Release of Country Reports on Terrorism

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
August 6, 2010

The Department of State's Country Reports on Terrorism 2009 covers events from January 1 to December 31, 2009. This publication, which fulfills a Congressional requirement, aims to enhance our collective understanding of the international terrorist threat. The report also serves as a reference tool to inform policymakers, the general public, and our foreign partners about our efforts, progress, and challenges in the campaign against international terrorism. You can read the full report here on state.gov.

This fact sheet provides highlights from the report, including the following points:

The U.S. intelligence community assessed that al-Qa'ida and its affiliates, particularly al-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), were actively engaged in operational plotting against the United States.

In 2009, the al-Qa'ida core in Pakistan remained the foremost security threat to the U.S. homeland.

Al-Qa'ida suffered several significant setbacks in 2009 due to Pakistani military operations aimed at eliminating militant strongholds, leadership losses, and increased difficulty in raising money, training recruits, and planning attacks outside of the region.

In addition, the number of imams, clerics, and former militants speaking out against al-Qa'ida increased.

The al-Qa'ida threat was more evenly distributed among its affiliates in 2009. Al-Qa'ida continued its efforts to encourage key regional affiliates and terrorist networks to pursue a global agenda, using both the Internet as a means to distribute propaganda and telecommunications infrastructure to plan attacks and coordinate movements. Going forward, this will be an area of continued focus for the United States.

Iran continued its financial, material, and logistical support for Hizballah, HAMAS, and other terrorist and militant groups throughout the Middle East and Central Asia. Syria also continued to provide safe-haven as well as political and other support to HAMAS, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, and a number of other designated Palestinian terrorist groups.

The U.S. addressed the state insufficiencies that allow terrorists to operate freely by promoting effective civilian law enforcement, good governance, and the rule of law. A major focus of this work involves effectively building capacity and making counterterrorism training for police, prosecutors, border officials, and members of the judiciary more systematic, more innovative, and far reaching. Dozens of countries have passed counterterrorism legislation or strengthened existing laws that provide their law enforcement and judicial authorities with tools to bring terrorists to justice.

The National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) provided a statistical annex to the report. It cautions against placing too much emphasis on the use of attack data to gauge success or failure of our counterterrorism efforts. In 2009, 11,000 terrorist attacks occurred in 83 countries, resulting in more than 15,700 deaths. Attacks decreased by about six percent in 2009 and deaths declined by about 5 percent. This marks the second consecutive year attacks and fatalities decreased. The largest number of reported terrorist attacks in 2009 occurred in South Asia, which also had, for the second consecutive year, the greatest number of fatalities. Together, South Asia and the Near East were the locations for almost two-thirds of the 234 high-casualty attacks (those that killed 10 or more people) in 2009.

Read the transcript of the briefing on the release of Country Reports on Terrorism for 2009here.

Comments

Comments

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 6, 2010

Joseph A. M. in Oregon writes:

In order for the U.S. Administration and for the U.N. to truly collectively understand the "so called international terrorist threat", they need to address the root causes of Islamic Fundamentalism and militancy. The dynamics of the world and conflict has changed dramatically since the end of the Cold War, since 9/11, the focus has shifted to Islamic Fundamentalism. But, rather than addressing the symptoms, such as the U.S. Department of State's "Release of Country Reports on Terrorism" suggests, we need to research and re-evaluate our thinking, by looking at the root causes of this growing phenomenon. The root causes of these challenges continue to be overlooked and in some cases ignored. Why are we continuously seeing these increasing trends, and the tendency by Muslim youth with being attracted in joining "jihadi and militant movements?". The true question which warrants a understanding is, "why are these trends continuing, expanding and becoming more prevalent?" I would start by aggressively pursuing a Middle-East peace settlement, through direct talks and engagement by the Palestinian Authorities and the Israeli's, an immediate priority should be given with establishing a true -- two state solution in the occupied territories. In other regions of conflict, we need to re-establish U.S. policy in line with adapting "Conflict Resolution" and with pursuing a meaningful engagement in dialogue with the Taliban tribal leaders. Since 2002, our strategy and policy in Afghanistan and Pakistan, have been more in line with pursuing "conflict escalation", rather than "resolution". We need to get our overall strategy with the entire Muslim world right.

