Join a Discussion on U.S. Efforts To Combat Human Trafficking

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 2, 2011
Live: Conversations With America on U.S. Efforts To Combat Human Trafficking

On Tuesday, February 8, 2011, Luis CdeBaca, Ambassador-at-Large to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, will hold a conversation with Wade Henderson, President and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, on U.S. efforts to monitor and combat modern slavery. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Benton, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Public Affairs and streamed live on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog, at 3:30 p.m. ET. You are invited to participate by submitting questions, some of which will be selected for response during the live broadcast. Submit your questions now in the comment section below.

This is the ninth in the Conversations with America video series coordinated by the Bureau of Public Affairs, in which the State Department's senior leadership hosts discussions live, online, with leaders of prominent non-governmental organizations. Discussion topics include foreign policy and global issues and provide a candid view of how leaders from civil society engage the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

Comments

Comments

Steve E.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
February 2, 2011

Steve E. in Washington, DC writes:

Is there a joint task force of US law enforcement agencies, INTERPOL, and law enforcement agencies from both origin and destination countries? If so, how active is it? If not, why not?

Donna B.
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California, USA
February 2, 2011

Donna B. in California writes:

Human Trafficking violations in 1958, state-side # 1 issue which began early work then in 1959, with President Eisenhower and many as witness within The Oval Offices to begin business of peace, both A Partnership for Peace (p4p), and as a division of The Blue Roses, est. 1959.

What good are laws when not enforced by those who govern? While being asked to continue work to help the United Nations on their 8 issues, please note Human Trafficking is not on the list. Please refer to docs which pried open the doors in Human Declaration of Rights. Would your side be open, as duty is to promote peace through education, to join others who are listening on issue which helps funds the drug trafficking, wars, etc., both state-side and on international basis?

Mohammad T.
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Germany
February 2, 2011

Mohammad T. in Germany writes:

this is a very important issue and we should fight against the human trafficking which is a big concern today in the world...

do to this human trafficking hundreds of people are losing their lives every year around the world specially the people who are coming from Asia and Africa to Europe and the United states, dozens of women, men and children are being raped by the human traffickers every year in the world, this is plus kidnapping and blackmailing of people and the income of the human trafficking is going for the use of terrorism which is getting more powerful every day and this is by the help of Mafia who is the FedEx and Wall mart of the international terrorism...

i blame for this the UNHCR United Nations High Commissionaire for Refugees which is full of corrupts in everywhere and they waste big amounts of money for some useless programs... even if was much better before the year 2004 that the embassies of the countries like United States, Canada, UK, Australia and so many others used to accept the asylum cases directly from the refugees, but after the year 2004 very unfortunately the mentioned embassies somehow trusted the UNHCR and gave this permission of accepting refugee and asylum cases only to UNHCR which is playing with the lives of the people and make very slow and delay on the case decisions and even in the case decisions there are some particular people who decides for the fates of the poor country less people, the decisions which has been taken without observing the cases very carefully they reject the cases or keep the poor people waiting who have nothing to eat and they give them nothing, these all reasons are making the people to go after the Mafias and human traffickers to take them to a safe place in Europe or in the US....

first we should find the reasons and the roots of the things which are making the people to leave their homelands and the second thing that we should focus more on the UNHCR and other related organizations who can stop these people to give up themselves as slaves for the human traffickers....

in UNHCR of Ukraine only the locals are working and everything is in their hands, so what is the guarantee that there is no corruption? in UNHCR of Tajikistan the refugee case which have been approved are for sale in very low prices, the people who gave the interview deserved to go to a third country are being informed that your case has been rejected, but the other people who has paid for the employees or facilitators of the UNHCR are going to the third country by the names of the other people.....

JUST THINK ABOUT IT THAT WHAT IS GOING ON AROUND US AND WHERE ARE WE NOW?????? EVERYTHING IS UNJUST WHICH ARE FOR JUSTICE.....

if the situation gos like this the disaster will be much bigger than today....

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 2, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Too much Monitor; not enough Combat....

When will we seize the assets of Global TIP and convey them to create dignified futures for victims and targeted persons?

Nikolaus H.
|
United States
February 2, 2011

Nikolaus H. in the U.S.A. writes:

Trafficking always needs to be seen in context with immigration laws. After all this is why traffickers can succeed - because immigration laws prevent people from coming legally.

But, before anything is combated, good intelligence needs to be gathered on how trafficking works.

