Join a Discussion on Recent Trends in Anti-Semitism Around the World

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 25, 2011
Live: Conversations With America: Recent Trends in Anti-Semitism Around the World

Update: This event has been postponed and will be rescheduled. We'll provide you additional information as soon as it is available.

On Friday, January 28, 2011, Elisa Massimino, President and CEO of Human Rights First, will hold a conversation with Hannah Rosenthal, the Department of State's Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism, on the recent trends in anti-Semitism around the world. The discussion will be moderated by Mark Toner, Acting Deputy Spokesperson, Bureau of Public Affairs. The event will be streamed live on DipNote, the Department of State's official blog, at 3:15 p.m. (EST). You will have the opportunity to participate through the submission of questions, some of which will be selected for response during the live webcast. Submit your questions now in the comment section of this entry.

This is the ninth in the "Conversations with America" video series coordinated by the Bureau of Public Affairs, in which the State Department's senior leadership hosts monthly conversations live, online, with leaders of prominent non-governmental organizations. Discussion topics include foreign policy and global issues and provide a candid view of how leaders from civil society engage the Department on pressing foreign policy issues.

Comments

Comments

Niki
|
Nevada, USA
January 25, 2011

Niki in Nevada writes:

How much do you think the "us v. them" mentality with regards to Arab nations is perpetuated by the openly welcome and hospitable relationship with Israel? Do you see any way to combat the tensions without threats or military presence from the West?

Tony N.
|
California, USA
January 25, 2011

Tony N. in California writes:

Israel's occupation of the occupied terriroties plays a major role in Anti-Semitism around the globe. Why isn't Israel pressured to leave the occupied territories to lessen the trend of Anti-Semitism?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 25, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Elisa Massimino, Hannah Rosenthal, Cheryl Benton,

RE: trends and the path forward-

Ok then, so there was obviously a need percieved to create this position; "Department of State's Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism" , so how does doing so reflect the trends percieved by the US gov?

And will State or the Admin. appoint special envoys for every religious group or faith that is percierved to be the subject of anti- ( place religion of choice here)?

Bahais, Cristians, Buddhists, Hindu, Suni, Shiite, you name it, someone sopmewhere is against their right to live and worship in peace too.

Maybe (if I may be so bold to suggest) it would be helpful to appoint an "intolerance tzar" to combat intolerance in a coordinated manner among all faiths.

Heading up a "Dept. of Counter-Intolerance" perhaps?

I suppose if you did, that person would be properly designated as the "Ambassador of peace, love, happiness and all that other good stuff".

I'm totally serious about this. Somebody has to do it!

See, that person has to inspire the concept, "Life is good and then you become art."

If the "art of the possible" is to be a masterpiece.

Got any problem with this logic?

EJ

samar G.
|
Jordan
January 26, 2011

Samar G. in Jordan writes:

I think the situation in the Occupied territories is very critical, where I have noticed that Israel is not responding to stop building its settlements in the occupied territories, how can Israel be pressured to withdraw from the Occupied territories and announce Palestine as a free country and the Arab nations are not helping in this trend.

I think that Jerusalem is a great issue,, it is a holly place for all religions whihc is not witnessing any kind of peace nor settlements. How can the trend of anti-Semitism help in solving the tension in the occupied territories and Jerusalem.

Ron
|
New York, USA
January 26, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Anywhere on the Planet....

A New York Times article 1/27/11 reports a Dad of a 3rd grader in NYC, e-mailed a Holocaust Denial book to the PTA website. This, in one of the most sophisticated communities of Manhattan.

Hello?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 26, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Hello Ron,

Did you know there are still those out there that think the good 'ol USA faked the moon landings?

You had your Mickey Mouse fan club and I bet you the guy was trying to make a political statement because he was a certifiable member of the Aminutijob fan club, if not one of those 400 or so-called diplomats Iran has running around the UN violating their 12 mile travel limits.

At the very least Ron, if I were to go to NYC tommorrow by 8:00am, I guarrantee you I'd run into an idiot on the street there by noon.

(chuckle)

Been there, done that.

Let me just say that for all the considered and legitimate anger generated by Aminutijob's denials of Nazi attrocities of the past, there today seems to be a distinct lack of outrage at his government's atrocities committed upon the living.

