Modern Slavery: From Victim to Survivor

Posted by Luis CdeBaca
August 25, 2010
Child Laborers at Police Station After Factory Raid in New Delhi

About the Author: Ambassador Luis CdeBaca leads the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the U.S. Department of State.

Every day, vulnerable populations are exploited in every country in the world, including the United States and one of the most endangered groups of people is children. From the young girl being turned out in a truck stop or a brothel; to the boy on the streets caught up in a begging or prostitution ring; to the kids working in the fields; to the child domestic servant who never gets to leave the house and lives in the fear of the knock on the door at night -- children in the United States and around the world are vulnerable to exploitation and suffer greatly from the heinous crime of human trafficking.

On Monday, August 23, I was fortunate to meet with some of the very professionals, including victim service providers and district attorneys, who work each and every day to keep kids in America safe from all forms of exploitation. Check out the speech here. This was an important day to reflect on activities to protect the most vulnerable as August 23 is the United Nations' International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition. Click here to read Ambassador Susan Rice's statement.

As we look to "lead by example" in the fight against modern slavery on the global stage, the United States is also working very hard here at home to protect victims, prevent the crime in the first place, and prosecute the traffickers who dare to hold others in bondage. Just in the last week, the State of Illinois implemented a stronger law to prosecute pimps and give children a safe haven, while law enforcement spearheaded a wide swath of arrests in Oregon, Chicago, and Houston.

Through its "whole of government" approach, the Obama Administration is committed to combating all forms of modern slavery. We are working to develop and support promising practices that can hasten the journey from victim to survivor. Experience has shown that when there is support, there is success.

Go to www.state.gov/g/tip to find out ways in which you can join us on that journey to freedom. Learn more via Twitter and Facebook.

Comments

Comments

Jack H.
|
Oklahoma, USA
August 25, 2010

Jack H. in Oklahoma writes:

The United States has never played as active a role in policing the world since WW2 as many of us would like to have seen up to now. Any increase in participation is welcomed by most Americans, especially when it directly effects the quality of aliens enterring our country.

Patrick W.
|
Maryland, USA
August 25, 2010

Patrick W. in Maryland writes:

Look we all are slaves too, the 5% of the people in the world that have all the Money.

Thats reality and if we what too, Change it. We need too, take our world back from them.

We all need too, kick some greedy rich Butt.

This is our world ! We out number them, lets kick their Butts an take our world back for the good of the real people. That goes for Americans too. Sounds Good Too,all of us Real modern slaves.

Fight Back, American's , we are the modern slaves too. And if you think your not,your and idiot .

I like it, sounds like real modern America.:)

Reality Sucks, but it's the truth..:)

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 25, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

The U.S. is a willing partner in slavery by allowing multinational banks to launder drug profits. Drugs, child prostitution, human slavery often follow along in tandem with drug routes. Why would you allow these banks to operate with impunity? It's unconscionable and un-American.

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 25, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

There are numerous illegal aliens managing and being exploited in sex parlors nationwide and yet, they are only given a small fine and allowed to continue operating. If America believes in its own rhetoric then this deplorable usury should be stopped and the operators deported. It boggles the mind that foreigners are given such free reign to commit acts of terror in our nation. Why aren't they marginalised and stopped like the Taliban?

Nike C.
|
China
August 25, 2010

N. in China writes:

Good, smart post. I've done this as well and I have to see it's great in terms of creating brand and ultimately, awareness.

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 26, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

American children sex trafficked on Craiglist.
Why are they allowed to continue operating? Why aren't they shut down?

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 26, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Telling the soldiers who comitted these atrocities that the world will no longer tolerate this deplorable, heinous disregard of women, then sending a hit squad after every last one them will send a clear message to anyone in the world that the U.S. stands up for women and children and will not tolerate any type of abuse against them. like Putin said, "We know who you are, we know what you did!" That message would send deep chills down anyone's back.

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 26, 2010

O.C. in U.S.A. writes:

This is why early childhood programs are so vitally important in developing nations and money should be spent in prevention early in a child's life. When you treat children like national treasures and teach their parents how to treasure their own children, they will stand up to enemies trying to destroy their communities.

I understand that early childhood development is considered to be low priority against, disease, malnutrition and clean water but it shouldn't be. It should be wraparound care. As you educate young children parents will want this education to continue for their children through teenhood and beyond. E

stablishing an all purpose childhood center that includes medical, dental and teaches water purification, building and agriculture is the basis of a community. As people come to rely on the services on offer they will want to expand and improve upon these services. A center that revolves around the well being of village children positively affects the entire community. Strong communities=Strong families=Strong nations. This aspect should not be overlooked in foreign policy plan implementation.

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 26, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Privatized Globalization......

Sex-Trafficking has been woven into the fabric of global commerce. Organized crime and corrupt governments are the weavers.

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 27, 2010

O.C. in U.S.A. writes:

Thank You Ron from New York. A man who speaks the truth. How is America helping not adding to the world's misery? We don't have to be so evil to make some money and help others along the way. It's called capitalism with a conscience, if that concept even exists.

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 28, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

No Trades?...Traffick!

Whether sex,arms, drugs, organ, flora or fauna..humans are trafficking because there are few legitimate means of employment....the lack of income opportunities force humans to become commodities.

OysterCracker
|
United States
August 28, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Ron,
That may be true but its even truer that big governments like America are involved in the drug trade through banking, markets, delivery routes etc. It is no small feat to organize and deliver and launder profits of huge quantities of drugs and it's no small coincidence that mostly recent wars were in drug trade areas like Vietnam, Afghanistan, Panama, Serbia. It kills me when other Dipnote bloggers infer that you're un-American when you talk about these issues. Drugs ruin societies. Children deserve a decent world to live in not one embroiled in strife to make a profit.

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 31, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Global Asset Forfeiture....take the oxygen out of the beast....freeze and seize the flow of global crime and corruption cash....regardless of where it leads....Be amazed at the complexities of crimes against humanity and the players who are financing and profitting from them. Slavery is one symptom of a mega-disease.

Emlaskow
|
Maryland, USA
October 5, 2010

Emlaskow in Maryland writes:

Domestic Mionr Sex Trafficking is a form of slavery that has not recieved enough attention. This is not longer just a local issue: It is now a federal issue. More than 150,000 minors are lured into prostitution each year, most of which are runnaway adolescents. In addition, the average age of first exploitations is 12-13 years of age.

Several measures need to be taken. First, there need to be more facilities available for runaway teens. Secondly, international human trafficking recieves lots of funding, while funding for its occurence within our own borders is limited. We need to recognize that offedners come from within a community, which requires more collaboration over jurisdictional lines. Finally, we also need to remove the stigma of victims being treated as criminals. Buyers are the people law enforcement should focus most on.

Oystercracker
|
United States
October 5, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Lots of sex trafficking going on in Hawaii. Why do they get a free pass? Why are they allowed to sex traffic with impunity? Lots of corruption down dat way bra'.
No criminal should be allowed on an airplane to Hawaii. The police don't don't have the ability or resources or they are too corrupt to fight against it. Hawaii has many problems. Don't send more.

Oystercracker
|
United States
October 5, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Ask the FBI to check out Hulie'e palace, Alii Drive, Kona Big Island. Saw a van full of scantily dressed women come out of there. Maybe that's the headquarters.

.

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