Secretary Clinton: "Reform Is Absolutely Critical to the Well-Being of Egypt"

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 28, 2011

White House Blog:President Obama on the Situation in Egypt -- "All Governments Must Maintain Power through Consent, Not Coercion"

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivered remarks on the unfolding events in Egypt on January 28, 2011.

Secretary Clinton said, "We continue to monitor the situation very closely. We are deeply concerned about the use of violence by Egyptian police and security forces against protestors, and we call on the Egyptian Government to do everything in its power to restrain the security forces. At the same time, protesters should also refrain from violence and express themselves peacefully.

"As we have repeatedly said, we support the universal human rights of the Egyptian people, including the right to freedom of expression, of association and of assembly. We urge the Egyptian authorities to allow peaceful protests and to reverse the unprecedented steps it has taken to cut off communications. These protests underscore that there are deep grievances within Egyptian society, and the Egyptian Government needs to understand that violence will not make these grievances go away.""As President Obama said yesterday, reform is absolutely critical to the well being of Egypt. Egypt has long been an important partner of the United States on a range of regional issues. As a partner, we strongly believe that the Egyptian Government needs to engage immediately with the Egyptian people in implementing needed economic, political, and social reforms. We continue to raise with the Egyptian Government, as we do with other governments in the region, the imperative for reform and greater openness and participation to provide a better future for all. We want to partner with the Egyptian people and their government to realize their aspirations to live in a democratic society that respects basic human rights.

"When I was recently in the region, I met with a wide range of civil society groups and I heard from them about ideas they have that would improve their countries. The people of the Middle East, like people everywhere, are seeking a chance to contribute and to have a role in the decisions that will shape their lives. As I said in Doha, leaders need to respond to these aspirations and to help build that better future for all. They need to view civil society as their partner, not as a threat."

You can read the Secretary's complete remarks here.

Comments

Comments

Zharkov
|
United States
January 28, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

The message from the State Dept. is lame and late. Egypt's government is finished.

The question Americans will want to know is, what was our government's role in the fall of Mubarak?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 28, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

What's "lame" is that the government of Egypt failed to heed the good advice given to it by the US gov. over the years to enact comprehensive reforms, and so now people have died forcing that government to do so.

I doubt that the American people will have any question that Mubarak brought this upon himself, whatever the outcome may turn out to be as folks support a people in their persuit of liberty and self-determination.

palgye
|
South Korea
January 28, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Egypt - Middle East, the new consumption and production, the capital of the country by building in the region a new economic community to create a willing little if you give up not state, and at least the Suez Canal, a simple formula for the assignment may give non-state think . Already, the response to the story, so I sucker There owing simply to exist in my memory like simular to the situation in Korea and, to speak rudely.

That in the past declared that Korea was on the 6-29. For rough -6.29 declared in 1987, shortly after 6 Struggle June 29, 1987, when ruling Democratic Justice Party presidential candidate, Roh Tae Woo, president and constitutional requirements that lead to the acceptance is issued a special declaration.

Through a direct presidential election in February 1988 a peaceful constitutional transfer of power
President of the revised election law to ensure fair competition through
(Kim), the slope of the opposition say the lottery and the City related to the release of the teachers
Respect for human dignity and basic human rights
Fostering freedom of speech
Autonomous local governments and education conducted
Ensure a healthy activity of political parties
Drastic social cleansing actions carried out in

- Was (strong recommendation of the U.S. Embassy?)

Egypt's situation is similar now I think. The current president and the government to hand over power to an opposition that, rather than maintaining the current government, the United States to maintain a constructive relationship with the Egyptian President has authority to transfer some of the people to declare that at the same time, the reform of the way the presidential election and democratic transition of government and opposition presidential candidate of the freedom of thought is important to ensure. And, in addition to women's political and social advancement for the elimination of formal and informal barriers to promotion at the same time you think you will get a significant response. However, local governments are too quick I think. Chest and the economic sector for economic growth means a unified dialogue will be needed.