The execution of journalists, political prisoners, street people, massive repression under their theocratic laws in communities of Bahais, Cristian and Jew, the denial of work and housing, harrasment and detention is every bit as vile as what the world declared "Never again!" in the UN over 60 years ago.

But genocide happens again and again while nations express official "concern", sit on their hands and do nothing to remove the perpetrators from power.

Hello? Would you like to talk hypocracy for all it's worth and debate the merits?

Me, I'm just sick of being witness to it. How 'bout you?

It's only when a dictator becomes an existential threat to the USA that we take the steps to remove him, and that's got to change.

It's time for every nation's government that has signed onto the universal declaration of human rights to do the right thing for once and not wait until it's too late.

That way no one has to debate whether they have WMD or not after the fact. Dictators are WMD in their own right through tyrany and oppression.

It may be the only way to create a better world and it's about time folks not only realized this, but did something useful about it.

How's that for a plan?

Take care,

EJ

Donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
January 27, 2011

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

Hey Eric its been awhile again...

The moon landings is a joke. You know why its a joke, because billions of dollars was allocated to spend on NASA. The truth is had we been to the moon in the first place, NASA would of kept returning to drill for water they claim is buried in ice on the surface. We had how many space shuttle missions and NOT one mission to the moon in those times? Is it possible the moon landings was a fake? Well I think we wanted to believe it happened, we saw it on tv and was mezmeorized. So Eric, how many times did we go on the moon again? LOL

Jennifer B.
|
France
January 27, 2011

Jennifer B. in France writes:

"I think best way for us in the United States to kind of kill the perception that we're not really interested in democracy is for us to come out very clearly and say that we support the right of Egyptians to protest, and we believe that their call for democracy is a legitimate call, and we support it for them, as we do for all peoples around the world." -Tarek Masoud from Harvard University on PBS News 26 January 2011

My question is, why does it look like we are more interested in stability than democracy? Secretary Clinton treats both sides of the Egyptian revolte like equals when one side is autocratic.

American, I have lived in France since 1999. With my French husband, I own a publishing house "www.editionscheap.fr". I have 5 French-American boys.

Thanks for your time.

Ron
|
New York, USA
January 27, 2011

Ron in New York writes:

Anti-semetism is not a delusional contruct.

Putting it in the "madness" category excuses discrimination.

A Chuckle does not change the facts.

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 27, 2011

Anna in Washington, DC writes:

Where is anti-semitism most on the rise? What are the causes?

David
|
United States
January 27, 2011

David in the U.S.A. writes:

When discussing anti-Semitism, one must confront two issues. One is the presumption that the land of Israel is being 'occupied' by the Jews when it really 'belongs' to the 'Palestinians'. I would point to the thousands of years of Jewish hi...story in the land of Israel on that point, and to the UN mandate that gave Israel to the Jews and Jordan to the Arabs. The second issue involves the 'abuse' being meted out by the 'terrible occupiers'. Look at Israel today. It is a pinnacle of technology, a democracy who treats resident Arabs and Christians with respect and who has transformed a barren landscape into a green paradise with plenty of food and a vibrant economy. Is that bad? The vast majority of land in the region remains Arab and Islamic and barren.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 27, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Ron,

Please don't take my Buddhist sense of humor the wrong way, there's a story behind that (chuckle), goes like this here;

First time in NYC, doing a lot of looking up...I wander on down by the UN and decide I'll try one of those infamous hot dogs folks sell out of a cart on the sidewalk.

Kosher as it turned out, and low and behold there was a Hasidic Jew and a Palestinian in traditional garb having a rather animated conversation about issues in their homeland right there waiting for lunch too.

I ordered lunch and turned to them and said, "Excuse me gentlemen, but I couldn't help overhearing your conversation. May I ask you both a question?"

To which they just stared at me like I was nuts for a moment (a typical tourist, I had no idea you don't talk to folks on the street in NYC lest they think you're nuts), and they both shrugged in unison and said, "Sure, why not?"

So I ask, " Why is it that the two of you can have such a civil discussion on the street in my country, but you can't seem to talk peace where you'all came from?"

The Jew turned to the Palestinian and said, "You want to answer that?""No" he said, "I think I'll let you do that."

