President Obama: "The People of Egypt Have Spoken"

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 11, 2011
President Obama Delivers Remarks at Penn State

Update:View Video

President Barack Obama delivered remarks on Egypt on Friday, February 11, 2011. The President said, "There are very few moments in our lives where we have the privilege to witness history taking place. This is one of those moments. This is one of those times. The people of Egypt have spoken, their voices have been heard, and Egypt will never be the same.

"By stepping down, President Mubarak responded to the Egyptian people's hunger for change. But this is not the end of Egypt's transition. It's a beginning. I'm sure there will be difficult days ahead, and many questions remain unanswered. But I am confident that the people of Egypt can find the answers, and do so peacefully, constructively, and in the spirit of unity that has defined these last few weeks. For Egyptians have made it clear that nothing less than genuine democracy will carry the day.

"The military has served patriotically and responsibly as a caretaker to the state, and will now have to ensure a transition that is credible in the eyes of the Egyptian people. That means protecting the rights of Egypt's citizens, lifting the emergency law, revising the constitution and other laws to make this change irreversible, and laying out a clear path to elections that are fair and free. Above all, this transition must bring all of Egypt's voices to the table. For the spirit of peaceful protest and perseverance that the Egyptian people have shown can serve as a powerful wind at the back of this change.

"The United States will continue to be a friend and partner to Egypt. We stand ready to provide whatever assistance is necessary -- and asked for -- to pursue a credible transition to a democracy. I'm also confident that the same ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit that the young people of Egypt have shown in recent days can be harnessed to create new opportunity -- jobs and businesses that allow the extraordinary potential of this generation to take flight. And I know that a democratic Egypt can advance its role of responsible leadership not only in the region but around the world.

"Egypt has played a pivotal role in human history for over 6,000 years. But over the last few weeks, the wheel of history turned at a blinding pace as the Egyptian people demanded their universal rights.

"We saw mothers and fathers carrying their children on their shoulders to show them what true freedom might look like.

"We saw a young Egyptian say, 'For the first time in my life, I really count. My voice is heard. Even though I'm only one person, this is the way real democracy works.'

"We saw protesters chant 'Selmiyya, selmiyya' -- 'We are peaceful' -- again and again.

"We saw a military that would not fire bullets at the people they were sworn to protect.

"And we saw doctors and nurses rushing into the streets to care for those who were wounded, volunteers checking protesters to ensure that they were unarmed.

"We saw people of faith praying together and chanting -- 'Muslims, Christians, We are one.' And though we know that the strains between faiths still divide too many in this world and no single event will close that chasm immediately, these scenes remind us that we need not be defined by our differences. We can be defined by the common humanity that we share.

"And above all, we saw a new generation emerge -- a generation that uses their own creativity and talent and technology to call for a government that represented their hopes and not their fears; a government that is responsive to their boundless aspirations. One Egyptian put it simply: Most people have discovered in the last few days…that they are worth something, and this cannot be taken away from them anymore, ever.

"This is the power of human dignity, and it can never be denied. Egyptians have inspired us, and they've done so by putting the lie to the idea that justice is best gained through violence. For in Egypt, it was the moral force of nonviolence -- not terrorism, not mindless killing -- but nonviolence, moral force that bent the arc of history toward justice once more.

"And while the sights and sounds that we heard were entirely Egyptian, we can't help but hear the echoes of history -- echoes from Germans tearing down a wall, Indonesian students taking to the streets, Gandhi leading his people down the path of justice.

"As Martin Luther King said in celebrating the birth of a new nation in Ghana while trying to perfect his own, 'There is something in the soul that cries out for freedom.' Those were the cries that came from Tahrir Square, and the entire world has taken note.

"Today belongs to the people of Egypt, and the American people are moved by these scenes in Cairo and across Egypt because of who we are as a people and the kind of world that we want our children to grow up in.

"The word Tahrir means liberation. It is a word that speaks to that something in our souls that cries out for freedom. And forevermore it will remind us of the Egyptian people -- of what they did, of the things that they stood for, and how they changed their country, and in doing so changed the world."

You can watch his remarks here, and you can read his remarks here.

Comments

Comments

Susan C.
|
Florida, USA
February 13, 2011

Susan C. in Florida writes:

Today we should celebrate with them and rejoice for their liberation. Tomorrow we should pray for them and hope for their future. They have a long road ahead of them.

