Situation in Libya

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 21, 2011
Benghazi, Libya

On February 20, 2011, Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs P.J. Crowley released the following statement on the situation in Libya:

"The United States is gravely concerned with disturbing reports and images coming out of Libya. We are working to ascertain the facts, but we have received multiple credible reports that hundreds of people have been killed and injured in several days of unrest -- and the full extent of the death toll is unknown due to the lack of access of international media and human rights organizations.

"We have raised to a number of Libyan officials, including Libyan Foreign Minister Musa Kusa, our strong objections to the use of lethal force against peaceful demonstrators. We reiterated to Libyan officials the importance of universal rights, including freedom of speech and peaceful assembly. Libyan officials have stated their commitment to protecting and safeguarding the right of peaceful protest. We call upon the Libyan government to uphold that commitment, and hold accountable any security officer who does not act in accordance with that commitment."

Comments

Comments

palgye
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South Korea
February 21, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Feedback is very cautious, but hard to Libya, but Iran is likely to think a little bit. If I am capable, I have to jeopgeunhaebo, in-depth conversations and approaches .....

Libya also wanted a lot of exchanges with the United States in the past, and now the river flows in the direction to go? But, still, rather than control, power is maintained properly to consider the country, Libya is considered necessary for the professional staff.

I'm sorry. Too common story, but with the right sponsors and a couple T / F I could have, would have continued access to ... So do you think that, but when I do something in Korea, but she keeps by laughing, lose motivation before.

Subject to the Iran and Libya have a spare tire ... Alone, no matter how hard I try I just lack a lot of trust on the Internet, so clean, and the action because everyone, I'm not filled with greed .... The burden of failure can not even approach it, rather than ...

I think the ideal model - wouId Iaugh at, in cooperation with businesses to create channels of dialogue, relieving the burden of opening the way for companies to give preference to small I think.

The risk of junk bonds, but if successful, is thought to be higher profits considerably.

is too short, life ...

M.k.A. A.
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Oman
February 21, 2011

Aloraimi in Oman writes:

I am in Oman and very shocked to see women, children and inocenste people are fired at from aircraft and heavy guns. I am sening my request to all world people to help stop this massicar, try to enforce no fly zone over, Liya till libyan people capture Gadafi and courmarchal him. Pleas apply no fly zone and shot flying gadafi air force...I ask American, european and middleastren people who has the power to do so..stop killing people in Libya. Please send this message to everyone whom you know.

Steven J.
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Oregon, USA
February 21, 2011

Steven J. in Oregon writes:

The US veto in the Security Council which prevented sanctioning of Israel's settlement policy is especially tragic in this time of risk and opportunity in the Arab world. We should reschedule a softer condemnation vote, but one with some real sanctions ASAP.

As despotic regimes are driven out of office the main alternatives will be fragmented tribal governments, new despots, fundamentalists or a genuine representative government. We have no "street cred" as a real friend of the people after the last 3 wars and obvious siding with Israel, which has unfortunately become a litmus test of support for Muslims.

I am not for throwing Israel to the wolves, but we have become codependent supporters of a string of right wing governments that just wants to postpone the issue, and creates facts on the ground by taking land. Sharon got to power by triggering a second round of Palestinian protests by visiting and threatening the Dome of the Rock Mosque. Both extremes know how to claim the headlines and make fears of the opposition the prominent topic in politics. We should not join the escalation of this feud, and need to push a realistic acceptance of coexistence.

Hamas became powerful because the Palestinian Authority was not able to deliver on any viable state. Hezbollah now dominates the Lebanese government from opposition to the last few Israeli invasions. People who witnessed grossly disproportional death and destruction will sympathize with attacks against their invaders and ignore the organization’s other practices. That was the hour that mattered for the Lebanese and we lost influence. How could the US have stood silent about Israeli bombing as far away as Beirut in a supposed border incursion? This and our silence about widespread civilian casualties in Gaza will be long remembered in the Middle East, as much as Abu Ghraib.

Regarding the settlements, unilateral claims of disputed land with longstanding Palestinian ownership in occupied land has no legal legitimacy. Land, water and human rights can not be divided preferentially based on American politics or power relations. When European democracies unanimously oppose the US on an issue, we should examine our national policies critically and realistically.