ERNESTO C.
|
New York, USA
August 6, 2010

Ernesto L.C. in New York writes:

WHEN THIS COUNTRY THA IS THE BEST DEMOCRASI IN THE WOLD,WILL HELP OUR POOR COUNTRY OF NICARAGUA TO GET OUT POWER TO THE TERRORIST GOBERMENT OF NICARAGUA AND HIS PRESIDEN.WE NEED ALL THE MORAL SUPPORT THAT WE CAN GET.
OTHERWISE THE WHOLE CENTRAL AMERICA WILL BE THE SAME AS OF THE 70S AND 80S,PLEASE ACT ASPA. I WILL BE WILLING TO PARTICIPATE IN YOU FOREING POLITICS TOWARD MY BILOVED COUNTRY NICARAGUA.
THANF FOR YOUR UNDERDSTANDING.

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 6, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

August 6, 2010

If the State Department and Law Enforcement Officials would consider my proposal. Give me a contract to hunt down the Most Wanted Terrorists. The known terorists in Yeman to wherever they hide in the world. This would support the FBI and CIA objectives in finding the MOST wanted. Then bring them to Justice in the United States. Using all US resources and law enforcement tools to get the job done. My proposal would be a contract of 50 Million dollars with a 5 year contract, and I would put a team together to HUNT down and capture all MOST wanted Terorists in the world. The State Department has all my info, so if they are serious about catching the bad guys, send me a contract and visa requests for the countries concerned, along with having a contact at the Emassies of the countries with the bad guys. We can start with Yemen first. I would hire a small group of Professionals, law enforcement with the training in the field to capture these terrorists, then turn them over to the Authorities at the US Embassies. Contact me if your serious about getting the Terrorist and bringing them to Justice. Countries like Yemen, Somalia or wherever they hide, we would find them.

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 6, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

August 6th, 2010

The company name I would use is called, (WH) "Wolf Hunt" all persons hired would be US Citizens prior US Military Trained and civilians with experience in the field. The State Department can provide the background investigations on all persons being hired. The goal of the company is to capture the MOST wanted and deadly terrorist in the world. Mission: Provide a team in countries that can locate and bring in Suspected Terrorists to the US Embassies alive to stand trial. The transfer of custody from "Wolf Hunt" to the US Embassy Security Officals. Our company would need all the resources and communications, Satellite clearance in the remote areas. All known intelligence in the affected areas, Once the Capture of the Suspected Terrorists, the FBI can detain and question the Suspects. Our job would not be to question the suspects, but to provide a service of Capturing the Suspected Terrorist and handing them over. We would need VISA clearance and all the support from the US Embassy on the Ground along with working with Special Agents from the CIA and FBI. This should be all coordinated to work as a team. "Team Work" High Value Targets our company would want bonus ontop of the existing 50 Million dollar contract. I think this would be fair especially if these terrorist can be brought in alive to stand trial. Upon receiving a contract we can be on the ground in one month. Once all the paperwork has been approved. 30 days from receiving the contract award, all paperwork and check posted, we hit the ground running with a team that catches the bad guys. All team members would be known to all Security Agencies so we all work together on this. I would also need a shopping list of items to support the Mission, all Approved by the State Department. Once Approved, will submit for all items needed. This would also include a private jet with pilot with all the Diplomatic permits. Our team would be small but very effective in catching the terrorists. If the State Department can move swiftly, award the contract, we can be mobilized very quick. The CIA and FBI can be notified to ensure we all work together. I would also need vehicles and comm equipment on the ground in the countries effected. I'm very serious about this, the goal should be about catching terrorists so they can stand trial. Contact information the State Department should already have. We would abide by the current laws and respect the cultures of these countries.