Austin G.
|
Tennessee, USA
February 13, 2011

Austin G. in Tennessee writes:

First, congrats to the brave citizens of Egypt! Second, the previous administration would've (used) the situation in Egypt to again drive the "fear stake" even deeper into our hearts and as another blind excuse to engage our troops ...in yet another senseless middle-eastern conflict. President Obama and Secretary Clinton have handled the entire process with grace, dignity and PEACE. May GOD continue to bless our current administration. OBAMA-BIDEN IN 2012 !!! PS. High IQ's and Compassionate Hearts are the key here.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 13, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Swiss Freeze....

Repatriation of stolen assets anyone?

Egypt could sure use the billions right now.

It shouldn't be from International donors.

It should be from the accounts of those who

robbed Egypt's future for 30 years.

serge
|
California, USA
February 13, 2011

Serge in California writes:

Could President Obama encourage the others autocratic African Ruler (Paul Biya 29 years, Obiang nguema 30 years,Mugabe 30 years,kadhafi 40 years in power ,etc...,) to promote and anticipate the change towards democracy in their countries, and avoid unnecessary lost of human live during mass protest ???

palgye
|
South Korea
February 13, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Over time, the ability to wonder about what is hard to find words to express that I feel still. I learned, I want to see it used once .....

When the British and Israeli cooperation, does he get better results?

English is weak, "President Barack Obama delivered remarks on Egypt" did not see to read, but I think this video is old.

"http://www.whitehouse.gov/video/President-Obama-Speaks-to-the-Muslim-Wor...", manipulation going on here? Or ....

Egypt's young men and women - students from the university? This is sent to the enthusiastic cheers of hope for their lives, their own vested interests that exist in Egypt do not provide politicians did not want to project their own lives, their roo-model two appeared to be due. After the demonstrations, while they hope to present a new economic and social system, while the model suggests, should be encouraged to move forward, ever, President Barack Obama Would not move them the American dream?

Just for some reason young people of Egypt for President Barack Obama personally think that you have a strong will like. All judgments and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton two, depending on the decision we're going to think.

China also said he would like to participate, the drought in China in world food prices affect how much of that is thought to look at the report. Before it's too late ...

PS: When I power, the ability when I want to do something. Judgment before weakening

Ashim C.
|
India
February 13, 2011

Ashim C. in India writes:

As President Mubarak relinquishes power and presidency, it is only proper that it is understood as to what the aspiration of Egyptian are in terms of their universal rights, which President Obama has touched upon in his remarks. International public opinion for change, which USA forcefully articulated (at the cost of being criticised as meddling in Egypt by certain regional powers) in two words "now" and "meaningful" has certainly inspired confidence of protestors and so did the role of Egyptian army. It appears that forces that are driving the developments can only bring glory to Egypt civilizationally. However, possibilities of the change being hijacked cannot be ruled out and if that happens can only happen through influences conservative forces shall try to apply through army or a section of it. The litmus test of positivity in direction of Egyption developments would be whether or not equality in fundamental rights is given to people irrespective of their sex and religion and how fast a new interim constitutional structure is put in place for sharing state power by a cross section of civilian population during the transition period till full constitutionalism is established. One's hunch is it would be better to avoid Presidential form of government and go for parliamentary system. Egyptian people and international community has to be proactively vigilant to infuse meaningfullness to the limited change.

V R.
|
Wisconsin, USA
February 13, 2011

Ray in Wisconsin writes:

Stephan Hadley, former National Security Adviser, should be appointed Special Ambassador to Egypt in charge of assisting the Egyptian people as they create democratic institutions.

Darryl K.
|
California, USA
February 13, 2011

Darryl K. in California writes:

I write this now as I have just witnessed the dawn of the sun rising in Egypt. MABRUK my fellow Egyptians!! Since I have been living and working in Cairo with you for the past four years, I feel especially proud to be at your side at this moment. TODAY February 11th, 2011, is the Egyptian Declaration of Independence... Remember well my dear friends, because you will be telling future generations of Egyptians the historic change you have made this special day.

