication even, what ever it takes to get them medically treated. The bottom line is will never ever get out of this situation until the people of Pakistan recieve some type of Mental Health evaluations, and treated for Mental Health problems.

Its great if you can remove all the terrorist of the world, but the problem is you never do. You destroy one and ten of thousands start up. I say focus on the real problem they have, after all our Government gives them free money, why not some Mental Health service that might make them want to live and NOT destroy innocent lives. The State Department can suggest to the Pakistan Goverment to get people enrolled and evaluated plus treat the Mental Health cases in Pakistan. Then maybe in future the Taliban will not be able to change the peoples minds. Treat the root of the problem. Then the healing process happens. Seems to me that after all the billions of dollars spent on the wars, on drone attacks, wouldn't it be wiser to remove the threat completely by treating the problems?

John
|
Canada
July 7, 2011

John in Canada writes:

Mental health workers would be entering very dangerous territory – we would pit science against religious belief – not very wise and probably would exasperate the situation.

I happen to agree with Secretary Clinton that the military option will never be totally successful unless you propose total genocide.

I don’t agree with suicide bombings to be clear – The problem in my view is a belief system that has been fueled long before 9/11.

Certain countries (I won’t name –this would not be posted otherwise) have invested considerable money in promoting a belief system in parts of the world. This belief system is dangerous for Muslims and non Muslims alike.

When countries allow for certain schools to promote such beliefs and those attending have nothing to counter what they are being told - -it’s not too hard then to see how people are mislead into a way of thinking – that thinking becomes action in a very nasty way.

There are Muslims that are considered heretics in places like Pakistan and Saudi Arabia –their lives are in just as much danger ; Just as much as any American.

The problem always is with fundamentalists – or better yet the preachers of fundamentalism – they spread the cancer – until we counter successfully the ideology, making the fundamentalist belief irrelevant – we will forever have problems. (Fundamentalists of all types screw things up for the rest of us every time and they ARE a minority – (they are not all Muslim to be fare)

One way of combating this is already being done but it needs ramping up in a big way – it will be more effective than armies or traditional politics if successful.

"http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entry/advancing_religious_freedom_..."

Suzan Johnson Cook - good luck, your job is likely more important than most could appreciate.

On a lighter note I was thinking today of the lowly pigeon. I pigeon has a phenomenal memory for navigational way points. Up to 1000 in fact. I was then thinking of a chess player. Could a pigeon with this memory be taught to beat a human at chess? After all chess is not much more than preprogrammed moves and the ability to think several moves ahead , essentially this defines chess genius. If the pigeon could be successfully taught to apply its navigational sense to a chess board using a reward system, would we consider the pigeon to be genius? (laugh).

donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
July 7, 2011

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@ John in Canada

True it is very dangerous thats why it should be up to the Pakistan Government to put in place a system that aid those people who want to committ suicide. I think we overlooked the biggest detail in this whole terrorism problem, getting to the root of the problem. If countries or Governments do not address the root, will always continue to have terrorism. Hence its about the message they are preaching in schools in the Middle East. We as a Nation and including Canada spends upwards of Billions if not Trillions on National Security, beefing up airports etc... but my view is our Government leaders need to promote a system that works to prevent future terrorism. Then maybe we all would have a safer place in the world to live.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 8, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Terrorists are free to lay down their weapons and walk the road to peace, but like any treatment suggested it's got to be their choice unless you're going to put them in straitjacket, pump 'em up with thorozine, and be acused of torture when administering shock treatment to pacify their minds, or performing frontal lobatomies.

But for the rest of Pakistanis, a great number of them suffering from PTSD due to circumstance they are tryin' to get a handle on...well I'm not a doctor and thus not qualified to provide a perscription for that; save to say a decade of peace would probably help.

Now it may be that in planting tens of thousands of trees for a few years before reintegrating with society, a terrorist who would walk another path might find meaning in life, and an appreciation for it as he'll have a forest to show his kids as being something of his worth to the world;

But failing that, we have other options we can put on the table.

When is a terrorist not a terrorist?