It's a very complex problem, and one that happens at several distinct levels. I have personally - as a 3rd party - witnessed this in a case where it would be very hard to file charges against anyone, and I believe that that's the most common case. Women were offered to do sex work in foreign countries and agreed to that - upon arrival they were told they "owed" a months work of free work. 8 customers per day. However, the traffickers do actually in the end provide the promised 50/50 split in income to the prostitutes which means that supply doesn't stop, and it means some choose to stay on their own free will. Others want out of this "deal" they're forced into immediately - those can't as their passports have been taken and they're illegals hunted by the police. They also have no money so they can't really go anywhere.

Some are held as modern day slaves, but we need to take a close look how that is achieved - there is always something... some trafficked persons want to be rescued but I'd wager a guess and say many or even most don't.

The most effective way to address this issue I think would be in the form of street workers, not official law enforcement. Law enforcement always has a conflict of interest helping these people due to immigration laws. So if you want to help - help. If you don't - because the trafficked are illegal - then don't. Deporting them back to where they came from, for the most part, is not helping them.

Psychotherapist K.
|
Texas, USA
February 2, 2011

Kenneth K. in Texas writes:

Little gets into the media on human trafficking. How do we increase awareness?

Meredith L.
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District Of Columbia, USA
February 3, 2011

Meredith L. in Washington, DC writes:

The upcoming 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation is a date that many in the U.S. will commemorate. For both of you, how might the proclamation's promise and the legacy of the era's anti-slavery activists best be honored?

TL G.
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Texas, USA
February 3, 2011

TL G. in Texas writes:

US victim assistance, especially for domestic minors sex trafficking victims has been repeadedly stalled. There are groups trying to establish safe houses all across the country and provide leadership to the movement. They are struggling the with establishment protocols and funding streams due to many complicated factors that vary from state to state. What leadership role can this forum take in calling for a coordinated effort across the federal and state levels that work with public/private ventures in practical ways?

Lily.W
|
Minnesota, USA
February 3, 2011

Lily W. in Minnesota writes:

In my experience working in Thailand by the Burma border, human trafficking is a massive problem. People are being trafficked from Burma to Thailand. They were probably promised with jobs in factories or in a restaurant. Women raped by the traffickers are daily stories, and many of them are sold into prostitution. The poor Burmese people do not have proper documentations. Upon arrival in Thailand, most of them end up sticking with the pimp for fear of deportation or they just simply can't escape. Eventually they became the modern day slaves in a foreign land without any rights. Many of the victims are children and women. Is there any International authority that will protect the right of these unfortunate people? Will the UN offer solution on this kind of problem?

Elizabeth
|
Ghana
February 6, 2011

Elizabeth in Ghana writes:

Human Trafficking (especially child trafficking) is real in Ghana. How do we obtain adequate funding from the G/TIP? Child migrants are vulnerable, how can G/TIP support them to prevent trafficking?

Robert M.
|
Georgia
February 6, 2011

Robert M. in Georgia (U.S.A.) writes:

That sounds wonderful. Thank you team and friends.

Richard S.
|
Michigan, USA
February 7, 2011

Richard S. in Michigan writes:

My family and I certainly echo and reiterate what TL G. from Texas had posted on Thursday Feb. 3, 2011, in response to this event.

As victims ourselves, since March 16, 2007, of domestic minor sex trafficking, we tirelessly worked together with the State of Michigan to prosecute the drug-dealer who provided the narcotics causing the death of our 17-year old great granddaughter, granddaughter, daughter, sister and niece including our accepting an out-of-court settlement with the strip-club who knowingly hired Stephanie as a minor.

At the federal level, I have personally sat with Madam Secretary Hilda Solis of the Department of Labor and told our family’s tragic story about how Stephanie was trafficked within the blink of an eye and the last few days of her life.

Therefore, I too would like to know, “What leadership role can this forum take in calling for a coordinated effort across the federal and state levels that work with public/private ventures in practical ways?” Especially when our family has started two-nonprofits “Stephanie’s Place” and “AhEeCOSH – Adult Entertainment Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health” to help the U.S. end/stop human trafficking – modern/day slavery!

Thank you for your due diligent consideration and anticipated response.

Respectfully, Richard A. S., PD/PI

MIke E.
|
Virginia, USA
February 7, 2011

Mike E. in Virginia writes:

What interagency efforts are being taken, specificlly with the Department of Defense in the Pacific, to address human trafficking? Is there a chance of an interagency task force or JIACG to address this issue?