The Egyptian civilization has given much to our world. Its mystic history, monumental architecture, and lovely poetry have inspired nations including the United States. For the last few days as I have watched the events unfold in Cairo, I have thought about the Washington Monument. It was built by America's founding fathers in the shape of an Egyptian Obelisk pointing up toward the heavens. It is a reminder, that all mankind is mortal and that our truest and greatest inspirations come from the nobel Ideals of our ancient ancestors above. The seeds of democracy are blossoming in the hearts of the Egyptian youth in Tahrir Square, The great spirit of the Sphinx has roared again, calling on its people to stand up and be heard.

The Egyptians have spoken, and the world has listened. The road to freedom is as monumental as the Pyramids. Every free nation began after the revolution of its people. Democracy is hard. You have to not only fight to obtain it, but be wise enough to keep it. I ask the brave faces of protest to calm their tempests of discontent now, and take their place with the free nations of the world. Allow no regime to ever hijack your dreams. Speak now as one Egyptian people. Lift up your heads! You have the power now, use it wisely. The revolution is over. You are victorious.

Over 3 thousand years ago, the great Poet Akhenaten wrote of the Egyptian sun in the sky: "Though you are far, Your light is wide upon the earth; and you shine in the faces of all who turn to follow your jouneying" The world now awaits this new dawn over the nile.

Let the new shining face of Egypt be as lovely as Cleopatra's, and the songs of Umm Kulthum fill the air. As the free Egyptian people continue on their road to true democracy, know that they will have no greater friend than the free American people. Today, we stand with you arm in arm. And tomorrow, we will create, an even more free... and better world for all people.

Long live Egypt!

Darryl John K.

ANTHONY A.
|
Nigeria
February 13, 2011

Anthony A. in Nigeria writes:

In This President Obama Speach,I can see, I can feel, I can touch true democracy in African Continent who has been in bondage for so many years. I wholeheartedly Thank President Obama and The Entire People Of American on their Fatherly role They played for " never wanted to go Mubarak despite the cry of his people for him to go".I, entire people of Egypt and honest Africans that love and cheerish true American Kind of Democracy humbly salute President Obama and entire people of America for this historic victory over "stay - put leaders in African Continent"...Pls, the true journey of true democracy is just starting in African continent, we will come again and again until African continent is librated... God Bless United States of America...Anthony A.

Patrick
|
Maryland, USA
February 13, 2011

Patrick in Maryland writes:

I thought President Barack Obama's remarks,on the progress the people of Egypt made was inspirational. Now they need to continue their pursuit for democracy.

Good Luck People of Egypt, and enjoy your freedoms. :)

Clive D.
|
Oregon, USA
February 13, 2011

Clive D. in Oregon writes:

I am a college instructor in English, journalism, and global studies. When will the time be right to travel to Egypt to assist in the people's cultural transition?

palgye
|
South Korea
February 13, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

The United States will continue to be a friend and partner to Egypt. and also, he want easily.

says45
February 13, 2011

W.W. writes:

Mrs. Secretary, Mr. President,

Poverty it is always a matter of protest.

What is deplored in Egypt is crime used from population begging for Change.

What is a matter of concern is the fact that this matter of protest it has not contributed to create an Egyptian Marting Luther KING solving democratically the sovran Egyptian crisis. North Africa needs politicians not weapons.

Olaniyi a.
|
Nigeria
February 13, 2011

Ahmed O. in Nigeria writes:

It's good to alow the right leader at the right time.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 13, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

What's Wrong with this Picture?

Poor Egyptians put their lives on the line for freedom, and Mubarak gets to go to his palace in Sharm Al-Sheik?

palgye
|
South Korea
February 14, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

South Korea's politics, ideology or faith, rather than policy is still stuck in regionalism, and the politicians get out of the area that the media play, but directly to the people of each region met it's still indulge in regionalism, and other local people despise Hard to believe. Along the area, more than ideology or disappear, follow them at ease in, is the feeling of being filled, the pig.

Wealth accumulation process of the President of Egypt, many Western leaders are linked. Cautious approach is needed. Peace in the Middle East for the first time I thought that was started and the result was well, over time, the accumulation of wealth for individuals, and flows under the assumption of corruption in politics is that you need money. Also, you still want to go to the welfare state, a developing country to think more and more severe. Suggesting protection than they should be approached cautiously, as the new government free from the past to Think. Of course, absolutely necessary for the liquidation of the past, but in Korea's colonial past, because the punishment, the issue still troubling the people here still think. Superior knowledge and ability, wealth, but to try to see and talk when I know the past history of the property accumulated during the colonial period of the current killing ordinary people, looted and stole property and wealth based on the cash cow is still reported to fool people live think.