So the Jew turns to me and says, pointing to the UN building across the street, "That's because we're on neutral territory.""Ah!" I said, " I see why that is now, but tell me please, when does your conflict come to our shores if it is not resolved at home?"

They couldn't answer that.

That was in '89 Ron, we got our answer on 9/11.

Kapish?

They didn't have an answer then and they still don't now, and apparently no one there is talking sense to each other even now, and that is madness.

There's no excuse is there? They were told long ago.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 27, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Donald,

They say a picture is worth a thousand words...

"www.technologyreview.com/blog/deltav/​23863"

If you read the article, you'll know there's been a lot of international confirmation from what we left there.

That should put you mind at rest since Mars is a better candidate for a permanent base someday in the future.

P.S. When you copy and paste the URL into your brouser, a square will appear before the numbers "23863" for some reason. Simply erase the square using backspace and hit the go button, then it will take you directly to the article and photo at that point.

That was so easy I should call "Mythbusters" and apply for a job (chuckle). Anytime Donald, glad to resolve this conundrum for you.

EJ

Paige G.
|
Australia
January 27, 2011

Paige G. in Australia writes:

Anti-semitism -

1. What is the US State Dept doing to stop the Israeli government from harming Palestinians...the Israeli government are the most effective breeder of anti-semitist feelin in the world...stop the Israeli governments flagrant breeches of international law and human rights, and you will change people's negative attitudes to Jewish people.

2. Why does the US government continue to provide the Israel government $30B in armaments etc when it constantly breeches the human rights and legal rights of Palestinians and their supporters....you want to stop anti-semitism...STOP FUNDING ISRAEL! ...and there is a chance the Jewish people will regain some credibility the world over....please comment on these statements.

To summarise using an old saying - 'you can't have your cake, and eat it too'...respect for others (in this case the Palestinians) breeds respect for self (in this case the Jews)

Moshe
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 27, 2011

Moshe in Washington, DC writes:

The first thing we need to do as Americans is realize that Jews are, arguably, experiencing their best treatment in modern history in the U.S. This was not something simply handed to the Jewish population. It was through a growth in the American democratic consciousness, which has brought us to a very open society in most of our largest cities. An example of this is the Civil Rights Movement that ushered in an era of equality for Jews as well as African Americans and other minority groups ( Note: I am not comparing the obvious disparity in suffering that African Americans faced, historically, and during this period of time to that of the Jewish population).

Our largest problem abroad is that this same shift in the democratic consciousness has not occurred in other countries. I will focus my attention on Europe as one cannot even begin to introduce into the equation the situation in the Middle East and North Africa. With the exception of Morocco and Turkey, I do not know of a country in the region in our current time that has embraced a Jewish population. One may point out the ~20,000 that live in Iran, but it is highly debatable about the level of equality that exists there. Perhaps someone else will comment on that in the blog.

One might ask why Anti-Semitism has decreased in the United States in comparison to the rest of the world? Jews, legally, are afforded equal rights and can now attend the same social engagements, live in the same areas, and work in the same locations, all things that were not present 60 years ago. Swastikas, bigotry, vandalism, and Anti-Semitic actions and rhetoric do still exist. Just ask the ADL. However, our way of handling it in a judicial form, and tolerance of it as a majority in a democratic society, has changed. This is also partially due to the US’s NGOs, non-profits, and legislative activism that allow Jews, and other minorities, to be engaged and equally entitled to our Constitutional rights through a democratic process.

This is where I draw the conversation back to our comparison to Europe. In many ways, the undertones that allowed the atrocities of the Holocaust still exist in many European countries. There are simply not as many Jew rights groups in Europe as there are in the US or Israel to fight for the abolishment of Anti-Semitism. Furthermore, countries not welcome to Jews in the past (e.g., Spain and Portugal) are not stepping up to the plate to take on Anti-Semitic sentiment, or open there doors to new Jewish immigrants. There have been in-roads in the former Axis countries, but this is simply because of their fundamental atrocious actions during WWII, not a growth in democratic consciousness that we have experienced in the US. Lastly, and I am not the first to say it, Anti-Semitic sentiment, in part, has been shifted to Anti-Israel sentiment, and the difficulty in separating out valid policy debate with clear cut Anti-Semitic rhetoric has left most of the world at odds. They simply don’t know how to handle it.

