Secretary Clinton Addresses the Situation in Egypt

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 30, 2011
A Crowd Demonstrates in Alexandria, Egypt

Update:Consular Information for Egypt | Public Service Announcement

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton addressed the situation in Egypt today during interviews with ABC, CBS, CNN, FOX and NBC. Secretary Clinton said:

"...For 30 years, the United States, through Republican and Democratic administrations, has been urging the Mubarak government to take certain steps. In fact, we've been urging that a vice president be appointed for decades, and that finally has happened. But there"s a long way to go...and our hope is that we do not see violence; we see a dialogue opening that reflects the full diversity of Egyptian civil society, that has the concrete steps for democratic and economic reform that President Mubarak himself said that he was going to pursue, and that we see the respect for human rights for Egyptian people and the kind of progress that will lead to a much more open, political, and economic set of opportunities for the Egyptian people."

The Secretary continued, "...We want to see an orderly transition so that no one fills a void, that there not be a void -- that there be a well thought out plan that will bring about a democratic, participatory government. And I also believe strongly that this is in Egypt's long-term interests, it's in the interests of the partnership that the United States has with Egypt. So that is what we are attempting to promote and support, because clearly, what we don't want is chaos. I don't think the Egyptian people want that. They want their grievances to be addressed. We also don't want to see some takeover that would lead not to democracy, but to oppression and the end of the aspirations of the Egyptian people.

"So this is an intensely complex situation. It does not lend itself to quick yes-or-no, easy answers, but instead, I think the path that President Obama has charted, that we are pursuing, that calls for no violence, that supports the aspirations and human rights of the Egyptian people, that stands behind concrete steps toward democratic and economic reform is the right path for all of us to be on."

Secretary Clinton also spoke about consular services for Americans who are in Egypt. The Secretary said, "...We are following the conditions for American citizens extremely closely. This is one of my highest responsibilities, Chris. And we have authorized voluntary departure, which means that we will assist American citizens to leave Egypt. We have warned that there should not be any nonessential travel to Egypt. Thankfully, right now, there are no reports of Americans killed or injured. Again, I thank the Egyptian army for the support and security that they have provided. But we are watching it closely and we are assisting Americans who wish to leave."

U.S. citizens wishing to depart Egypt via U.S. government, chartered transportation should contact us at EgyptEmergencyUSC@state.gov or 1-202-501-4444. You can find up-to-date consular information for Egypt on travel.state.gov.

Please click on the following links for the full transcripts of Secretary Clinton's interviews:
Interview With Christiane Amanpour of ABC's This WeekInterview With Bob Schieffer of CBS's Face The NationInterview With Candy Crowley of CNN's State Of The UnionInterview With Chris Wallace of Fox News SundayInterview With David Gregory of NBC's Meet The Press

Comments

Comments

Ron
|
New York, USA
January 30, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

The Shifting Plates....

The US must be reeling from the Shifting Plate Techtonics of Freedom...Tunis, Egypt, SouthSudan,Jordan, Yemen, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, S.Korea...We must find our footing and recognize the reflection of our own history and mission as a democratic state.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
January 30, 2011

Joseph M. in Oregon writes:

When I first read of Tunisia, I knew this was more than just Tunisians expressing their discontent with their government. Now seemingly, this is having a 'domino affect' in the region and for the Arab World. My guess would be look out for: Algeria, Yemen and Jordan next.

I think Mubarak's days are incredibly numbered, with El Baradei's return "sheer mayhem is liable to develop on streets from Cairo to Alexandria" not only today but continue throughout the night and into next week. Mubarak should acknowledge that he no longer represents the interests of the Egyptian people and step down with dignity. The U.S. should not expect a authoritarian ruler, who has been in place for thirty years, remains in a favorable position in representing democracy for the region. Its time for change in Egypt and this obviously will have a "profound impact in the region" and for other Arab states who share a longstanding history of authoritarian rule, economic turmoil and commonalities in demographics. A change for the political landscape is in the air. God Bless the people of Egypt, that they may achieve the democratic change they have been seeking! Insha'Allah!