When he walks the path to peace.

When I say we absolutely can kill all the terrorists in the world, I never suggested a monocromatic methodology of achieving that. Nor a genocidal one.

But to achieve their own realization to do so requires a military solution that compells them to lay down arms.

All civilian efforts proscribed by policy to improve peoples lot in life can hope to achive is a vaccine against terror over the long term.

Just as the Secretary's promotion of empowerment of women is sound strategic thinking to that same end.

But how folks expect to achieve that without a military solution to render harmless all the violent males in a society that choose terrorism as a way of expressing their ingnorance of living well, is frankly not going to lead a nation to peace if you deny there is one.

We are involved in a civil war, waged upon civil societies, in an uncivilized manner.

One that goes far beyond the boundaries of nations or ethnicity, for terrorists seek control of a religious ideology in scizm with reality.

Or any path to peace and prosperity any true Muslim might ascribe to, for that matter.

That the civil war is among Muslims...well, I think both Shiite and Suni would agree, the over-spillage from that "endless war" has caused us to go to war with such extremism.

And we may just bill folks for that eventually if the don't get their act together...and lest we take our "eyes off the ball" in all context with what Iran is up to in the region, they're going to get the biggest bill of all for their decades of sponsoring terror.

I don't pretend I can change the minds of anyone reading this any more than I would the average bin laden wannabe, but thanks to Dipnote I may just be able to compel folks to think of their own free inspiration that it's a chicken and the egg thing in which compells us to roast these turkeys.

Attitude is everything in the victory over insanity;

"We are here today at Pakistan's memorial where 500 names are already inscribed and 1,400 more will soon be inscribed. We say about each of those names that when others fled, they stood; when others cowered, they protected their communities; while others lived in cowardice, they died in honor. To them, to their families, I offer thanks, I offer respect, and I offer the highest honors."

That was well put forward I think by Mr. Brownfield, very concise and to the point. There ain't no cutting and running from this fight when the karma of that will just follow folks home.

If we and our partners don't have the political will to do this conventionally...and done right this time...the likelyhood of having to nuke a sponsor of terror or terrorist safe haven becomes exponentially greater when we have to go back again and finaly resolve their critical malfunction of understanding.

I'm saying what I'm saying now in order to prevent that nightmare.

Which is of course that 500 lb gorrilla sitting in the corner of the room no one is officially willing to acknowlege or talk about, but don't ever think he's my imaginary friend, I don't deal in illusions and my government can't afford to have any.

Thanks for your consideration.

EJ

John
|
Canada
July 8, 2011

John in Canada writes:

@Donald in Virginia

Love Virginia by the way –(my kids love the 7/11 and Dunken Dougnuts everywhere) -

complete agreement with you– it’s too bad the Pakistanis have nukes – never has sat right with me.

palgye
|
South Korea
July 8, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Not the other way around, South Korea and the internal problems of their country, which completely torn apart, rulers and large corporations - like the situation. , So that the people in the direction they want and believe it's easier to remote control, thrust in front of the media blowing the trumpet I think. Hired pretty girls - but, in Korea, its pretty anchors include their social conditions of success, sex should be provided with the essential story in an informal place, I think talking to people who are associated. Love sex in exchange for success, not to provide the rulers think that there is prostitution market. That is the reality of Korea.

It's just too good to be the media, I think he would not believe, however, the situation in North Korea even more pessimistic'm a ...

Young girls sports for her career, large corporation`s ceo and politicians, invested in real estate where the publicity, and
Then they tricked into view, his tax return for large corporations and politicians has forced a situation in which the dedication.
Less true of the open society, rulers of what makes the issue of indulgences, to help you, the people think of as a celebrity or sports hero, would explain a lot.
Replaced the governor of California, understanding that the situation improved, the movie star's just a movie star.

To pay normal taxes odds of Korea - South Korea to pay normal taxes on the most people living salary she demanded, that usually I'm an idiot, I think. Politicians and ceo of enterprise, such as lawyers, tax, rather than doctors, tax heaven to think I liked more.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 8, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Courtney Beale,

Here's a bit of analysis I offered folks a long time ago in a letter to my government in early 2002;

As such I post this now for the reader's comparitive analysis with an article published recently.