DrG
|
West Virginia, USA
August 6, 2010

Dr.G in West Virginia writes:

Amazing stats. It shows we need to remain on a war footing.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 6, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@Donald M. in Virginia:

Good morning Donald, you have introduced a very interesting proposal, but your suggestion would assume a strategy of "conflict escalation" and I really think that U.S. Foreign Policy strategy should be more focused on "conflict resolution" and with bridging the gap between potential Islamic militants and "jihadi recruits", rather than going on a high valued target, assassination spree. We need proactive, engaging programs that provide an alternative to Muslim youth who are inspired by joining militant groups, whether in Europe, Asia, the U.S. or in the Arabian Peninsula.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 6, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Joeseph A. M.

Would you consider pouring thousands of additianal US troops and civilian personel into Afghanistan a means to "conflict escalation" or "conflict resolution"?

Given the fact that there are more guns in this country than there are people, (registered firearms mind you, not counting the ones that arn't, and legally so), Donald has an incentive posed here that deserves a little consideration.

In the tradition of a "well diciplined militia" of this nation, there's an untapped reserve of manpower that age should not provide barrier to, as the National Guard of every state has multiple mission parameters both at home and abroad as the need arises.

There's millions of unemployed to tap into, and the government claims to be an equal opportunity employer yet freely descriminates in it's hiring practices on the basis of age requirements.

Where's that "reserve" component to this we heard so much about?

Direct link to the S/CRS and CRC-A main Vacancies page: http://www.crs.state.gov/shortcut.cfm/4TWM

Where's the State Dept's own National Service iniative outreach?

Me, I'd gladly dedicate the rest of my years until retirement to working for the State dept. in return for the chance to go back to school and get a degree.

Where's the micro-lending to US citizens that volunteer their time to come up with solutions and conduct their own outreach to folks globally via the internet?

Half the time I can barely pay my phone bill to keep this up.

We could use all the help we can get to help those that need all the help they can get to end this war on our terms, not on al-quaida's or the taliban's, or Aminidijad's.

If my government wants to issue year round international hunting licences to folks, that's going to require an act of Congress.

We have institutions that will alleviate the need for that if we have the chance to join up.

Thing about doin' the "old folks boogie" is that it's proof positive we ain't dead yet.

Still useful, and yet denied equal opportunity to serve the country.

EJ

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 6, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Terrorism Reports 2009:

scariest aspect of Terror2009 is the state of our economy, our democracy, our civil society. We have taken a huge beating...much directly associated with the diversion of resources and attention away from our own nation-building in this new Millennium.

We have gone hook line and sinker for the global security bait, and now we are getting freelance offers for Murder, Inc. on this blog. My fear is all about a Vietnam era Cambodian incursion redux into Pakistan, and turning to a fresh war-palate in Iran.

These are not unrealistic options given the political currency invested in the Global War on Terror. I sure don't have the answers, but I do know that the U.S. is still the shining light the rest of the world turns to see the future, and we cannot afford to extinguish the light by playing into the script of the "Great Game".

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 6, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@ Joseph A.M. in Oregon

Thanks for your comments but I never said anything about assination, only to capture alive. If you read my statement it said to capture the Suspect and deliver to the nearest US Embassy for processing. The hunt would be to find the terrorist and bring them in. Do not confuse what I'm trying to point out, this is just like law enforcement, you place the suspect in custody for the courts to decide the outcome. All we would do is the catching of the suspects. If there is a better way to handle it, by all means. The sad part is if nothing happens and the next terror attack happens, then what do you say? Especially, when something could of been done to prevent it.

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 6, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico

Thanks, Just trying to see if they are truly serious, or will have to wait n see approach. If the Terrorist are not brought to Justice, they will only continue destroying human life. Its just like living in a city without law enforcement. You have to have Law and Order. The rules and laws should apply to everyone. A terrorist only has to strike once but we have to be ready 100 percent of the time. It just makes more sense to round up the bad guys, let the courts decide.