Pamela M.
|
California, USA
February 7, 2011

Pamela M. in California writes:

As an activist/resource coordinator, am seeking funding for collaborators and welcome your suggestions to identify as many opportunities as possible.

Richard S.
|
Michigan, USA
February 7, 2011

Richard S. in Michigan writes:

I recently attended the Michigan Journal of International Law 2011 Symposium which was most enlightening and the “Successes and Failures in International Human Trafficking Law” presentation by Ambassador CdeBaca as our Keynote Speaker, was well regarded and indeed highly respected by everyone without exception or question including myself and those I represent.

However, there are many, many survivors of human trafficking victims living across America, all our families, friends and neighbors would ask indeed and like to know, “How can we join together and do more with and for each-other, our government agencies, congress and the world-at-large to help U.S. Efforts to Combat Human Trafficking?”

We believe this would indeed be the prober time and place during, “Conversations with America” to address these concerns that so many survivors of human trafficking want to know where to turn, share our stories and talk about the personal suffering we must endure without knowing who to trust before someone really listens. Yes, we do want to help U.S. Efforts to Combat Human Trafficking by saving so many others from a fate worse than death.

Respectfully submitted and in anticipation of further discussion,

Richard A. S., PD/PI

Mohab S.
|
Egypt
February 7, 2011

Mohab E. in Egypt writes:

Dear Excellency, Greetings;

First of all, it is a great honor to me, to write you this message on behalf of the United Nations Youth Club and on my own behalf. I' am writing from here in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt where we all struggle for freedom and the universal rights of humanity. Today; we hope to get your support for our initiative "the Global Day to Fight Human Trafficking: A Global Demand."

It will be our opportunity to well invest as well direct our response to the legacy of President Abraham Lincoln around the world, and to honor of the 202nd anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), the man who devoted himself for problem of the slave trade and particularly the African victims.

Mohab E.
Secretary-General, United Nations Youth Club (NGO)

"http://www.change.org/petitions/the-global-day-to-fight-human-traffickin...""http://www.ungift.org/doc/knowledgehub/resource-centre/UNYC_Child_Friend..."

Norma R.
|
New York, USA
February 7, 2011

Norma R. in New York writes:

It is the demand for commercial sexual exploitation that is fueling sex trafficking both here and abroad. Sweden passed the world’s first human rights based legal approach, now known as the Nordic model, that criminalizes the men who would buy the bodies of others for sexual exploitation. This law treats the prostituted as victims. This law has now proven to be effective at discouraging human trafficking.

A) Do you support this legal model?

B) If so what are you doing to promote it both here in the US and around the world?

Jerome B.
|
Michigan, USA
February 8, 2011

Jerome T.B. in Michigan writes:

Where or Where is the Loop? Where is the reciprocation? I get basically kidnapped by George H.W. Bush, Sr., and friends when I am 2 & 1/2 years of age, get signed up to do all this writing for the Beatles, Steven Spielberg and others, and I get nothing back. How Pompous, misleading, deceitful and very Pretentious on the United States Government's part. Those people are still collecting awards and revenues and here we are in the U.S. without jobs, losing our homes, spending retirement benefits to pay bills.

ZOE C.
|
California, USA
February 8, 2011

ZCH in California writes:

Our organization is exploring the possibility of opening an aftercare shelter for human trafficking victims under age 12. Have you seen a significant need for shelter beds for victims this young?

Matei I.
|
Romania
February 8, 2011

Matei M.I. in Romania writes:

What can you do to help victims of trafficking in Romania, when children as young as 15 are shown all over TV and are called whores, and the location of the shelter where they are supposed to be protected is revealed, and it's called a "whore house", and no Governmental Organization responsible with combating trafficking reacts?

Remo S.
|
Philippines
February 8, 2011

Remos S. in the Philippines writes:

1. The United States Government has been a strong advocate against Human Trafficking in Persons, giving more emphasis on the prevention, protection, and prosecution programs. However, most cooperating nations including the Philippines are weak on the prosecution aspect of the program. How can you help enforce this weakness to encourage nations bring violators to justice.

2. There are numbers of NGO that are potentially capable of helping promote the US gov't advocacy against Trafficking in Persons. However, these entities do not have the logistical capability and practically vulnerable to retribution from big time human trafficking syndicates if found to be cutting across their way. Is the U.S government willing to step in to provide support on finance and security to NGO volunteers? If so, up to what extent?