Nevertheless, everyone knows the story, but The current President of the Egyptian protected, and in order to stabilize the unstable economic situation

Egypt's presidential candidacy method and the method of selecting the reforms and a peaceful and democratic transfer of power that promises dramatic declaration is required, women's political, social, and economic systems, the entry for the tangible and intangible barriers to abolish the policy, promising is thought to be carried out immediately. I have a feeling that the situation of Egyptian citizens to ensure the safety of aid it received his appointment to talk about the future situation, I think.

That is just me talking.

If asylum, the new government in order to unite the people, even Muslims have a lot of self-nationalist forces against the outside of the image to maintain pressure on the government in their hands to think the government should maintain. Or, but .....

Yet people claim that opposition to the people of Egypt, so to keep up with advanced ideas and policies we would not feel personally. Need time to think. Cairo, Egypt, and not all think. Is a personal opinion.

Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
January 29, 2011

Patrick W. in Maryland writes:

They are a young country and they need time to work on their political freedoms. I feel for the people there, that only what change to happen faster. Sometimes like in America, China and many other countries .Progress in areas like this, seem to take forever, especially for young people. I think, i understand what their going through. This country was the same not to long ago, ask anyone who's older. Egypt is just going through what we did, in our history of progress as a nation.

One day the people of Egypt will look back on this and see they are the same as us all. :)

Change takes time! Ask President Obama or Secretary Hillary Clinton !!!

See Ya, Guys and Women of DipNote. :)

Have a wonderful Weekend !

Hany D.
|
New York, USA
January 29, 2011

Hany D. in New York writes:

Please urge the Egyptian gov. to police the streets ne more time, the army is only secyring the vital buildings and critical locations in Cairo, but no body is protecting civilians in the outer neighbourhoods of Cairo, and suburbs. please push them to put police forces back on the streets, to protect the innocent people from robbers and criminal people that have nothing to do with the riot.

the police is pushing some of these criminals (thugs) onto the street to proof that this is not a people revolution, and appear to be the only solution for protection in the country and thet they are the only source of security, so the people won't even dare thinking about another solution or reform.

Please do something if you have any kind of power there.

Zharkov
|
United States
January 30, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

Why is the State Dept. message at this late stage of revolution lame and late?

1. Presidents Bush, Clinton, and Bush Jr. had over 20 years to help liberalize Egypt's government, Obama has had 2 years. So for at least 22 years, plus those billions of dollars we throw at Egypt, their government is still so unsatisfactory to their citizens that the citizens want to burn it down.

2. What stopped Mubarak from giving the citizens the right to vote for a new president?

3. Where did our money go for Egypt?

4. Why do we pay anything to Egypt when their citizens are so unhappy with their government?

5. When is the US government going to stop sending money and arms into the Middle East in order to buy favors?

Here's some advice for our own government:

“The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance of foreign lands should be curtailed lest the Republic become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance.” Marcus Tillius Cicero, 55 BC

Denise S.
|
Puerto Rico
January 30, 2011

Denise S. in Puerto Rico writes:

The US needs to understand that countries in the Middle East (Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, etc) have internet & FB. They see & read about freedom, education & want that for themselves. They travel, visit other countries. Some speak 5 & 6 languages. They want what the West has. So, the US has to change it's support for dictatorships & totalitarian regimes. It's the only way-- they have a right. They want CHANGE. We should practice what we preach: democracy, freedom & the pursuit of happiness.

I believe that if this situation is handled with empathy & we show this to the world, our status as a country will rise & it will be a great opportunity to help our national economy. I also believe that other countries will follow suit. This is only the beginning. A new policy needs to be studied & implemented. Let us look at the situation as a positive step!

Steve A.
|
Ohio, USA
January 30, 2011

Steve A. in Ohio writes:

Madame :

Many would suggest that the official response of the US Government should articulate a stronger support of the right of the Egyptian people to excercise peaceful demonstration and dissent.

Attorney Steve D A.