In reference to the hikers comment, I agree, we all don't want Nuclear War and I also believe a war is coming and not just with Iran.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 6, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@ Donald M. and Ron in N.Y.

We are not a global police force, each country has its own laws and set of rules for detaining personnel, the C.I.A. learned that lesson in 2005, when they unlawfully captured and detained an Egyptian Islamic Cleric off of the streets of Milan, Italy -- over 24 indictments and convictions in the Italian courts followed.

The term "The Global War on Terror (GWOT)" is obsolete and outdated, this classification of our military engagement abroad, ended with the George W. administration.

Thirdly, as a former Scout Recon Infantry soldier, conducting Anti-Terrorist style raids and operations in Berlin at the height of the Cold War, I would have to disagree with your proposal. Please give me a break on this one. Although, your intentions are noble, you would not be able to go into any tribal area or obscure city, Mogadishu or Sana'a, as an example, without encountering lethal firepower. Besides, as an American, your team would stick out like a water-buffalo on a pig-farm.

I like my suggestion better, we need to rethink our strategy and engagement in the Muslim world and assume a policy of engagement through dialogue, including the Taliban tribal leaders in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Our emphasis should be placed on engagement with he youth, globally and with preventing the lure for Muslim youth with wanting to connect with "Islamic fundamenatlist and militant groups".

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 6, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

No Ron , you got it backwards...we're going after "Murder inc." in a big way on this blog, to put them out of buisiness permanent..etc, etc, and ideas matter.

And yeah folks devote resource because some folks intend to win this despite the complaints of those who don't have the answers and still expect the US to be that beacon of freedom we've been to many nations for some time to come.

Now that part of the battle ground has become an international disaster aid relief zone addressing flood victims in Pakistan, al-quaida/taliban will certainly try and exploit this situation, and don't be suprised to see major joint US/Pakistan/Afghan military opperations conducted as one coordinated armed force fighting side by side in response.

Simple logistic fact of life is that life getting back to something approaching "normal" will require this kind of cooperative effort.

We should be putting out the call for the best "man trackers" in the world, and hold an X-games competition, since you like games, think this is a "great game", and nevermind who coined that phrase first, he didn't have a clue when he did either as to what the real deal is.

It's called "protecting populations."

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 6, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Interesting commentary Joseph, thanks for serving by the way...

What's outdated? COIN is in effect, Strategy adapts to the enemy's tactics, but this is a multi-theater-of-war buisiness just as much as WW2 was, just fought differently.

Thus "Global War on Terrorism" is actually very accurate, because it isn't simply a war on a "tactic" used by those without empathy against us.

It defines the parameters of the battlespace, and you don't separate the battle of wills, minds, and ideas from this,

Folks are doing exactly what you wish to see done right now, and that was ongoing from the time Pres. Bush first addressed the nation post 9/11.

Don't try and make this a partisan issue please.

Thanks,

EJ

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 6, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Donald,

I don't do "wait and see" very well, so I think I'll just continue to be relentless in my observations.

NK, Iran, Taliban/al quaida ...you don't think the Khan network has been replaced by now? Take down a gang of drug dealers in the hood, they just get replaced with another set of chumps selling for their drug lord.

And how do they defeat NATO/US and a host of allies?

With a simultaneous coordinated multiple nuclear terrorist incident involving most of the major capital cities, followed by blackmail upon the remanents of civilization.

We the nations of the free world follow with an overwhelming response in kind and in one day over a billion people total have just died.

That's the nuclear war I'm trying to prevent.

Isaac S.
|
Nigeria
August 7, 2010

Isaac L.S. in Nigeria writes:

It is a fundamentally sterile logic to call for engagement with those who murder innocent people in the name God, because the mental template of the Terrorist is violence, pure raw violence. How do engage a person with such mindset? It has to, it must by global war against it. So I do not think the term Global War Against Terrorism is outdated. In Nigeria, local terrorist recently overrun a christian village in Jos, plateau state, murdering innocent children and women that were sleeping. How do you enter into engagement with such vermin's? An eye for an eye. Israel understood this and that little Country must be supported at all cost. It is duty of every Christian. We also support the efforts of US Government to wipe terrorism from the face of this planet. It is war, period!

