Photo of the Week: President Obama Welcomes President Hu of China

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 22, 2011
President Obama and President Hu Walk Along the Colonnade of the White House

This week's photograph, taken by official White House photographer Pete Souza, captures President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao of the People's Republic of China walking alongside the Colonnade of the White House. President Obama hosted President Hu in Washington, DC for an official State Visit from January 18 to 21. Over the course of the visit, the leaders of the world's two largest economies discussed a wide range of bilateral, regional, and global issues, including cooperation in commerce, science and technology, regional stability and security in East Asia, and moving forward with a formal dialogue on human rights.

On January 19, the President, the Vice President, the First Lady, Dr. Biden, and Secretary Clinton welcomed President Hu to the White House South Lawn. After the Presidents' bilateral meeting, the counterparts held a press conference to discuss U.S.-China relations.

In the afternoon, Secretary Clinton, Vice President Biden, and Dr. Jill Biden co-hosted a luncheon in honor of Chinese President Hu Jintao at the Department of State. In an interview with CBS, Secretary Clinton said that President Hu's visit to Washington represents “the continuation of two years of the Obama Administration's efforts to build a positive, cooperative and comprehensive relationship with China. And we think it is one of the most consequential relationships for the future of our country and the future."

Later, Secretary Clinton, Vice President Biden, and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack showed President Hu a model of the proposed China Garden in the National Arboretum. In addition, Secretary Clinton and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi signed a memorandum of understanding establishing the U.S.-China Governors Forum.

First Lady Michelle Obama hosted an event at Howard University focusing on study abroad and the "100,000 Strong Initiative," which seeks to increase the number of American students studying in China and prepare the next generation of American experts on China who will be charged with managing the growing political, economic, and cultural ties between the United States and China.

After Mrs. Obama delivered remarks, Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs Ann Stock led a panel discussion with students who studied in China, including State Department exchange program alumni. You can watch the video here.

In the evening, President Obama and the First Lady hosted a dinner in honor of President Hu and the Chinese delegation. During an exchange of toasts, President Obama said, “…to our people, the citizens of the People's Republic of China and the United States of America. May they grow together in friendship. May they prosper together in peace. And may they realize their dream of the future for themselves, for their children, and for their grandchildren."

You can view more photographs from President Hu's visit here on www.whitehouse.gov.

Comments

Comments

palgye
|
South Korea
January 24, 2011

Palgye in South Korea writes:

talks on Iran's nuclear issue, and think no shame to end. If the ability to keep talking, and I want to .... If possible ... "http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/europe/01/22/turkey.iran.nuclear.talks..."

Expect to be easily resolved, but I came up with the expectation that I think China is the result. Is there another way?

DrG
|
West Virginia, USA
January 24, 2011

Dr. G in West Virginia writes:

Maybe public schools should start offering Chinese for required foreign language instead of Spanish and French.

Pam
|
West Virginia, USA
January 24, 2011

Pam in West Virginia writes:

We must continue to push China for equal rights and a better dollar value.

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 25, 2011

Anna in Washington, DC writes:

@ Pam in W. VA. -- I could not agree with you more. We have sold out America's working class and manufacturers, human rights activists in China, religious people in China, the people of Taiwan and Hong Kong for cheap, sometimes toxic, products made in China. It makes me sad.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 25, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Anna in DC,

Who is "We"?

RE:

"We have sold out America's working class and manufacturers, human rights activists...."

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 26, 2011

Anna in Washington, DC writes:

Hi Eric --

"We"? "We" includes major companies, U.S. politicians and government officials, and yes, the American voter/ consumer.

It seems to me that we -- we, being America -- and China need each other right now, and both of us will have to make the best of it. I'm just afraid we did a disservice to many people -- America's working class, China's human rights activists, and others -- along the way.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 26, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Anna,

I find that I must divorce myself from the notion of "we" in this case, having had no credit card to get beyon my ability to repay, nor a home to get upside down upon with multiple mortgages.

Then there's the volunteer effort of long-standing in support of human rights, in helping opposition to tyrany have a voice in the matter.

In addition Anna, I think you will find that the majority of the Diplomatic Corps would dissagree with your assesment as they implement this nation's foreign policy, trade relations, and diplomacy in support of human freedom and achievement on every level.

How then have "we" done a diservice to the world or ourselves?

This is not to imply that the process has been perfected and no room for improvement exists.

There's this thing called a QDDR that State undertook to put all this under a microscope.

But as your dissatisfaction has been duly noted, you may find my assesment of Hu's visit noteworthy in getting at solutions.

"http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entry/obama_hu_press_conference#Co..."

Best,

EJ

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
January 27, 2011

Anna in Washington, DC writes:

Hi Eric --

You are fortunate -- or smart -- not to be burdened with credit card debt or a mortgage you can't afford. I wish more Americans were in that boat.

I am sure many diplomats do put human rights first, but money always seems to trump other issues.

Thank you for sharing President Hu's press conference with me. I missed it and am encouraged to read that he and President Obama addressed human rights.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
January 27, 2011

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Anna,

I've never had enough money to trump happiness, nor credit to borrow on same, nor a down payment on the American dream for that matter.

But as long as I can keep the phone bill paid and the internet up and running, I can't say as I'm too broke to pay attention. Just almost.

Fortunate is relative, you wouldn't by any chance know this week's winning powerball numbers would you?

(chuckle)

P.S. Just for the record my assesment was in the comment section. You're most welcome in any case.

.

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