Ibrahim H.
|
New Jersey, USA
January 30, 2011

Ibrahim H. in New Jersey writes:

A question to President Obama: how many more egyptians have to die before we step-in and TELL the dictator Mubark that he has to leave? So far 100 egyptians have shed their blood on the streets of Egypt and the dictator is defaint and it seems that he is relying on the support of this adminstration.

To me the issue is clear: He WILL NOT GO UNLESS President Obama tells him to leave. Please do not support the dictator any more and stop the blood shed on the streets of Egypt.

President Obama and all the adminstration Please do not be afraid of a vacuum of power after Mubark. There will be no vacuum. The extremists WILL NOT ride the wave of the revolution in Egypt and take over. It will not happen. There are honest decent educated public figures in Egypt who could form a transitional government (if they were to be supported by the army and this adminstration) and they would bring about profound changes such as new constitution, respect of human rights, social justice, end of corruption and true democracy.

President Obama the extremists do not have any support among the masses in Egypt. The people in Egypt are peace-loving who just want the basic human rights everywhere the right to free speech, to have a job, to have a place to live, to get married, to live like a human being. These rights have been robbed from them for 30 years now. Under such conditions extremists would have NO support among the youth. In fact, the current conditions of the autocratic regime of Mubark are just the right conditions for breeding extremists simply because the youth see they have no future and hence they could be easily presuaded to support or even be part of extremists groups.

President Obama: Please come down on the right, support CHANGE, support EGYPT NOT the dictator Mubark

palgye
|
South Korea
January 31, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

The White House website talked up. but, Difficult negotiations difficult than negotiating for an appointment to be due to the difficulty for the faith. - If the establishment of an independent government, headed by the Arab self-determination of peoples attention is likely to be big. Worry about stupid, but ...

When I called on China to the Beijing Railway Station, all the lights turned much darker because I was driving to visit your factory are very bright, the rich countries of the developed countries or have an important meaning, but citizens of the workspace of how humans think it's important to have friendly . I guess people in developed countries rich countries.

Talk about the status and situation in Egypt that he is not, however, If the government continues to crackdown by the Egyptian and eventually to the development of Africa and the Middle East, political calculations, beyond the economic aspect alone can not be stressed, as huge consumer market and the production is thought to be developed. If they become financially independent region, the reduction of terrorism in the entire consumer market of about 3.4 to 4 percent more than would be achievable in the short term promotion is expected.

However, the suppression by force, this situation in Africa, Egypt, China likely to evolve as a big, tough hagieneun eventually close that nobody could possibly lead to countries that try to exaggerate. - China is to blame, not the people what they want in China, ordinary people what they want, while providing the control and did not lose respect, Egypt, the economy and democracy, is making time to give up. Personal greed - in order to have continuous control by the President Mubārak landmark declaration on democracy is thought to be released on Monday. And, if successful, a military crackdown, the U.S. will be a burden on the politically significant is expected.

People killed or injured in the protest by saying in the top finish.

PS: Miteoseo two people keep trying to kill people who work, plus eat food that had in mind putting the'm providing. MB, and frequently met ....? I often watch the news I would like to apply for asylum ...

Ashim C.
|
India
January 30, 2011

Ashim K.C. in India writes:

The outburst could not have happened without early warnings. Similar situations exist in many developing countries. World ledership must use foresight to anticipate and offer holistic peaceful solutions before situation turns violent. Cumultitive resources in terms of availability of goods and services and technology when used with sensitivity are sufficient to cater to all in an inclusive growth model, which would tacle stagnation in developed economies. Stagnation reflected in slow or no growth on a high base of all round development is ultimately a problem excessive capacities, which can be better shared rather than employed for competition. Competition serves well till saturation is not reached. In conditions of saturation, cooperation and sharing is better always.

roger
|
United States
January 30, 2011

Roger in USA writes:

To US President /Mr. Obama
Mubarak will go today or tomorrow this year or next year, Egypt and Egyptians will stay and will never forgive your disappointing speech and shameful situation of US regardless or the freedom blood, human rights & all western values been collapsing in whole Egypt, US complete alignment with the corrupted and dictatorship regime in Cairo is a real SHAME

Ron
|
New York, USA
January 30, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Conflict-of-Interest

US brand tear-gas symbolizes the conflict-of-interest between US/Egypt/Israel alliances and the values of democracy, freedom of assembly, and expression of the people. If we continue with the surrogate model, we will subborn the will of the people to establish their own state.