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 7, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

When words paint a picture they become "quotes of the day" well, this one will be requoted for many days to come no doubt, along with a few other thoughts in the following Op-Ed "The Enemy of My Enemy" in today's Wallstreet Journal online.

It may prove to be the "understatement of the year.""Perhaps the enemy of my enemy is not my friend, if he is an Israeli pilot. In that case, all gestures of friendship will be forsaken or carefully hidden; there will be denunciations and UN resolutions, petitions and boycotts, Arab League summits and hurried trips to Washington. But none of that changes an essential fact of life well understood in many Arab capitals this summer: that there is a clear coincidence of interests between the Arab states and Israel today, in the face of the Iranian threat. Given the 60 years of war and cold peace between Israel and the Arabs, this is one of the signal achievements of the regime in Tehran—and could prove to be its undoing."—Elliott Abrams is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 7, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@ Joseph A.M. Oregon

Will see if your methods and ideas work. I'm not one to disagree if something is working. I think thats why this is called a "Think Tank" because we put our ideas our here and be willing to take constructive critisim. I seriously doubt the State Department would approve of the strategy I fowarded. However, it still doesn't change the fact we have terrorist living in these countries. I actually thought it was a great idea to find the suspects bring them into custody. The country leader of Yemen refused to bring in the Top Terorist? Why? Has to make you wonder, after United States gave them money as well. How ironic we give countries like Yemen money to fight terrorism and they do not arrest the suspects? So I guess my point is, what are they really doing with the money and aid being sent to the Government?

Patrick
|
Maryland, USA
August 7, 2010

Patrick in Maryland writes:

The War on Terrorism has been going on for Centurys. The God they follow is Named Money and his diciples are the Greedy.

They will lie, cheat, steal and even kill to serve their one God. They will also use him to enslave the people of the world.

Think about , which side your on. LOL :)

Good Luck___.)

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 7, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Dipnote bloggers, Senior State Dept officials, and all concerned;

News Item:

North Korea said Friday it would "react with strong physical retaliation to the anti-submarine drill to be staged by the group of traitors in the West Sea," according to the official Korean Central News Agency.

"Our warnings are not empty rhetoric," said Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of the North's ruling Workers' Party, according to Yonhap.

---

Why do we continue to put up with this?

If the only thing that moves China is their economic interests... then if we want them to dismantle the problem they have created by propping up this criminal regime for decades and bought time for 'lil Kim to threaten global peace and security on a weekly basis then why on Earth would we have any monetary debt to China today? When the bill for maintaining peace and security on the Korean peninsula over the last 50 years would most certainly erase it, and then some.

Here we are faced with economic hard times and a dictator threatening nuclear war on a regular basis, and to resolve this won't need further sanctions if we simply send China the bill-payable immediately with interest added.

Then double it, because that ammount would have been the minimum return on our investment in our own economic and social infrastructure over the years had we not had to deal with the problems China has created for everyone in the region in helping to create this madman's ability to harm other nations.

Our's should not be the only bill sent in this manner, at this time. Korea, Japan, they have good claim to make as well.

If we properly incentivise this in a way China will understand intimately, they will do the right thing before we send them a follow-up bill in the aftermath of war that will utterly bankrupt the government of China.

Now either folks @ State will see this to be in our national interests to do, as diplomatic leverage to end the threats of nuclear war, or they won't and the opportunity to stop a war will be lost.

I don't care how loudly China protests, they don't have a legal leg to stand on if we do send them the bill and stop payment to them until they are willing to pay that bill in full and remove 'lil Kim and gang from power, unilaterally at their own expense and trouble.

Time they figure out what it means to be a "stakeholder" and a responsible member of the family of nations.