This brings me to my question: how do we use our knowledge of democratic principles, which have been successful in reducing Anti-Semitism in the US, to advocate in the behalf of the reduction of Anti-Semitism abroad?

Ingrid N.
|
Virginia, USA
January 27, 2011

Ingrid N. in Virginia writes:

Have you considered informing the public, via grassroots channels, such as internet, churches, synagogues, public radio and TV, on the contributions the State of Israel has provided to the world on the areas of medicine, agriculture, computer technology, arts,in its mere 62 years of existence?

Paige G.
|
Australia
January 27, 2011

Paige G. in Australia writes:

To make my point...look in the mirror Israel...ask yourself why we should condone your actions: from 'The Australian' newspaper Wed 5 Jan 2011: 'Mr Netanyahu said in November he would put the US request (to extend the freeze on settlement building) to a cabinet vote if incentives from Washington were put in writing, among them finance for advanced warplanes and a promise to veto any UN Security Council resolution against Israel's interests."....yeh, Israel is very committed to human rights...NOT! ...and the US govt expect the Jewish people to be respected for their support of Israels disgraceful conduct???? Give us a break. Where does Israel rate on the global peace index??? 144 out of 149 countries...love peace...and we will love you!

Helene
|
Virginia, USA
January 27, 2011

Helene in Virginia writes:

Since to many, being anti-Israel and being anti Semitic asre one and the same, we always need to be wary of the source of either. Grouping an entire group in a negative way because one might have a gripe with one person is wrong and against the God that many who are anti-Israel or anti-Semitic claim to believe in. Peace on earth is meant as a wish for one and for all, not just for some.

Susan C.
|
Florida, USA
January 27, 2011

Susan C. in Florida writes:

I am glad you are addressing this issue. I have posted several comments on this subject, on the DipNote blog, over the past two years. The rise of anti-Semitism is very disturbing, and it seems to be especially true in Europe. I believe it is not a valid statement to say that the Palestinian situation is the reason for the rise in anti-Semitism. The problem lies in the fact that anti-Semitism has never completely disappeared.

Therefore, my question is this: are there organizations/ programs available for young people that will counteract the myths and untruths that are often told, and repeated, about the Jewish people? We need to remember that Hitler and the Nazis used propaganda and the demonization of the Jews to justify their actions. We must not do this again, ever.

Moshe
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 27, 2011

Moshe in Washington, DC writes:

@ Paige G. I am glad you wrote. You illustrate my points on Anti-Semitism quite nicely, especially since you live abroad. I left Australia off of my list because it does have a thriving Jewish community, but, as we can see by your comments, there is fear for their well being as well.

Rationalizing Anti-Semitism because of broad assumptions on a given Prime Minister's Middle East policy is the epitome of the growth of Anti-Semitism abroad. If you read the latest articles about former Prime Minister Olmert's dialogue with Palestinian Prime Minster Mahmoud Abbas, and potential land swaps, you would see that efforts are continuously being made to reach a peaceful agreement. Are you pro-Jewish when you hear that? How about Ehud Barak, or the late Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, of the Camp David Accords? Were you pro-Jewish in 1978, 1994 and 1999 when peace was at their fingertips?

Historically, peace efforts have been greatly facilitated by the U.S. and the democratic principles of the U.S. You will also find that Jews pioneer the peace camps. Unfortunately, negotiations are highly complicated and Israel’s existence in the Middle East, even more. Israel's request for warplanes you may ask? Well, the unfortunate actions by Hizbullah, Hamas, and Iran necessitate the ability to defend oneself. All the actors I have mentioned are using rockets and not stones. Though, this is a policy issue and can be debated either one way or another, you are entitled to that. Furthermore, I, and most of the Jewish world, agree, human rights should not be violated.

I recommend, though, that you not take the politics of the day, and use them to justify Anti-Semitic actions, comments, or thoughts. This will simply leave you on the wrong side of the fence the day peace does come.

Shalom,
Moshe

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 27, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Moshe in DC,

Those are fair and reasoned comments, and much is simply self-evident, but what I think some folks mistake is that the sins of their fathers and grandfathers is reason enough to continue conflict today.

And whether that manifest as anti-semetic, or anti-Islam, the politically generated sentiments that nourish such mindset cannot be separated from the results.