Property for economic development in addition to the IBRD as a margin deposit to place Should not advisable to make? Inside Egypt have received loans guaranteed by the international think the problem is likely to occur. Spoke briefly, the renewable energy industry and the steel, automobile and price stability in the Middle East and Europe, domestic demand for goods is thought to be the growth industry. The cotton industry is wonderful, the way I see it ...

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 13, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Oh good! The Egyptiasn people have a brand new nation to take for a test drive.

Bravo! Enjoy the ride!

The Spartans had their Three-Hundred, and now Egypt has their 300 who gave all for folks to get the keys to a future with promise in peace and freedom.

I have a suspicion they'll be a lot of nation builders who'll honor their memory.

A people who's ancestors built the pyramids and produced Ptah Hotep's "Good sayings", has a lot of blueprints to work from, so I have no worries of what kind of nation they'll stand up as Egypt.

Couldn't have asked for a nicer mob to help test a theory that "regime replacemet therapy" can be done without a shot fired.

Saddened that it could not be proved in this case, but there is some comfort in that I've concluded the theory is do-able. And of course, all those smiling faces.

So who's next?

Motorcycle F.
February 14, 2011

M.F. writes:

After the news of Mr.Mubarak stepping down,there is a huge relief for the egyptians. The way I see it, better for the economy at least.

John P.
|
Greece
February 14, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico --

QUOTE: "regime replacement therapy" can be done without a shot fired. END OF QUOTE.

There is no doubt you are right and this is exactly how things should always be.

However, I also agree with Susan in Florida: QUOTE: Today we should celebrate with them and rejoice for their liberation. Tomorrow we should pray for them and hope for their future. They have a long road ahead of them. END OF QUOTE.

What I mean is, I’m not sure if it’s a ride, or a long road before we are sure that we have to deal with a “regime replacement therapy”.

And I’d really appreciate your opinion on this. Where is the exact, safe point that can allow us to describe a “regime replacement” as secure and sure? "What if" things go worst than before?

I imagine that “The level of respect a government has for its people's will is commensurate with the level of freedoms they enjoy”. (CHUCKLE)

Until then, until we reach a safe point for conclusions, I am very happy for the people of Egypt.

Their future is in their hands!

Their “nation builders” are their decisions, I’d say!

As long as they will be proved wise decisions!

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 15, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John,

It should be sort of self explanatory in that once regime replacement is conducted to completion, the therapy begins as the people rejoice.

In one respect democracies practice regime replacement therapy routinely in a safe, secure, and reliably predictable civilized manner around election time.

So you must be referring to regime replacement therapy by unruly mob or by military defeat or coup, being a lot less organized of a process they do carry uncertainty and risk, as methods.

more thoughts on this here:

"http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entry/week_2011_02_13"

Best,

EJ

Susan C.
|
Florida, USA
February 15, 2011

Susan C. in Florida writes:

@ John in Greece It is good to see so many "new" voices on the DipNote blog. However, I always smile when I see, and read, comments from "old" friends like yourself. Thank you for your gracious comments on my postings. We must keep the conversation going! It is fascinating to read all the thoughts and comments from around the world. I am learning a great deal and that helps to eliminate misconceptions. True?

John P.
|
Greece
February 16, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Susan in Florida -- “old”? Are you referring to my age? (LOL)

What’s you get is what you deserve! Your posts Susan are always kind, positive, constructive and up to the point.

So, there is nothing gracious!

Well, always the “old school” needs “new voices” to maintain the “spirit”!

It’s really my honor to have met you, Eric and many other regulars inhere.

Even Zharkov (CHUCKLE) –what can I do with the guy? I have to mention him too ‘cause he’s jealous. If I don’t, he will come up with a “John, you don’t like my views, that’s why you did not refer to me. (LOL)

And I’ve learned a lot from all of you! The most important: “to think”, as Eric says.

Every voice in DipNote is unique. You are right! And the most important, even if we disagree, having accepted the basic SD rule that “we agree to disagree”, we are keeping the conversation going. This is the most important in Democracy. Instead of gossiping, create conspiracy theories, putting bombs, or playing the terrorists like idiots and fanatics do, we have choose to exchange ideas in order to make our world better. As much as we can…

Taking this opportunity, I feel that we owe a HUGE “thank You!” to the “DipNote gang”, who are doing an extremely good work. Day by day, and I’m in here for more than three years, the Blog is getting better and better, keeping up with new media techs and ideas.