The thing about the "eternal boycot" I spoke of in reference to all this on another thread is that happens when no one in the US would be caught dead owning anything "made in China". Thus "eternal" was exactly accurate.

Well, the Chinese government now knows what it can look foward to if they don't do the right thing.

And now State has my considered assesment on how to solve this crisis, resolve our national debt, and create a safer world to live in.

I therefore respectfully suggest that the pencil pushers @ DoD, GAO, and other agencies involved over the years get this accounting down to the paper clip and in the mail to Hu by the end of next week, and let him know it's coming, as folks don't like suprises.

You want this to end? Then folks will get real busy and do exactly this.

I figure this ought to satisfy a few of Ron's complaints about "resourcing" as well.

Not that I'm doing this on his account, but in order to turn the mood of the country, we ought to do something really creative (and legal) to propel our fellow Americans to an impromtu standing ovation when they see China do the right thing, and we owe them nothing on top of that because they've paid their bill for being so stupid all these years.

If they truly wish to have a good working relationship with the American people, there won't be a whole lot of quibling over it by China.

Well, that's my "economic stimulus" in a nutshell, works on both sides, for all of mankind. Instant Karma is a trainwreck in the making...and what goes around comes around to all eventually in the global village.

You gotta use the right tool for the job if you want change.

Might as well start now, as late as it is.

'lil Kim is a nuclear terrorist. Folks just don't seem to see that coming.

Well, we still have a choice, and as long as we do, we better make the right one, and China has one to make for their own well being.

Let's make it easy for them to make the right choice.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 8, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@ Donald M. In Virginia:

They recently killed a prominent tribal leader in Yemen, who was engaged with Partners for Peace, an NGO working to establish democratic interaction among the Tribal leaders and the Yemeni government. His name was: Jaber Al-Shabwani, and this strike occurred in Mareb province, on May 25.2010.

This is very disappointing to hear and certainly will not help with the stability efforts being sought for the tribal regions and with establishing a trust for U.S. or Western democratic institutions working towards establishing confidence and dialogue with the tribal leaders. This, needless air-strike has been a very sad occurrence for the people of Yemen who were greatly engaged and working with this Tribal leader trying to build a better future for Yemeni society.

Anyway, your comment must be referring to the conservative Islamic Cleric, who is a prominent Imam in the Arabian Peninsula, you must be referring to Anwar Al-Awalaki, a U.S. citizen -- it's complicated to explain the dynamics of Yemen in a few words. But, they are a Tribal society, like Afghanistan and Pakistan and a Islamic State, the tribal laws that they adhere to supersede any form of national governance, they are community based collectivistic societies, as we know it in the West. The Tribal laws governing this society precede Islam and date back, some five thousand years. I do not agree with the notion of the U.S. trying to capture, the Yemen Imam, he is a religious leader and a influential cleric and he practices a conservative ideology and form of Islam. But, there are thousands of Imam's, who hold this same ideology and conservative view-point, what sense would it make for the U.S. to target or seek out one Imam in Yemen? It's counterproductive, besides I'm against any form of "drone air-strike or air-launched missile strikes" for this part of the World, meaning the Muslim World. There are legitimate reasons behind my argument.

What should be the U.S. Department of State's focus on Yemen? Establish a dialogue and working rapport with Tribal leaders and Islamic Clerics, state building and assistance for the development of this strategically important country!

Recently,I attended a briefing on the "Tribal Conflict and Resolution in Yemen", where my good friend, presented the dynamics of establishing a working rapport and dialogue with the Yemen Tribal Leaders, by adapting the concepts of Conflict Resolution. Our focus in the Arabian peninsula should be on establishing stability and nation building.