You ask;

"One may point out the ~20,000 that live in Iran, but it is highly debatable about the level of equality that exists there. Perhaps someone else will comment on that in the blog."

I already did in my remarks previously in context with everyone else under the mullah's boot. If you seek a second opinion, go for it.

Today the Arab street is on the march in protest of disparity and dictatorship. In Iran, the regime has all but crushed hopes and dreams with brutality on the Persian street.

All this time since WW2 Israel has been building its own nation for the Jewish people, and hasn't found more than a moment's peace.

The US bombed cities into ruin to win that war, dropping two of the most destructive weapons ever unleashed to do it. Yet never have we suffered a single terrorist attack from either Germany or Japan after occupying the rubble for years.

I'll tell you why that is, and why Israel should take a great lesson from it here and now. Two beasic reasons, first that the vanquished realized their own leaders were to blame and second because America chose to lift those nations out of the rubble and engage in nation building then gave it back to them.

All at the same time we were building our own into a "more perfect union" and fighting a cold-war.

Well that's example we set to the world Moshe, and there's a lot of Iraqis and Afghans who have thanked us for helping them rebuild their's.

I'm not prejudiced to think that Israelis and Palestinians arn't of themselves being just as able nations of nation-builders as we are. My question is are they ready to be, and that's only if they want to bad enough. Or do they simply think misery is their only company to keep?

Best,

EJ

John P.
|
Greece
January 28, 2011

John P. in Greece writes:

To Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism is much bigger and deeper, than a Middle East perspective analysis can provide.

Certainly it can not be analyzed in just a narrow, regional Israel-Palestinian explanation path. Even if Israel and Palestinians could magically reach a peace and collaboration point (hypothetically right now), this would not offer a global solution to fight Anti-Semitism worldwide. Of course peace and good neighboring in the area would be a great step.

So, I’d focus on two very interesting perspectives Eric in NM and Susan in FL offered us through their posts, each one from her/his point of view. However, I think that their views are very constructive! Moreover, if you proceed with a comparative thinking, we can easily reach a next level of making our world better.

Let me underline some words:

“The problem lies in the fact that anti-Semitism has never completely disappeared.”

“Are there organizations/ programs available for young people that will counteract the myths and untruths that are often told, and repeated, about the Jewish people?”

“will State or the Admin. appoint special envoys for every religious group or faith that is perceived to be the subject of anti- ( place religion of choice here)?”

“it would be helpful to appoint an "intolerance tzar" to combat intolerance in a coordinated manner among all faiths.”

"Ambassador of peace, love, happiness and all that other good stuff.”

[Well guys, I am a Christian Orthodox, living in a country where Anti-Semitic propaganda is very strong and without a reason, I’d say. Hopefully this anti-propaganda never touched me – don’t ask me why, I don’t know - the same way anti-American propaganda never reached me. So, I think that I remained a sober thinker, who can sleep at nights without having conspiracy and unjustified nightmares in order to describe the world through religion myths and ego-explanations.

I am neither a Jew, nor a spy, certainly not a guy that has to adopt, or promote a pro-Semitic thesis, but I think that I have to offer another small point to this issue. Especially, if I want to be fair with my thinking ability, which may be wrong. Who knows?

In many cases, Anti-Semitism has to do with success. Although Jews are fewer than other religions, they are extremely successful in Commerce, Science, Arts etc. This creates “enemies” –due to lack of power and money- and enrich some opportunist guys full of complex to create Anti-Semitic, or Anti-Religion (place religion of choice here) propaganda in order to stay near the “honey”.]

So,

"Life is good and then you become art."
If the "art of the possible" is to be a masterpiece.

Best regards to all readers. Nice posts!

Alia A.
|
Oman
January 28, 2011

Alia N. in Oman writes:

I wish Human Right can focus on "racism" or "xenophobia" in general rather than categorizing the form of racism and talk about anti-Semitism, Islamo-phobia...

the level of acceptance of all religion without exception has to be equal all over the world.

It is time to stop thinking that some are victims while others are terrorists.