Miguel V.
|
Florida, USA
January 30, 2011

Miguel V. in Florida writes:

Dear Secretary Of State Clinton,

The people of Egypt has clearly stated their position in regards to the continued leadership under President Hosni Mubarak as completely unacceptable. His continued presence will destroy that beautiful country that Egypt is. The situation in Egypt is clearly out of control, volatile, and will only worsen so long as he tries to remain in power. You have already stated that the United States stands with the people of Egypt. Then let that stand mean more than just words, and urge president Mubarak to step down and save his country from unprecedented turmoil. He has already cost these peaceful people billions of dollars as the result of his actions, and it will only get worse. Reforms will not change what has already been well established over the past thirty years. Only a complete regime change with a new constitution under new leadership can accomplish that. Thirty years of deep corruption under president Mubarak's leadership has stolen the dreams of the Egyptian people and can never be replaced. Stand as you said behind the people of Egypt and urge him to resign.

John P.
|
Greece
January 30, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

When this happens I hate it. And this time it happens again.

Who told you guys that U.S. is acting like an old-fashioned Empire?

U.S.A. is a Democracy, certainly not a global Junta. U.S.A. offers help in terms of philosophy, ideas, education and financial aid, but cannot create the political, social, economical and cultural results for which natives must fight, decide and accomplish.

95% of the posts suggest that the situation in Egypt is a matter of bad American foreign policy for decades.

This is at least silly!

If this really happened, why didn’t you talk for 22something years, but you have the nerve to accuse America today?

Well, the classical assumption and anti-American propaganda tool: When everything is OK, U.S.A. has done nothing for this, but when the going gets tough, we can easily blame the “emperor”.

Sure! Except two things…

There is no “Emperor” and some of us don’t buy.

I also hate to make my friend Eric in NM feeling like a “copy and paste” (and so special), but what can I do, when he is SO RIGHT?

QUOTE: What's "lame" is that the government of Egypt failed to heed the good advice given to it by the US gov. over the years to enact comprehensive reforms, and so now people have died forcing that government to do so. END OF QUOTE.

And this is also applicable in many other areas in the planet.

So, before you blame U.S.A. just… think!

NICHOLAS
|
Georgia, USA
January 31, 2011

Nicholas in Georgia writes:

i wish to advise the state department to pick up an english version of the koran and read it the Us is still falling for this trap on all levels the Chinese using north korea and the rusians using Afghanistan, now its egypt they are bent on denouncing the preaching of democracy in egypt this tiem we do not have to remove a dictator the people themselves have and np help coming from america. it break myt heart no one is sitting and watching what is going on. just look at the way the dollar stores are stocked with chinese goods which sell at a dollar , last for less than a month and count the number of dollar stores in america. the chips that are put in all the cell phones computers, home phones tv, radios, car memory chips and as well as nasa computer what if those chips have an expiry date. please sit down and watch where we are going they supply us with video games , fish poultry, and Chinese restaurant has any one found out what the food contains at the restaurants. let forget about egypt and find out something is wrong with our country. how many chinese people do you see at a chinese restaurant? please get some one to pick the koran and read it the war between christains and moslems has been declared long ago in the koran. please get some one to read it please

Pam
|
West Virginia, USA
January 31, 2011

Pamela G. in West Virginia writes:

Very difficult time, hopefully level heads will prevail

Zharkov
|
United States
January 31, 2011

Zharkov in USA writes:

Most Americans, including those working in the State Dept., have little knowledge of how the Iranian people suffered under the Shah. It was the CIA who trained SAVAK and kept the Shah in power all those years.

