Progress in Libya

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 29, 2011

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered remarks following the International Conference on the Libyan Crisis in London on March 29, 2011. Secretary Clinton highlighted her discussions with counterparts on a broad variety of issues, including the ongoing coalition military action in support of Resolution 1973, the transition as NATO takes over as the leader of the coalition mission, and the situation in Syria. Secretary Clinton said:

"I began the day with a meeting with Dr. Jibril and two other representatives of the Libyan Transitional National Council to hear their perspective on the situation in Libya. We talked about our efforts to protect civilians and to meet humanitarian needs and about the ongoing coalition military action in support of Resolution 1973. We also discussed the need for a political solution and transition in Libya, and I reiterated the support of the United States on behalf of President Obama for the legitimate aspirations of the Libyan people, and our commitment to helping them achieve those aspirations.

"I also had the opportunity to meet with both Prime Minister Cameron and with Foreign Minister Hague. I expressed the United States' gratitude for the critical leadership that the United Kingdom has shown in building an effective international response to the crisis in Libya. We consulted on the way forward, the military, political, and humanitarian dimensions. And we also discussed events and broader trends across the Middle East and North Africa and our joint efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

"I had the opportunity also to consult with a number of other counterparts about Libya because today's conference is taking place at a moment of transition, as NATO takes over as leader of the coalition mission, a mission in which the United States will continue to play an active, supporting role. Some of our coalition partners announced additional support and contributions today, which we welcomed.

"In addition to our joint military efforts, we discussed the need for progress in Libya along the three nonmilitary tracks: First, delivering humanitarian assistance; second, pressuring and isolating the Qadhafi regime through robust sanctions and other measures; and third, supporting efforts by Libyans to achieve the political changes that they are seeking.

"We also agreed on a structure for decision making going forward on both the military and political tracks. On the military side, we agreed that the North Atlantic Council with coalition partners fully at the table will be the sole provider of executive direction for NATO operations, similar to the ISAF approach for Afghanistan. On the political side, we agreed to establish a contact group to offer a systematic coordination mechanism and broad political guidance on the full range of efforts under Resolutions 1970 and 1973. And as I'm sure you just heard from the prime minister of Qatar, Qatar has agreed to host the first meeting of the contact group, along with the UK.

"In a series of side meetings, I also had the chance to discuss a number of issues, including Syria. I expressed our strong condemnation of the Syrian Government's brutal repression of demonstrators, in particular the violence and killing of civilians in the hands of security forces. I also discussed efforts that are undertaken by the Organization of the Islamic Conference, particularly our joint effort to pass a resolution at the Human Rights Council that promotes tolerance and respect as well as free expression. And we greatly appreciate the OIC hosting a meeting of the International Contact Group on Afghanistan and Pakistan in Jeddah. I was also able to consult on a number of regional matters, including, of course, Libya with Foreign Minister Davutoglu of Turkey.

"So it was a full day for all of us. We came to London to speak with one voice in support of a transition that leads to a brighter future for the Libyan people. I'm very pleased with the progress that we have made both today and in the days preceding it, and grateful for everyone who participated in the conference and in the broader effort in Libya. I think we are making a lot of progress together, and we could not do it unless we were representing the international community as we are."

You can read the Secretary's complete remarks here.

Comments

Comments

Sam S.
|
Liberia
March 29, 2011

Sam S. in Liberia writes:

Sec.Clinton. Thanks for good job in Libya. What is been done for the people in the Ivory Coast?

Madam.Sec. we hope your have not forget about the criminal in Abidjan who has refused to leave office. My country have almost 200,000 refugees. Please for God do something to help the sub-region.

Laura
|
Maryland, USA
March 30, 2011

Laura in Maryland writes:

Looks like Hillary is taking charge. On another note, is humanitarian assistance in Libya considered a MOOTW?

DrG
|
West Virginia, USA
March 30, 2011

Dr. G. in West Virginia writes:

We need to use Ghaddafi's US frozen assets to pay for Libya's rescue

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 30, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Well Dr. G, It isn't our money, though I tend to agree with you that we've incurred expense as a result of the actions of ethical infants and they should pay for it.

But I think the Lybian people may need that money to rebuild in a post-Ghaddafi scenario.

However, it may be that whatever permanent government arises from the ashes will feel it is in Lybia's national interest to voluntarily write a check to us out of those frozen funds released to them, thanking us for going the distance for their shot at freedom, and so eliminating any percieved conspiracy theory that we've done this for a potential return on the back-end of the deal via oil leasing rights.

Generally though, the thanks of a freed people is enough of a payback as future good relations have solid ground to be based upon.