Devora
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 28, 2011

Devora in Washington, DC writes:

My question is how the State Department distinguishes between anti-Semetic rhetoric and anti-Israel rhetoric. These aren't necessarily the same, but often are. What role does the long history of anti-Israel remarks from the Arab world (starting decades ago) play, when the State Department is guaguing the "situation on the ground"? And to what extent are anti-Israel & anti-Semetic voices from the Arab world not taken seriously because they're the one "legitimate" form of expression allowed in these dictatorships? (In other words, you cannot criticize your own govt, but you can deflect anger against Israel). I would like to hear these questions addressed. THank you.

Roger T.
|
Florida, USA
January 28, 2011

Roger T. in Florida writes:

We tend to believe that Anti-Semitism is strongest in the Middle Eastern nations, but the truth is that by closing our eyes to Anti-Semitism around the world we are supporting an age old problem. My questions; how do we change people's minds and educate them to the truth? What programs are available to do this, here and abroad?

EVANG. D.
|
Nigeria
January 28, 2011

Joshua D. in Nigeria writes:

DO YOU NOT THINK THAT ANTISEMITISM IS A WAY OF TELLING THE JEWS THAT THEY ARE NOT ACCEPTED AS A PEOPLE OR SHOULD BE DEPRIVED THE RIGHT OF EXISTENCE AS A SOVEREIGN NATION.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 28, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

For Immediate Release January 27, 2011

Statement by the President on International Holocaust Remembrance Day

"I join people here at home, in Israel, and around the world in commemorating International Holocaust Remembrance Day, as we mark one of the darkest, most destructive periods in human history.

To remember is a choice, and today we remember the innocent victims of the Nazis’ murderous hate – six million Jews and millions of other people. We are reminded to remain ever-vigilant against the possibility of genocide, and to ensure that ‘Never Again’ is not just a phrase but a principled cause. And we resolve to stand up against prejudice, stereotyping, and violence – including the scourge of anti-Semitism – around the globe.

At the same time, we remember the ordinary people who courageously and heroically expressed the very best of the human capacity for compassion and justice by risking their lives to save their fellow human beings during the Holocaust. They demonstrated that in the midst of evil, human beings can perform remarkable acts of decency and dignity.

Finally, on Holocaust Remembrance Day, we remember the survivors and the profound faith and courage they have embodied to build lives of purpose and meaning. In doing so, they are defying those who tried to kill them, and teaching us that love and life can vanquish hate and death. Let us honor them, and those we lost, by building a more peaceful, just and tolerant world."

---From Whitehouse.gov---

John in Greece,

Re:

"Maybe (if I may be so bold to suggest) it would be helpful to appoint an "intolerance tzar" to combat intolerance in a coordinated manner among all faiths.

Heading up a "Dept. of Counter-Intolerance" perhaps?

I suppose if you did, that person would be properly designated as the "Ambassador of peace, love, happiness and all that other good stuff".

I'm totally serious about this. Somebody has to do it!

See, that person has to inspire the concept, "Life is good and then you become art."

If the "art of the possible" is to be a masterpiece."

---

Like a good "spy", I tend to take a non-linear approach, creeping analysis around a conundrum, and allow it to enter the subject's mind like moss growing on old socks, to which there comes an sudden moment of realization in the subject of targeting..."Oh My... I'm wearing his thought!"

(chuckle)

Little did the President know he was also speaking for me.

Constantine I.
|
New York, USA
April 25, 2011

Constantine I. in New York writes:

Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism Hannah Rosenthal said in Indiana on April 2:

"And there is Holocaust relativism – where government agencies, museums, academic “research” and the like are grouping the lessons of the Holocaust with other repressive regimes, especially in the FSU and South America. While no one wants to get into dueling victimhoods – to combine these bad chapters of history is not only historically dishonest, it also misses opportunities to learn the different lessons. Never before or since the Holocaust has a country put its creative culture together to build effective and efficient killing factories. And while people truly suffered during the Dirty War or under Soviet rule, the Holocaust must be studied for what it was: The Holocaust teaches what is possible."

It implies that murder of 6 MLN people only because they were Jews, is a very Bad thing.

But murder of over 40 to 50 MLN people in Soviet Russia only because of their "NON-PROLETARIAT" origin or because they didn't like BOLSHEVISM (20 MLN of WWII victims are not included here) is "a dishonest comparison."

Nice position of the Department of State's Special Envoy! Very remarkable position!

Just like all lovers of Bolshevism are constantly doing.

.

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