The Art of Diplomacy: "Brewster's Creek" on Display at Spaso House in Moscow

Posted by Kristen Hickman
October 2, 2010
Detail of the Painting Brewsters Creek on Display in Moscow

About the Author: Kristen Hickman serves as Public Affairs Officer for the Office of ART in EMBASSIES.

William James Glackens offers a peaceful escape from the intensity of metropolitan living in his work Brewster's Creek currently on view as part of the ART in EMBASSIES exhibition at Spaso House, Moscow. Past tensions over arms control and arms reduction seem far removed from this quiet, secluded scene that depicts a life free of worry and fear. A native of Philadelphia, Glackens worked as an illustrator for newspapers and magazines for many years. In his free time, he studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He traveled to France a number of times and was influenced largely by the works of Renoir.

Later, he moved to New York City where he became associated with the Ashcan School, a group of eight artists who exhibited their works without pre-approval by juries of the existing art establishment. The Eight, as they were called, became key figures in the realist movement and often focused their work on urban scenes. Yet, Brewster's Creek evokes the comfort of a rural scene and beckons a return to the pleasures of a simple life. Whether in Moscow or Washington -- or any number of cities around the world -- getting away from the day-to-day routine sometimes requires just a few minutes from an artist's point of view.

Comments

Comments

Laurie M.
|
Massachusetts, USA
October 3, 2010

Laurie N.M. in Massachusetts writes:

So lovely to see this serene work of art shared in beautiful Spaso House.

noralalemmohammed
|
Sudan
October 3, 2010

Noralalem M. in Sudan writes:

hi i want know if can halp me to tarvel to usa

DipNote Bloggers reply: Please see http://travel.state.gov.

Oystercracker
|
United States
October 3, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Very nice. Looks like some New England town. I'd like to see Aghani or Yemeni children's art. That would be a good way to support a child's education or build a village school on the sale of children's art to the New York art world.

Ron
|
New York, USA
October 4, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Back to the Future....

USIA cultural sharing programs were very effective in bridging the gaps between regions, countries, and ideologies. We need to go beyond borders with art, literature,food, music hath charm....

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