Secretary Clinton Calls Egyptian Vice President Omar Soliman

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 3, 2011
Demonstrators Clash in Egypt

More:Information for U.S. Citizens Currently in Egypt | Public Service Announcement

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called Egyptian Vice President Omar Soliman today to convey that today's violence was a shocking development after many days of consistently peaceful demonstrations. The Secretary urged that the Government of Egypt hold accountable those who were responsible for violent acts.

Secretary Clinton also underscored the important role that the Egyptian Armed Forces have played in exercising restraint in the face of peaceful demonstrations and expressed concern that all parties recommit themselves to using only peaceful means of assembly.

Noting Vice President Soliman's call for a broad dialogue with representatives of Egypt's opposition parties, the Secretary expressed hope that both the government and the opposition would seize the opportunity, starting immediately, for serious, meaningful negotiations about Egypt's transition to a more open, pluralistic, and democratic government. Lastly, the Secretary noted that the United States remains committed to working in partnership with Egypt in helping to achieve the aspirations of the Egyptian people.

You can also read the text of this media note on www.state.gov.Related Content:Attacks on Demonstrators and Journalists in Egypt

Comments

Comments

Cynthia
|
California, USA
February 2, 2011

Cynthia in California writes:

Enough. It's past time for Mubarak to leave. I hope the Egyptian military will step in and remove him immediately. Too bad if his feelings are hurt. Soliman, you say you aren't queasy about torture, so you shouldn't be queasy about showing Mubarak the door. Protect your countrymen and Egypt.

cynthia p.
|
United States
February 2, 2011

Cynthia P. in the U.S.A. writes:

"The Secretary urged that the Government of Egypt hold accountable those who were responsible for violent acts."

What if the Government of Egypt is responsible for the violence? Are they to hold themselves accountable?

nicholas
|
Georgia, USA
February 3, 2011

Nicholas in Georgia (U.S.A.) writes:

please let Mubarak go or else all those demonstrators are dead. before sepetember most of them will be dead they will just play the news and pick up all those people who spoke. african dictators are no cowards even if they are the thugs and followers are not. how can he hold hiw hench men accountable when he gives the order.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
February 3, 2011

Joseph M. in Oregon writes:

The violence at Tahrir Square undoubtedly will escalate today as early reports of escalted violence are being aired by the media. Historically, this is uncharted territory for modern day Egyptian society. The Mubarak regime has demonstrated today, by attacking the demonstrators, that they are determined in dissolving this grass-roots peaceful movement who are seeking democratic reform. I am absolutely horrified in hearing the first BBC World News reports early today, coming from Tahrir Square, this escalation of violence is unacceptable. I would like to see the U.S. administration, take a very firm stance against the Mubarak regime led violence, resulting in several deaths and numerous casualties. I stand in solidarity with the Egyptians tonight and with their bravery in seeking democracy. Is this the "peaceful transition that the U.S. President Obama spoke of yesterday evening?" As the violent clashes break out today, igniting Tahrir Square, the U.S. Administration should acknowledge that the immediate resignation of Mubarak, would be in the best interests for the Egyptian people and for the international community. We should view the change of leadership with Mubarak stepping down, as a enormous opportunity for democratic change not only for Egypt but for other Arab nations in the region, representative by a grass-roots movement that began in Cairo and represent the will of the Egyptians. The Egyptian people are seeking an immediate change, they have a right to facilitate the process of forming an intern government up until full elections may be held.

The recent political unrest expressed by the Egyptians, the wave of protests and the recent uprising by the people, should be viewed as a "teachable moment for the Obama administration".

The people of Egypt, are exemplifying the process of democracy, they should decide and vote for their next leader and government. They are entitled in having their individual rights, civil liberties acknowledged and their voices heard, by engaging in a newly formulated democratic process. The international community should be closely consulting and listening to the EU member states and Turkey as to what should be next for Egypt after Mubarak resigns, not the Saudi Monarchy and King Abdullah, who are more concerned with the potential future changes for the Middle-Eastern political landscape in a future post Mubarak Egypt. Mubarak as Egypt's leader, should adhere to the will of Egyptians calling for his dismissal.

anya
|
California, USA
February 3, 2011

Anya in California writes:

I really want the US to pull *ALL* aid from Egypt. We should not be supporting this dictator, most particularly when most of the entire country of Egypt is tired of this dictator and want a change!

NICHOLAS M.
|
Georgia, USA
February 3, 2011

Nicholas M. in Georgia (U.S.A.) writes:

Dearest Mrs Clinton all those demonstrators are dead people walking especially those who showed their faces on tv to talk and complain. for now all the empty homes and businesses are being monitored, all the twwets, face book accounts as well. dealing with dictators in Africa is no joke you risk death if you do not achieve your aim. I pity all those women, kids and young men. at least if there is negotiations at this time it will be better than when they go home with Mubarak in power some one has to pay for the damage, the dignity lost the demonstration and the burnt out buildings. many of these demonstration will be execute by gangs no doubt about that and buried in the desert. please do something for these people because when they decide to put their lives on line then every one will call for a jihad against any one who is against them . they have nothing to face but death now. six months reform cannot account for 30 years of emergency rule

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 3, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Crisis Induction v. Human Security

Mubarak, a despot, is now responsible for crimes against humanity. How does he get to a podium? What is the USG and International Community afraid of? How can we continue to recognize sovereignty in a state which induces crisis as a response to the people's call for Human Security?

mohamed a.
February 3, 2011

Mohamed A. in Africa writes:

the egyptian revolutian train has left the station.its time western nations decide who they support,its obvious they feel grateful for the 30 y of mubarak oppresion of his nation that benefitted the west.with or without usa help mubarak is going down soon,there will be no orderly transition to another usa pupet.dont craft your policies based upon israeli fears.game over.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 3, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Domestic Renditions....Egypt Implodes.

Journalists Attacked...

Media/Internet/Cellphone/lockdowns/blackouts

Video Surveillance/roundups/targeted violence

stepped up rhetoric and repression

UN troop withdrawal....US Evacs.

Where's the Intervention?

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 3, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Egyptenstein.....

"...it's alive, alive!"

A result of decades of geo-political, economic and social experimentation.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 4, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Mubarak has already set his succession and has provided the forwarding address for the $1.5 b.

He's the arsonist who is shouting "Fire".

End it.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 5, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Dominoes........

Middle-east got the e-memo on Freedom.

Time to convene the regional leadership to craft a new design that works for all the people. The despots will fall down by themselves; focus on the donut...not on the hole.

.

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