How Best Can the U.S. Support Democracy in Iraq During This Time of Transition?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
August 20, 2010
A Rainbow Over Baghdad

August 31 marks a critical milestone in Iraq, as the U.S. combat mission comes to an end. The end of combat operations in Iraq and the transition to civilian-led efforts fulfills President Obama's commitment to responsibly end the war.

Earlier this week, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Chris Hill said, "I think the U.S. relationship with Iraq is in a position...to grow and to be self-sustaining and to be long-term."How best can the U.S. support democracy in Iraq during this time of transition?

Comments

Comments

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 30, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@U.S. Department of State and T.J. in the U.K.

The U.S. administration is not a "global policing force" and we are not the "rulers of the world.

I adamantly disagree with you and with your analysis on Iraq and with respect to Iran. Who are you Mr. T.J. to criticize someone else's culture in such a degrading manner? It is up to the people of Iraq to decide what would be in there best interests as far as forming a government, not a "neoconservative" in Washington D.C., who's only interest is to promote their "brand of governance and economic model".

The United States, really needs to get out of the business of going into Islamic countries, by force and with trying to "model theses societies" into a Western like democracy-regardless of consequences, this strategy and policy is "counterproductive". We are risking, creating a "unipolar world" and our military engagement and intervention in multiple countries today has generated a "great deal of animosity" towards the United States.

My advice would be to promote and have the Iraqi's seek to establish a "Sunnah" majority for the new (yet to be established) Iraqi Parliament, this would prove to enhance "long term stability" in Iraq.

Mr. T.J., I have had many discussions with my graduate classmates, engage in group presentations, attended a briefing at Carnegie Institute on "the dynamics of the tribal laws -- with respect to Yemen" and interacted with my Professor's in academia, who are the leading experts on "International Peace and Conflict Studies" and I thank God that many scholar's are in line with my philosophical principles.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 30, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Reminds me of a "artist" I once knew, the way you create fantasy Joeseph..., but hey if we "ruled the world", nations could count on us sharing the pie,since we keep giving nations back to the owners, and as long as we keep being the leading humanitarian response mechanism of the world-feeding so many, contributing 23% of all the peacekeeping funding in the UN (out of 191 member states) then I guess a unipolar effort as world's cop is underway to save lives and you have a problem with the way the US is going about it?, find another sponsor,...then get back to us.

Quit with the "group-think".

(chuckle)

EJ

T.J
|
United Kingdom
August 30, 2010

T.J. in the United Kingdom writes:

-Joseph,

I adamantly disagree with you and with your analysis on Iraq and with respect to Iran. Who are you Mr. T.J. to criticize someone else's culture in such a degrading manner? It is up to the people of Iraq to decide what would be in there best interests as far as forming a government, not a "neoconservative" in Washington D.C., who's only interest is to promote their "brand of governance and economic model".

O.K I need to START from the basics not forgetting some facts.

Who am I? I am an Iranian with a long memory of living under the Shah's regime and under the Mullah's regime. I have had many dealings and discussions with Iraqis and Kurds as I see the lock and Key to their problems somehow is not easily in their reach. Without denial, OTHER forces - both visible and invisible are active in the post Saddam era and thus stopping the unification and independant an independent Iraq.

By mentioning the BURP, I was not mocking the Arab culture. I was basically trying to portray the vast differeces of the cultures. As far as an Arab is concerened because "we "who do not burp after a meal, are RUDE. I hope you get it with this simple expansion.

UNIPOLAR? There is ONLY one Earth for all of us. Please tell me could you live under Sharia Law if it was implemented in the US from tomorrow?
Democracies are NOT hostile towards each other. This is a fact. There is only one way forward. Human Rights, DOES matter. Therefore I condemn ALL dictatorships, whether they have cultural or religious reasons to exist. The US IS involved in this struggle already. We can not turn the clock back.
A great thinker once said; What separates people, is religion and borders.

If Yemeni people enjoy driving modern Cars and not Carts, then they have cherished the results of progress. Tribal laws belong to Stone Age. We need to show them how to implement our ways to reduce and remove this large gap that exists between us for the sake OUR future together, otherwise some of us will have to inhabit another Planet and live separate lives.