In theory, I'd be perfectly content to see my government rob dictators blind to pay for the wars they start with us. In this case the war was waged not on us, but on Ghaddafi's own people, so they have first dibs on compensation in my book.

EJ

Pam
|
West Virginia, USA
March 30, 2011

Pam in West Virginia writes:

We must continue to support Secretary Clinton in her never-ending perseverence to bring about peace.

John
|
Canada
March 30, 2011

John in Canada writes:

Go girl power!

Good work mam, but the job has only just begun. You have a long way to go. Stop looking at this in a compartmentalized fashion. Look broadly at the region. It’s time to rock this for all its worth – peace can be a dirty business, until you clean house.

palgye
|
South Korea
March 31, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Thank You ...

and
We do health Care refrom in U.S.
by
Mr President Barack Obama.
it`s needing for us not for one,
any other not propell to me,
just my thinking.

Libya

Libya's weapons to the militia and the food, water, medical supplies I think we should support. North Africa to develop democracy and capitalism, rather than a dictatorship, where people think their system is suitable. Both are already talking, but while watching the situation in Libya, to decide on their actions to think.

If they can not support a national, volunteer?, An association of veterans of the ability of the initial to the militia, hoping to help a lot I think. Libya is the problem, and only after considerable progress, a lot of attention in Japan, expect to be connected. Already, as determined under the circumstances I will After getting me to forget my plight, has not been determined, once again, to consider the appeal period.

Of course, support, or lack of militia in their efforts to goods that might be obtained from either inside or outside in anticipation, when trying to talk, erased ...

Germany is in the desert of North Africa by solar and renewable energy production, tried to transfer to Germany, I remember the news.

Back here, also get a small thing, everything, not losing, I think the possibility is robbery.

PS: It is private. My father died a few days, you've I do not care about home, struggling upright, I was worried, Hyundai Heavy Industries produce parts of the robot is working in-www.hhi.co.kr-my sister's husband came to many of my colleagues gave relieve anxiety. Aldermen also-www.gyeongju.go.kr-of Gyeongju It came to me, not my relatives asking for their thoughts is because of friendship.

And, Pohang--www.manseo.co.kr--(they are making factory in China, my uncle working in there, just working)and several companies of the small business ....

Funeral, tomorrow, the last event of the traditional oriental. Suddenly, the right thing, is frustrating. Where to start in what, I'm talking to here, prepared with care in the past, but my father's death is ..... What to do?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 31, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Palgye

Very sorry to hear about your personal loss Palgye, my deepest condolences to you and your family.

Be well my friend,

EJ

Sarah G.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 31, 2011

Sarah in Washington, DC writes:

I am pleased the United States is working with the international community to provide a brighter future for the Libyan people.

@ Palgye, I am sorry for your loss. I want you to know that I enjoy your reading your thoughts on DipNote, and I hope you will continue to share your clever insights. You are a valued member of the DipNote community.

palgye
|
South Korea
April 3, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

@Eric

@Sarah

Thank You, my grief is very lessen...

Thank You.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 3, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

A thought has been developing over the last couple weeks and from what I've seen I think in order to "protect populations" and be sure of aquiring the right target (as Ghaddafi forces are using civilian trucks armed as "technicals" to avoid NATO aircraft), it may be helpful.

Someone just compared this to a "football game" and I suppose they meant where the whole game was spent rushing and punting back and forth across the gridiron.

What if we strongly suggested the "digging in" of opposition forces where they're at, and told them to save their ammo rather than have aircraft mistake them for Ghaddafi's forces and ask them if it's ok for them to let the professionals do what needs to be done to protect them and the rest of the civilian population.

Not to dampen their spirits, but they pretty much a danger to themselves more than Ghaddafi's forces, given their lack of tactics.

We could say "Watch and learn." and make it an educational oppurtunity, rather than "shock and awe". This is beyond any attempt at shock therapy to get Ghaddafi to get off his backside and leave.

We got a ways to go before we can comfortably say we've eliminated Ghaddafi's capacity to make war on his people, and that's when he's no longer giving the orders.

We should be clear about one thing, that this cannot end in stalemate.

There are no winners, only losers if this drags on.

Folks talk of the strain on our armed forces, but make no mention of the fact that like all you FSO's out there on the front lines of diplomacy, we now have a cadre of veterans to call upon to meet any crisis, and America is the stronger for it.

Well we have other NATO members who are now establishing veteran forces in Afghanistan, but I doubt if most of their total men in uniform have ever fired at shot in conflict.

Unlike some, I'm ok with handing off the military command to NATO, it's high time they get a real-time evaluation of whether all their training pays off or not.

Looks like it has so far.

But can they deliver the peace and take "all neccessary measures" to protect populations by enforcing it?

I think there's a ways to go before we get there from here.

EJ

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