Even putting human rights aside, we have seen that high tech weapons are much less valuable than support of the population in guerilla wars. Our society will long be addicted to Middle East oil and we need to anticipate a realistic policy to appeal to people in the Middle East that see history in a different light. They have seen our government and industry support the regimes that opressed them, we need to show we value them as human beings of equal value. We had a chance to push the reset button and blew it. We should find a way to correct this mistake very quickly.

Joseph M.
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Oregon, USA
February 21, 2011

Joseph M. in Oregon writes:

Once again, once a autocratic, authoritarian ruler, initiates the random killing of their own people, my guess would be that they will not survive as a ruler and "yes, they've lost their grip and any future prospect for remaining in authority as a longstanding dictator". There are some key differences with respect to Libya; Libya is strategically important to the international community due to its high yielding oil production and unlike Tunisia and Egypt, the Libyan regime seeks in choosing violence and would rather kill their population, instead of adhering to stepping down. I heard Qaddafi's son, quote the following this morning, broadcasted by BBC World News, when asked if they are considering engaging with the demonstrators seeking reforms--suggesting that the Libyan government would seek further confrontation, by stating: "if it takes every last bullet, in reference to stopping the demonstrators, they literally would rather kill the Libyan people". So much for the concept of human rights, rule of law and seeking any hope for democratic reforms for change! An absolute mess. I'd like to see the EU place greater pressure, in asking the Libyan government in stepping down, they should be indicted by the International War Tribunal for "crimes against humanity".

Joseph M.
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Oregon, USA
February 21, 2011

Joseph M. in Oregon writes:

@ Steven J.,

I've been busy writing my graduate thesis, but I feel compelled in addressing the recent U.S. delegation's "veto" at the U.N. general assembly. I couldn't agree with you (Steven J.) more on the U.S. recent veto for not "condemning the continuation of settlements in Eastern Jerusalem". I am absolutely appalled by the U.S. vote and subsequent veto and with the fact that the U.S. seemingly, is not able to go along with the EU and the rest of the international community on condemning, Israeli's repeated efforts in ignoring the expansion of Israeli settlement in East Jerusalem. The Israeli's do not want a meaningful two-state solution and peace agreement with the Palestinians, this has been clear during the past decade by their actions.

The U.S. veto and vote sends the "wrong message to the international community", it is contradictory and is certainly counter-productive in enhancing any hope for a future, agreement between the two parties. I am disheartened by the U.S. veto and appalled by the notion that there seems to be a different standard when we engage the Israeli's, when we address their policies, and our lack of assuming a firmer stance with the Israeli's lack of cooperation in the region.

Eric
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New Mexico, USA
February 22, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Crater a few military runways and tell the Lybian airforce to go home and take care of their mothers?

There's an idea...get you a "no-fly" zone for about a month that way, easy. If there's anything left for them to fly after that, more precicely.

The question is will their mothers let them back in the house after bombing the people?

I think it's all but a moot point, Ghadaffi will likely endure the same fate as Mussolini at the hands of his people, for his crimes committed upon them.

And he'll have only himself to blame if he be hung on a meathook like a side of beef.

Maybe once a terrorist, always a terrorist?

Like serial killers I guess, sometimes they take a break for a few years and then go back at it.

Well I remember telling a fellow dipnote blogger awhile back that there was a lot of mental illness on the world stage.

I guess I don't need anyone to second that opinion as it's patently obvious that the criminally insane are doing their thing.

@ PJ Crowley, Assist Sec. of State- Public Affairs

How about we just put a screeching halt to it PJ? Talkin's not doing, and the other guy ain't listening, so let's all get busy as democracies on this planet and tap dance on Ghaddafi's head...might wake the boy up.

Or we could simply have him for batting practice at spring training this year courtesy of the entire RED SOX NATION.

I mean with all due respect for life, limb and property and all...words alone, I don't think will cut it when you need a scalple to perform the lobotomy.

See, this is a another real good example of why the world can no longer afford to put up with tyrants and dictators for another second.

And I would suggest to you without speculation sir, that "the war on terror" has actually entered a new universal understanding thereby.

Looks like the people are winning, but at a very high price.

EJ

sal
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Maryland, USA
February 21, 2011

Sal in Maryland writes:

Please act now to help the people of Libya. The people are being killed in the name of freedom. The US must rally with the UN and others to pressure the government to stop or face extreme measures. This is completely unacceptable.