This was written when the attack on the Indian Parliment was front page news;

"As for Pakistan and India, rather than just asking them to get it together, and stand down, there may be the need for the U.S. to consider other options, to prevent the Asian subcontinent from becoming uninhabitable.
In my opinion, nuclear war is the ultimate terrorist act.

If these two nations cannot see the way to peace, then we just have to convince them, if need be, to prevent the loss of life and ecosystem, that cannot be replaced.

If that worst case scenario occurs, the results of nuclear war having been studied, I don't need to remind anyone of the possible irreversible environmental damage, loss of life, etc. Just add to that a few Chernobyls on top, in the case of this war, considering the nuclear power plants in the area.

If they choose war, we must I believe, if we have the time and capacity to stop it, act in a considered and concrete way to prevent holocaust.

In the fact that the timing of this situation stinks, I have to wonder if it smells of Al-Quaida, the resulting evidence of the groups responsible for the attacks in India, and their known support by both Pakistan and the Taliban suggests to me a connection. Done to help bin Ladin escape? Pakistan helps the U.S., Pakistan is targeted, via India.

Despite the reliance on prophesy and questionable psychic resources, bin Ladin's not to be underestimated, he knows how to play a situation for all it's worth, I think it's evident to most Afghans at this point, that as a "guest" he broke every rule, including wrecking the host's dwelling.

He may believe that widening the conflict will serve his ends, in the short term at least, I think it has.

Until the Pak intelligence service is totally purged of all individuals supporting terrorism, we still will have serious problems down the road as well.

India's not much better in some regards, if they have acted so wisely in Kashmir, why the conflict? M. Gandhi taught them nothing?

There's only one thing they can do with Kashmir to end this once and for all, that's to turn it into a "co-national park" with internationally (interim) monitored local rule.

They either learn to share, or lose it forever, as the case may be if war happens.

I hope that if the situation is not resolved by dialog, they'll end up thanking the U.S. in the long run, for stepping in to stop it. By whatever conventional military and diplomatic means available."

EJ-10 Jan 2002

--end excerpt--

"That was nothing compared to what has already been planned for India in the future," Kashmiri replied.

In his book "Inside al Qaeda and the Taliban: Beyond bin Laden and 9/11" - published days after his death - Shahzad said Kashmiri was behind the Mumbai attack. He wrote that Kashmiri's plan was to provoke India to attack Pakistan, instantly ending any Pakistani operations against al Qaeda and other militant groups.

--end excerpt--

Source: "http://security.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/08/u-s-99-sure-top-terrorist-was-k..."

---

Once upon a time I had a rather interesting telephone conversation with a fellow well known to all who blog here, who wondered whether I had "an inside source" ..."No", I replied somewhat suprized by the question, but I forgot to mention gut instict if I recall that conversation correctly.

I'm not one to speculate what intuition may be worth to folks, but I've asked folks in this gov. to review everything I've ever written on this blog for a reason, even if it seems I've gone out on a speculative limb in some cases, (never mind some entertaining fictional tales told with humor regarding "prince and paupers" or "UBL's search for the meaning of life"), and virtually sawed the branch off behind me...(chuckle) intellectually.
And not because of my ego, or notoriety, or forb some personal gain in mind, or even a non-profit book deal (chuckle) do I make such request.

But to find good cause in your own analysis of it all, to heed the gut instinct I've offered to folks previously on these pages.

One may come to wonder whether my muse be psycic, but I can assure this Dept of State I am not to the best of my knowledge.

All this has been a lot of hard work actually, with thousands of hours over the years put into it.

Being an "informed citizen" won't explain everything though.

And so you'll have to be the judge of what gut instict may be worth, or has been worth to the dept. or any other branch of government.

It is what it is, and I hope you'all make good use of it.

Time is what allows the proof in the pudding to set.

Best regards,

EJ

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