Secretary Clinton Welcomes Release of Aung San Suu Kyi

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
November 13, 2010
Aung San Suu Kyi Appears After Release From House Arrest

Today, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joined people around the world in welcoming the release of Burmese democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest. Secretary Clinton issued a statement, saying:

"...Aung San Suu Kyi has endured enormous personal sacrifice in her peaceful struggle to bring democracy and human rights to Burma, including unjustified detention for most of the past twenty years. The Burmese regime has repeatedly rejected her offers to engage in dialogue and work together, trying instead to silence and isolate her. Through it all, Aung San Suu Kyi's commitment to the Burmese people has not wavered.

"The United States calls on Burma's leaders to ensure that Aung San Suu Kyi's release is unconditional so that she may travel, associate with her fellow citizens, express her views, and participate in political activities without restriction. They should also immediately and unconditionally release all of Burma's 2,100 political prisoners.

"We urge Burma's leaders to break from their repressive policies and begin an inclusive dialogue with Aung San Suu Kyi and other democratic and ethnic leaders towards national reconciliation and a more peaceful, prosperous, and democratic future."

Comments

Comments

Mohammad N.
November 13, 2010

Amer N. writes:

I love this statement of Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton.Democracy and Human Rights! This is good. This is best. So I love Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. And my source of inspiration. I dont have the words how to appreciate this Statement. Amer

palgye
|
South Korea
November 14, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

I want to say, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

"THANK YOU", "VERY MUCH"

and, yes, still "Burma".

P.S. enough money, I want to visit to Burma.

Thank You.

palgye
|
South Korea
November 14, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

The avarice happens repeatedly in Burma.

Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
November 15, 2010

Patrick W. in Maryland writes:

It's great to hear that Aung San Suu Kyi, was released from her house arrest. :)

Hopefully this means the Burmese's Government is changing it's policy on Freedom Of Speech. If they are, that would be a good start on improving our relationship with them.

Anyways, it's good news that She's free. :)

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 17, 2010

Anna in Washington DC writes:

Aung San Suu Kyi is an inspiration. I hope the best comes from her release, both for her and the people of Burma.

Kathy
|
China
November 23, 2010

Kathy in China writes:

@Secretary Cliton

Why does the Aung San Suu Kyi so important in the stage of politics in the world?

and Does she can bring the peace to Burma even the whole world?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
November 24, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Kathy in China,

Fair question, and I think you can find the answer in the fact that the people of Burma think she's important and can bring a better future than the dictators in power there now.

Why does the US support her freedom and why should you as well?

Well ask yourself how you would feel under "house arrest" for as long as that 20 years, unable to even see your son for the last decade, and understand that there is a level of compassion in US policy that should be taken into account.

If you want a history lesson as to how long that compassion has been a factor in policy then google "Chennault's Flying Tigers" and you'll get a sense of what China owes the US for being what you are today as a great nation.

Then you may also understand why dictators like Kim-so-ill can no longer be tolerated on the world stage.

By anyone, including China.

Be well,

EJ

Kathy
|
China
November 25, 2010

Kathy in China writes:

@Eric in New Mexico,

I think that the influence of Aung San Suu Kyi is a mediate factor in Burma where is under the dictators in power now.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
November 25, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

True enough I think mediation is the way, but it also makes one think what the dictators thought they had to be afraid of in the first place to lock her up for so long...

Change I suppose...maybe now they've concluded that's as inevitable as the sun rise and surrendered to the notion that it's ok to change...if the people will it to be.

One might hope.

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