Eric
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New Mexico, USA
February 22, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Aloraimi in Oman, Steven J. in Oregon, and Joseph M. in Oregon have inspired a "what if?" thought on how to resolve a few things.

Seems both Ghaddafi and the Israelis have public diplomacy problems, for different reasons, and now I think I've found a complimentary solution.

See, if the Isrealis cratered those military runways in Lybia to create a virtual no-fly zone and support freedom and democracy for Muslims in helping remove Ghaddafi, I bet that would send more shock waves through the Muslim population of the region than even all the unrest going on in it presently combined.

Like that would be the last thing folks would expect, right?

Right, so that's why the Israelis should probably go for it.

Somebody's got to.

Stands to put them in a whole different light on the Arab street. For once the Israeli gov. will have actually become liberators rather than retaining their rep. in the region as oppressors.

Plus they get to make Iran nervous while they get to earn kudo's among a lot of folks that don't trust them at present, so what's not to like about that if you're the leader of Israel?

A little shock and awe might just go a long way to establishing the trust needed for a restart of one on one talks as called for.

If an attitude adjustment is called for, then I think there's a way to make that happen.

I bet the Egyptian military would allow overflight of their territory if asked for the above purpose.

I suppose we could do it if no one else will, but the Israelis are closer.

Anatoliy
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Ukraine
February 22, 2011

Anatoliy in the Ukraine writes:

Every people have, in accordance with the preamble of Universal Declaration of human rights, right on rebelling against tyranny and oppression. And every leader must by it consider, otherwise he dooms itself on a contempt and court of own people. And will not envy to the that dictator, who ignores with opinion people . In Ukraine position differs nothing from position in the Arabic countries, but the Ukrainian people too patient, but will come and turn and for our people to rise in revolt from the superhuman terms of life. I believe in it.

chris b.
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Maryland, USA
February 22, 2011

Chris B. in Maryland writes:

It's not enough to condemn and deplore violation. The United States and other superpowers, the UN, the European Union, the International Criminal Court should make it clear that those responsible for those atrocities against unarmed, impoverished and weakened populations claiming their rights under decades old, oppressive and repressive dictators in Libya, Gabon, Bahrain, Yemen, Algeria, and soon Cameroon (which is preparing for major protest), would be arrested and prosecuted if the crushing do not stop. The world needs to set new precedents to detract the rise and reign of dictators. How many more killing we must witness or tolerate by these sons of anarchy before we do something about this old problem. It's a fallacy that our national interest often interfere with this worthy cause, the contrary is much plausible.

Russell
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United States
February 23, 2011

Russell in the U.S.A. writes:

Now that "we have received multiple credible reports that hundreds of people have been killed and injured in several days of unrest" I fear the time for words of strong condemnation has ended. Ghadaffi has responded to those words with a merciless military strike on his own civilians. In my opinion, any "leader" that would slaughter his/her own people to maintain power is no leader at all. If for no other reason than to preserve human life some action needs to be taken. By no means should we repeat the Iraq approach. However, we should appeal to the international community and move as one. Ghaddafi only understands action as he has adamantly turned a deaf ear to diplomacy. The Libyan people, like so many others (Yemen, Bharain, Ivory Coast, etc), deserve better than what they are experiencing now.

José M.
|
Spain
February 23, 2011

José R. in Spain writes:

The whole Egyptian army was against the use of force against civilians. They have the power now, supported by their own people. It could work for a beginning. ¿Who knows anyone that could have the same role in Libya? It seems hard to find. This is where the American and European diplomacies have to work.

Char
|
Washington, USA
February 25, 2011

Char in Washington writes:

Intervention by world powers on behalf of saving lives and stopping the carnage in Libya is necessary from a human rights perspective. Qaddafi has shown excessive instability and inhumane treatment toward his own people. It's time for him to go.

Nimrod k.
|
Uganda
March 10, 2011

Nimrod K. in Uganda writes:

who does Gaddaf think he is,why use state power to silence the interests of his countrymen and women of wanting freedom,can't he now do the least he is expected to do '' RESIGN '' and let Libyans enjoy some freedom finally. or the international community please come to Libyans rescue and help to stop Gadaff from all this his madness. thank you.

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