3.TIP normally happens with the same degree of cooperation from law enforcement community particularly the police and immigration. Is there any U.S. sponsored program to stop this malpractice? If so, what particular U.S. programs are immediately available to countries including the Philippines in order to address this law enforcement malpractice?

4. TIP is a transnational crime. It transcends no boundaries and happens everyday, everywhere. Under this premise, is there a move to link all participating NGO's worldwide in order to have speedy exchange of realtime information or data that may help interdict a crime in progress and possibly assist in the arrest of suspects? Is the United States Government willing to spearhead such move of linking volunteer NGO's internationally ?

Jerome B.
|
Michigan, USA
February 8, 2011

Jerome T.B. in Michigan writes:

Isn't the technique of "Stealing a Child's brains" a form of human trafficing? Stealing under aged children's IDEAS and writings and dreams and passing them on to someone else so they can prosper. where is the Loop? where is the reciprocation?

Christina R.
|
Tennessee, USA
February 8, 2011

Christina R. in Tennessee writes:

As a university graduate student in International Relations I've been looking for law schools that concentrate on human rights law but specifically those that concentrate on laws that combat human trafficking. Is there an initiative to expand into law schools across the United States to train law students specifically to become prosecutors against human/sex trafficking? I've only found one law school that has this type of concentration.

Joseph T.
|
Maryland, USA
February 8, 2011

Joseph T. in Maryland writes:

What is being done by the State Department to combat trafficking of foreign workers into the US via guest worker programs, such as the H2A and H2B visas?

Safe H.
|
New York, USA
February 8, 2011

S.H. in New York writes:

Ambassador CdeBaca,

We are a non-governmental organization that has been assisting foreign national victims of trafficking who have chosen to remain in the U.S. for the past ten years. We have worked with over 450 clients and have found that one of the most important issues for our clients is safe and prompt reunification with their family members. Many of our clients have been separated from their loved ones for years. Applying for family member resettlement to the U.S. is the only real means of increasing the safety of the loved ones of those who have reported their exploitation to the authorities.

However, reunification with family members can often be cost-prohibitive for our clients and their families, which only further delays (or completely precludes) the reunification process. In the past, we have very much counted on the assistance of IOM’s Family Reunification program to help our clients fund and navigate the reunification process. With staff around the world, no other organization has the capacity to provide the specialized assistance that derivative family members overseas need; moreover, with the myriad needs of trafficking survivors, domestic NGOs don’t have sufficient funding to help cover the costs.

We are concerned that funding will not be available for IOM’s program in the future and want to know what the U.S. government will be able to do to ensure that this much-needed resource is not furhter limited.

Thank you for your continued support of our efforts.

Peter W.
|
California, USA
February 8, 2011

Peter W. in California writes:

Ambassador CdeBaca,

I just wanted to comment and say that it is my sincere wish that US policy on trafficking shift back to a policy of forcing forced labor of all kinds, and away from the simplistic anti-vice campaign that this was turned into under the previous administration. The misguided effort that forced out Nancy Ely-Raphel, the first head of the trafficking office, and the abandonment of the fight against labor exploitation in favor of a moral crusade against commercial sex is well documented, and something the current office should put behind it.

I also believe that messages such as are seen here touting the "Nordic model" should be ignored. It is not a human rights model of dealing with the reality of sex work, nor has there been any verification of its "success" by any independent source, nor is it supported by the very sex workers who it claims to benefit. It is also like to be impossible to implement in the US due to likely violation of the Equal Protection Clause.

Thank you for your consideration.

Colton G.
|
Texas, USA
June 14, 2011

Colton G. in Texas writes:

Afternoon, my names colton, im from a small city in Texas. Im only 14, and i know a topic like this is no place for a kid of my age. However, I have never been so impacted on a topic before. As every 14 year old has had, i have had many goals in life. But helping the U.S. in preventing sex trafficking is my true goal in life. I really wanna help those girls and women out there, so please e-mail me back and let me know what i can do to help. I really believe one day, we can end sex trafficking for good

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 14, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Colton G., Age is a matter of mind over matter, if you don't mind it doesn't matter. What matters is that you care enough to write.

Welcome to the blog,
EJ

eve i.
|
Norfolk Island
November 25, 2011

Eve I. in Australia writes:

As a contractor, I address some of these issues are a regular basis thanks for making sense!

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