Shortly after the Khomeini revolution, Dutch television broadcast pictures of a secret SAVAK torture center in Tehran. It was a basement with steel beds that had horizontal wire mesh at different levels. An Iranian explained that coal fires were started under the beds and prisoners were strapped onto the wire mesh and slowly lowered until they were barbequed. At the end of the program, he held up two severed, charred human hands that the torturers had left behind.

That film segment was shown on Dutch televison but never in the U.S. All us ordinary people living in the states continued to believe that Americans working in the embassy were representing America. We had no clue about what our government was doing in Iran.

Egypt is a similar situation from news reports. We "extraordinarily rendered" prisoners there for torture. You might imagine what Egyptian security services did to their own people, but reports include cattle prods, electric shock, mutilation of the most sensitive areas of the human body for the ones who lived through the ordeal.

We had at least 22 years to stop that behavior but we supported it with all kinds of military aid and money. We paid for that. We own that.

We are lucky the Egyptian people are not holding our embassy as hostages but if they get their hands on secret documents in the Egyptian government, their anger will turn on us.

John P.
|
Greece
January 31, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Zharkov in the U.S.A.

You are an undiscovered source of “shadow diplomacy” and Intel. I was sure that you were about to reach your favorite point: Blame CIA…

If the cable could talk…

For new readers, I feel to let you know that Z has created a magical explanation school for everything happening around the globe:

There is a problem in Pakistan, Iran, Belgium/Dutch &chocolates;, everywhere?
–CIA did it
There is a problem in Egypt?
–CIA did it
There is a problem in the Black Sea due to salt index raise?
-CIA did it
He can’t start his car in a cold morning?
-CIA did it
Too much traffic in San Diego “hi” to Mex?
-CIA did it
Who killed Elvis?
-CIA did it
Who build the pyramids?
CIA did it –with aliens from space

and now let’s get back to serious…

Z, my dear, you are really amusing. I really mean this. If we did not have to make an exchange of views in a civilized environment (DipNote), I’d really love to keep on listening to your hypothetical, conspiracy and fiction stories for hours. Humor is the best way to live longer. But when we talk in a social net, we have to be responsible.

Let me ask you something,

You write “We are lucky the Egyptian people are not holding our embassy as hostages but if they get their hands on secret documents in the Egyptian government, their anger will turn on us.”
1. Do you encourage extremist groups to attack the U.S. embassy (I do not mean all the Egyptians as you state it, I mean "terrorist groups"), because this is what you are suggesting. (I thought you love Americans) –thank God, SEALs are there!
2. Do you think that any presented document from any source (like wiki) is appreciated as a trusted source? I think that SD has provided the right answer already- during the “Swedish attempt”. As long as a document has left the “building”, IS NOT something to talk about. Who can trust the source, or what “happened” to the document? So who cares what anyone will attempt to present?

Anyway,

I wish Egyptians the Best! But, it’s up to them, whatever their decision is. I don't think that CIA knocked any door to tell them what to do.

JEFF L.
|
Texas, USA
February 1, 2011

Jeff L. in Texas writes:

Because most Americans and our government as well, want freedom and democracy for Egyptian people, I have this following suggestion.

Offer to the Egyptian people an "interim government" staffed by competent administrators from the United Nations. The U.N. could select these qualified individuals, all from different countries perhaps, to staff key parts of the Egyptian governemt for a limited time, say 6-12 months.

This could give the Egyptian citizens time to assemble qualified candidates for the Presidency and other positions of power. Any country going thru a crisis like this would have difficulty assembling candidates on very short notice- 6-12 months would give them reasonable time for key people to emerge and campaign ending with free elections. Real elections not rigged by an autocratic leader this time.

At the end of the interim period, newly elected leaders would replace the "hired administrators" and make a smooth transition. These interim administrators would have no power after that but only the thanks of the Egyptian people for helping their country make the transition from rule by Mubarak to one that the people choose freely.