Christian T.
|
California, USA
January 30, 2011

Christian T. in California writes:

I am very optimistic for the people of Egypt. That includes the people in the streets protesting and for the Mubarak government. It is my hope that the Egyptian People maintain peace and civility, preventing any injury, death or violence. The Mubarak government has done an outstanding job in helping maintain 30 years of stability in the region. But it looks like the people of Egypt, with respect to President Mubarak, are ready for change. I think they are ready for political and economic reforms. They all have dreams and aspirations for their families and reform will help the Egyptian People reach and exceed their potential. I hope President Mubarak will be a humble servant to his people and sincerely be their advocate. Hopefully he will show grace and leadership by helping Egypt create a real democracy.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
January 31, 2011

Joseph M. in Oregon writes:

I agree with Christian T.,that Mubarak should acknowledge that he as a leader no longer represents the interests and the will of the Egyptian people, he should step down willingly and with dignity. As events continually unfold, I'm optimistic as well for the people of Egypt, for what ever changes in government will follow, that this process should be respected by the U.S. administration and will undoubtedly impact the region and influence other Arab nations. I am certain that if and when they decide to form a new government, the Egyptians already realize that there are pre-existing treaties in place that impact, Gaza, Sinai and the region. They are looking for economic and political reform, more of a say as to who should lead and follow a thirty year old regime, that did not really have a good track-record for being supportive of individual rights and economic reforms.

The sign held by one of the demonstrators at Tahrir Square Saturday night in Cairo, pretty much sums it up for Mubarak it reads: "Game Over".

NICHOLAS
|
Georgia, USA
January 31, 2011

Nicholas in Georgia writes:

i was against Us selling tons and billions of arms to middle east countries what will happen when the islamist take over. there is one thing The US does not understand we have no friends the friends we have are only there because of our money. have you seen a generous person with friends no no no. i wonder which countries will be eager to send us monies which we send to isreal, jordan, iraq, pakistan and egypt. america wake up we are doing the world no favour we have too many enemies but we just do not want to agree its about time we do the immigration stuff to get enough soldiers for the wars that are about to be set upon us. russia, the arab world china, iran. sudan are all on us.we need statemen who can read the koran after the surah one you should know what is th deal Mrs clinton please let some one read the koran. i love america nd the people but we have too many enemies whom we think are our friends.

we need to get our soldiers ready. iran is not the problem but the Moslem's countries whom we think are our friends.please just put america in the shoes of these countries and see how they think after reading the koran. china is just waiting for us to attack north korea, iran and then our economy will collapse if we do not attack our popularity will fall. we have not heard china or russia say anything about egypt algeria, yemen, jordan or tunisia. is nay one listening

Zharkov
|
United States
January 31, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Yes, it is a mess.

There is a simple answer - stay out of it until the smoke clears. Then try to work with whatever government remains.

Instead of sending more military goods and money, cut off government aid and apply that money to sending Egyptian people some food until their economy recovers.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
January 31, 2011

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

The recent political unrest expressed by the Egyptians, the wave of protests and the recent uprising by the people, should be viewed as a "teachable moment for the Obama administration". The people of Egypt, are exemplifying the process of democracy, they should decide and vote for their next leader and government. They are entitled in having their individual rights, civil liberties acknowledged and their voices heard, by engaging in a newly formulated democratic process. This process will ultimately result in having the Egyptian people participate in selecting a new government. This process by the Egyptians should be politically inclusive, for the first time in thirty years.

The international community should be closely consulting and listening to the EU member states and Turkey as to what should be next for Egypt after Mubarak resigns, not the Saudi Monarchy and King Abdullah, and not so much the Israelis, who are more concerned with the potential future changes for the political landscape in a post Mubarak Egypt. The massive demonstrations scheduled for Tuesday, could easily become the decisive moment for the future of Mubarak as Egypt's leader, he should adhere to the will of Egyptians calling for his dismissal. The changes that occur in Egypt over the next few days is likely to impact the region and I foresee potentially, further uprisings in several other Arab nations: Yemen, Algeria, and Jordan. We should welcome democratic change if this results in a "domino affect impacting the region".

The sign held by one of the demonstrators at Tahrir Square Saturday night in Cairo, pretty much sums it up for Mubarak it reads: "Game Over".

Ronald S.
|
California, USA
February 1, 2011

Ronald S. in California writes:

As a matter of policy, whenever there is a regime change, there needs to be a full accounting of individuals and groups who were detained as a result of exercising their ligitimate right to protest. Anything short of that would result in further instability and invites Muslim extremists to fill the vacuum.

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 1, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Mubarack misses the Memo.......

Egyptians: "Mubarak Out, Mubarak Leave"

Mubarak: " I will not run again in September..."

Ron
|
New York, USA
February 2, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Camels and horses, oh my!

The insanity of Mubarak's regime is apparent.

Camels, Horses, Machetes, Molotov Cocktails...The Cairo Museum is under assault...Mubarak would kill the culture...if he cannot keep power.

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