Of course, “space is the limit”. But, the “gang” does a Great work!

Best Regards to all!

P.S.

@ Joe in TN –we miss your posts. According to my opinion you have so much more to offer, especially when it comes to US-Russian relations and studies. Anyway, I wish you are FINE!

@ Eric in NM –thanks for your reply Bro. Got your point! Thank God your 4X4 survived the recent snow storm (CHUCKLE).

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 16, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John,

Personally I think the Egyptian people are having a lot of fun testing out their new ride...and nothing like a 4x4 to get through the slippery stuff and negotiate the ruts and bumps in an on or off-road setting.

Now it seems they are protesting everything from wages to working conditions and I think it will be awhile before this brand new tool called "protest" is completely investigated in practical applications.

This too is therapy for a society discovering a new "normal" as a state of being.

P.S. I agree, the notion of "old" sort of makes me feel like furniture around here...(chuckle).

@ Susan C., Better to have a long road ahead than a short one where it concerns living. So sometimes you just got to trust that folks will work it out to their satisfaction in their own good time. I'm sure there will be a lot of help offered as appropriate to see their success in the democratic experiment.

One thing's for sure, their prayers have been answered through the people's commitment to freedom.

As John said, you get what you deserve. The folks in Egypt have and so has Mubarak.
That's just karma at work in the world.

A people with thousands of years worth of nation and civilization building on their resume isn't likely to screw this opportunity up.

And perhaps the best kind of support we can offer is having that confidence in them to do right by themselves in standing up a representitive government that will drive Egypt onward through the 21st century.

Enjoyed your post as always, and keep 'em coming.

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
February 16, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico

I watched the news today. I feel like a “domino dancing” is on the Air.

Libya, Bahrain, Iran. Everywhere…

As a “commercial pilot” (CHUCKLE) I do not have neither the knowledge, nor the experience, or the nerve to analyze the probable danger. I mean personally, as a simple civilian, I worry about how much dangerous this “climate” can become.

“What if” all these Islamic groups of people and tribes (I’d call it mosaic) enrich a “social movement” by invoking false religious, political, economic and social characteristics in order to create an anti-western “weapon”?

I mean “what happens” if their “priests” attempt to become “Generals”, once again in history?

… a mosaic-religion arsenal, we won’t be able to stop in order for US to stay alive…

?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 17, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John,

That's quite a hypothetical to ponder, and I think the thing to remember is that what is motivating the movement for democratic and social change is not because of anything the "West" did, or did not do.

It isn't about us, it's about their future and the internal dynamics of Muslim society, as the old gives way to the new generation and their ideas.

The only way I see this resulting in some rabid anti-sentiment based on religious fervor directed at the US or others is if folks try and stand in the way of the tide.

Insted, the US is "going with the flow" in respect to the inevitability of people's desires to be free from tyrany, and as folks look to us for help, reassurance and ultimately recognition of any new governments formed in the wake of change, then it is hard to imagine folks wanting to declare us "the great satan" right off the bat as the the Iranian regime did after coming to power in '79, which pretty well set the tone for the last 31 years of political stupidity from that gov.

You gotta trust folks do learn from other's mistakes, and won't repeat it in their nation.
Trade one tyrant for another one? I think not.

The Arab street isn't stupid, they can see for themselves just how "well off" the Iranian people are under the Ayatollah's boot.

Is this a dangerous situation? Oh heck yeah, a potential bloodbath in some countries like Iran who's regime doesn't give a damn about human rights or shooting down people in the street.

Now I ask myself what it would take for nations to have influence on the government of Iran to deal with their people in a peaceful manner? And I think what it would take would be no less than the threat of a joint declaration of war on the government of Iran by NATO/US and others if we wish not to be witness to crimes against humanity any longer perpetrated by that regime. Otherwise I flat guarantee folks will be.

'cause that's what it will take, and follow-up on that promise to take action is a real good possibility if folks have to go this rout. Folks will have to show they mean buisiness. Don't do it half-way or half-assed with half-measures and half the funding needed, if folks want the results produced quickly that end the threats.