The other benefit of this idea is that the USA would be "out of the picture" as it should be- this should reassure most cynics that the people are getting a fair deal, with no strings, no corruption, and a good chance to make a good choice for their leadership.

This could be compassionate aid to a country we have supported and one that has done right by us for many, many years.

John P.
|
Greece
February 1, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Jeff L. in Texas

I think that your suggestion is very sober, clever and “fair and square”.

That’s how we should think, especially during crisis. But, is it applicable?

I mean, do you think that this mosaic of people, religions etc. can accept a “foreign gov.” (that’s how they will call it and interpret it) right this difficult moment? Even if is just for 6-12 months.

I don’t know.

But I like your idea in a theoretical way.

At least it’s peaceful!

God bless them in their choices...

Zharkov
|
United States
February 1, 2011

Zharkov in the U.S.A. writes:

@ John in Greece - you really need to spend time at the library and do some reading about CIA history.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 1, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John P. in Greece,

Z conflates an issue because he can't properly identify why he's angry about a situation, where there is legitimate concern among Americans that the military aid provided to Egypt has been used to suppress demonstrators in the street who are excercising their their right to have a voice in their future.

Unfortunately his comparitive analysis lacks credibility for failing to connect the dots.

The US supports States, not governments. This is an important point in US foreign policy that is often overlooked and under-appreciated.

It means simply that the US works with governments to better the State through aid that may be humanitarian, economic, or military in nature to help the State provide for its citizens.

By the same token the relationship fostered is not just person to person within a government's structure, but also with the people of the State in support of their role as nationbuilders of their own nation.
Just as we may protect the soveregnity of States through treaty of mutual defense, IE NATO.

Which is why when a government is not acting in accordance with the policies laid out to be authorized to recieve aid, then it by our law must come under review.

As stated yesterday by Robert Gibbs (WH spokesman) It is not our place to determine who leads or who doesn't. That is for the people of Egypt to decide.

( paraphrasing accurately the meaning and intent)

Years ago we, along with the Brits prevented the nation of Iran from falling to a Soviet proxi (the Tudeh party) and helped them protect their soveregnity by training up what was designed to be a counter-intelligence org.

Any US involvement with training SAVAK ended in 1959, and had the US had a more "hands-on" approach that org. might not have devolved into an instrument of oppression of the Iranian people over the next 20 years.

I find it interesting that Khomeni after taking power in 79 kept SAVAK pretty much intact ( including personel) for his own purposes and continued the repression of Iranians for the last 31 years using the same methods and oppressive policies of the very government they removed by "revolution".

Z is comparing dog poo and loli-pops, saying in essence that they taste the same.

Sec Gates and Adm. Mullen have been active in their communications with the Egyptian military and that may have helped influence the Egyptian armed forces in their NOT using force on the people, and making that policy public.

Just as the US did not interfere with the people's will in Iran back in '79, nor will US policy try to determine for the Egyptian people what their future should look like.

I think though it is perfectly natural to encorage them not to make the same mistake as the Iranian people did by trusting extremists to determine their future.

The secretary's words above simply illustrate this point.

BTW, Thanks be to the people of Athens for hosting a sudden influx of Americans.

My question is whether the Iranian people will take courage and example from the Tunisian and Egyptian people and put 5 million on the streets of Tehran to force a new revolution in Iran?

One thing is for sure if they do and that is the Iranian government won't refrain from violence to maintain control over them.

Best regards,

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
February 1, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

@ Zharkov in the U.S.A.

If you think that you can find the history of CIA in a library, you’re naïve.
The real story is hidden in the hearts, souls and brains of these CIA heroes.

Library volumes, news stories, interviews and autobiographies of “so-called retired” agents that "write" the truth can only give you some dots, always not in the right order and for sure unable to be connected. Regularly full of egoistic prism in terms of how they perceived things. They can not offer a lead paragraph in a CIA history book and of course they can not teach you to think and interpret the scope and facts in their last paragraph.

I’ve told you before, “Failures are famous, Successes are not”!

The only way to understand the CIA history is to believe in!

(just for the history record)

.

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