I am sorry, to me it does not matter how many seminars or discussions YOU have had. You have no first hand experiece of this matter. No browny points for you. Sorry.

Why do you think I have made U.K my home? It was not for their Women I assure you.

T.J
|
United Kingdom
August 30, 2010

T.J. in the United Kingdom writes:

- Joseph 2;

My advice would be to promote and have the Iraqi's seek to establish a "Sunnah" majority for the new (yet to be established) Iraqi Parliament, this would prove to enhance "long term stability" in Iraq.

The Arab Sunnis are a minority comparatively. You need to give each Sunni around 4 votes to accomplish this.

What will the Kurds or Shiites say about this?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 31, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

(chuckle) TJ, I like how you did that by the numbers, I suppose the words of an infamous American politician would have to be invoked before Joeseph's "Sunnah majority" would ever be realized.

"Vote early, vote often."

Great op-ed by Amb Ryan Crocker on the Iraq transition here;

"washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/30/AR2010083003773.html"

(excerpt)

"The threat of al-Qaeda-sponsored terrorism persists in Iraq, as recent attacks have made clear. Iraq's relations with its neighbors, especially Iran and Syria, remain difficult amid signs that Tehran is waiting for a U.S. exit to ramp up its efforts at destabilization and reclaiming the ground it has lost in Iraq the past several years. Other challenges include the rising popular impatience over economic stagnation and the lack of basic services; refugees; widespread corruption; and a growing imbalance between Iraqi military and civilian governance capacities."

---

It's one thing for a member of the public to give his assesment on State's official blog, and folks can deride it as "neo conservative" or some such political labelization, but when those who's job it has been to inmplement policy, parrallel the public comment on the record here that I've offered as food for thought, then WE are apparently in agreement on certain things.

At least I know I'm not talking "with two right feet in my mouth".

"Well a lot of Iraqis are having doubts whether they are ready to do this on their own, and I think that's as natural as a bird learning to fly from its nest with a cat in the yard waiting." -EJ

If anyone wondered what was implied by this "cat" reference in context, I would like to thank Ryan Crocker for illuminating the reason I used the analogy.

I look forward to the President's remarks later today and Iraqi's getting ahold of their present and creating a solid future they can live with, and each other in prosperity and larger freedom.

They will...as long as we have their back on it when folks try to interfere in their progress.

I hope he gives Iran clear warning of "serious consequences" if they continue to try and destabilize Iraq.

He's got to tell Iraqis we "have their back" even though it's their country to build as they see fit and are now responsible for its security and good governance.

That they can count on us to be there when they need us to be with combat forces if nessesary, while the civ and diplomatic part of the deal goes forward long after 2011 as two normalized soverign state's relationships with each other will naturally.

It's real basic for success over the long term.

palgye
|
South Korea
September 1, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

my opinion is stock
rise to friday.

Asia need Japan`s involving, China is also....

palgye
|
South Korea
September 1, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Dear to,

The problem in Iraq now are thought to have been turned into a matter of internal. And, do not rely solely on oil energy, using solar energy systems should also seriously consider the idea. In order to remove a little bit of a difference between rich and poor, the concept of democracy and capitalism, the country is likely to be introduced, most people are ready to accept the system, lack of consideration. The efficient use of water (seawater desalination requires the advice of a computer map of Israel, I think. Start working for peace in the Middle East, I think.)

If the solar energy power supply system for me I think he is trying. Supplies of oil, not just land, people of all possible ways to create access to the new system, I think.

The acquisition of an elite minority that are projected by the government, once again dominated by a particular group of dokjaena people by causing a backlash by religious or ideological areas of conflict will be dominant because of the possibility of new talks.

At a minimum, they need easy access to electricity and water to create a system, a positive approach to the hostile feelings that are considered necessary. If my experience, many companies, but for the publicity, it was a joke. Companies do not know this.
the death to betray,
ignorance is coming from the story.
Important for establishing relations with Israel, which supposes a positive and friendly think. Technology and the money would follow?

Oil is not only a goal to show the point I think.

Thank You.

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