But you know John, when you consider how dangerous it is to leave tyrants like this in power, to support terror globally, to build WMD, to terrorize their own people, destabilize nastions, and violate UN charter and sanctions imposed, then I must ask, does the fact that the Iranian regime remain still in power today a facet of political insanity on the part of the "West"?

Or just a facet of lack of common sense, or political will, or both?

Every day that regime remains in power in Iran is another day the world is appeasing their criminality by doing nothing permanent to stop it or put an end to it.

And if that's what America ends up doing with a coalition of the willing then I gurantee you the only question put to the US in critisism by the the Arab street will be "What took you so long?"

And we'll be scratching our heads trying to answer that for the Iranian people.

Yesterday would have been good.

But then, when has any nation gone to war with another over human rights violations?

Well there's a precedent to be set I guess.

Right about now there's an inescapable reality presidential advisors should tell their boss, "The Iranian government doesn't care if you call them hypocrites, it's just more idle commentary from the international peanut gallery to them. If you want results, show them you are kineticly serious about them remaining peaceful with their people as they raise voice in protest on the street."

So I guess I'll just say it publicly here and let it filter on up.

EJ

Susan C.
|
Florida, USA
February 24, 2011

Susan C. in Florida writes:
I appreciate the moderate tone President Obama is taking. All of the situations, whether national or international, that the President is facing are very difficult and it must be frustrating and discouraging for him to constantly hear that he is not handling things right. I, for one, am rooting for him and he will have my vote in 2012. The Republicans, and the Tea Party "folks", have done nothing to help this country. Their ideas and tactics will continue to burden the poor and the middle class until they destroy this nation. They don't even know what our Constitution says, or what Reagan actually did during his Presidency. They should read up on both, for their ignorance is showing. Every President faces great challenges. President Obama is facing some of the greatest since FDR. So Congress stop the "same old, same old". Start REALLY caring about this country and about the people who are burdened and struggling out here. Wow, what an idea!!!

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 19, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

BBC reports today state that machine guns and morters have been used on unarmed protesters in Bengazi, Lybia, with some 80 killed and many more wounded.

Now if Ghaddafi wants to terrorize his people, then may I respectfully suggest in the strongest possible terms that to stand by US policy in insisting on non-violence of governments in dealing with protesters, that it may require the use of force to establish the seriousness of intent in enforcing that policy with some governments.

I think it would be good to do a close flyover of Ghadaffi's tent palace to remind him how we deal with those who would kill the innocent, and give him a sense of deja vu'.

One thing for sure, doing so would impress the people of the region we're willing to stand up for their rights, and not just with rhetoric and condemnation of these atrocities, but with the means to "level the playing field" if need be.

If anyone has a better idea I would think now would be the time to implement it.

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
February 20, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico

It’s already 100 dead people in Libya, 2 in Yemen and still counting…

QUOTE: "regime replacement therapy" can be done without a shot fired. END OF QUOTE.

Some others in Egypt, and who knows the exact numbers and if their regimes there (in so many Muslim countries) say the truth. I doubt they do! Do you expect Iran to announce that they have 1000 dead civilians already? They will never do it.

That’s why I hope my views to remain hypothetical to ponder and never be proven right on this. I really mean this! I prefer peace and peaceful solutions.

But you see, my dear good friend, a bullet says always the truth! And obviously, either allows the "regime replacement therapy", or stops it. Depending on the way it comes from. Unfortunately for our civilization, “bullets” and “being prepared” are parameters of Freedom. Our “western” Freedom.

What I mean is, you wrote it yourself already:
QUOTE: it may require the use of force to establish the seriousness of intent in enforcing that policy with some governments.
I think it would be good to do a close flyover of Ghadaffi's tent palace to remind him how we deal with those who would kill the innocent, and give him a sense of deja vu'. END OF QUOTE.

That’s what I meant in tens of previous posts of mine when I was talking about a strong “US Pentagon & NATO”. It’s the only way for all of us to feel SECURE.

During such crisis the most “heavy” communication device in the world is Robert Gate’s telephone, because always on the other side there is a voice saying: Robert, what can we do if things go worst? Please help us…

That’s why I always insist on a very strong Pentagon + Intel.

Once again, some readers will call me an “Eagle”, or whatever. I don’t care. If they insist too, they can just send me my fourth star. (CHUCKLE)

Very good post Bro!

.

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