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 8, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Terror Report: 2010

Several rehesrsals of terrorist attacks in major cities have successfully demonstrated that security defenses can be breached. The challenge facing us in 2010 is to prevent a nuclear suitcase device from being delivered and detonated. This will only be acheived by high levels of integrated human intelligence. Loose nukes are priority One for the coming year.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 8, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Joeseph and Donald,

Well we can discus R.O.E. all day long, as well as engagement, but when it comes down to the bottom line on terror we should take this following attitude to heart because a single scholar may just have changed the nature of the mental battlespace in the global war on terror. If it goes "viral".

As we get down to morality, and how this nation goes about prosecuting this war, and the terrorists, I think it's fair to say that Muslims themselves have now set down a firm set of rules of engagement in their war on terrorism. We should probably follow their lead on this.

"http://www.minhaj.org/images-db2/fatwa-eng.pdf"

Donald, I don't think they are inclined to "take prisoners" as there are none where it concerns minds. There's a change of heart that gets folks to lay dowm their weapons and walk a path of peace, or they can rest in peace, but there will be peace.

And this fatwa pretty well sums that concept up.

Someone obviously did their homework on this, and next time Dipnote & State want to do a "Conversation with America" on "US Engagement with Muslim Communities", you'all should film on location in the UK (which should be easy enough) and have a chat with the author of this fatwa.

For two basic reasons, one that it will help folks understand terrorism from the inside of Islam, and the man's concerns with US policy may find resolution at the same time in public discourse.

He's holding a very interesting "summer camp" for Muslim youth in the UK to train them to take on the terrorist mindset and destroy its influence in the Muslim world.

Anyway, "Dead or Alive" works for me, as long as terrorists are no longer any threat whatsoever to civilization, because there are none left.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 9, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

For Eric, Donald in Virginia, Ron in New York and he U.S. Department of State Senior Staff;

Please pass on to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder

I briefly had heard about the summer camp in the U.K. on Friday, while listening to PRI Radio, BBC's programming "The World Today". This newly formulated program is structured as an outreach for reaching Muslim Youth residing in the U.K. and is designed to engage with "Muslim Youth" and with reaching, what I would classify as "potential candidates" who are prime candidates in being lured to a false representation of Islam, by seeking to join and answer a calling for known "Jihadi groups". The Muslim Youth, which my masters thesis focuses on, are potentially the most vulnerable and likely candidates in joining "Al Shabaab, Al Qaeda, or any Jihadi militant fundamentalist group", especially given the perception of the U.S. and NATO forces engagement in conflict, in several Muslim countries globally (including Pakistan). Understanding, Islamic fundamentalism from "inside Islam" is my speciality and the first rule in Islam 101 is, that you should not use the bias word "terrorism", this is a radicalized movement and a conservative form of Islam.

That said, this is a brilliant idea with reaching our Muslim youth and potentially may stop would be "suicide bombers, jihadist being lured by the glories of warfare in fighting in places like Somalia and elsewhere. This newly formulated outreach program in the U.K. is in line with "engagement with the Muslim Youth" and should be brought to the attention of Farah Pandith, U.S. Department of State, Special Representative for Muslim affairs. I would like to take the lead role and challenge in, implementing such a model program, similar to that of the U.K., here in the U.S. nationwide. This would be an ideal tool in counter-terrorism, and should be immediately implemented in what I would call, U.S. hot spots; Minneapolis, Detroit, Dearborn, Virginia, and in the D.C. area.

Additionally, I would like the U.S. Department of State to consider my proposal, posted earlier on this blog "Release of Country Reports on Terrorism", we need to re-think our engagement and military intervention in the entire Muslim world, from Pakistan to Dakar, Senegal. I'm in favor of engagement in dialogue with the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan, our primary focus should be on assuming a meaningful dialogue with the Tribal leaders and in pursuing a emphasis on "nation-building".

I adamantly disagree with Ron from New York, on the greatest threat we will face during the upcoming year, being a suitcase nuclear device. This sounds more like a Hollywood film to me than reality. The recent Pakistani American (Faisal Shahzad), who left a SUV, parked in Times-square, in front of the very spot I stood, two weeks earlier to his failed attempt -- well, fortunately, he couldn't even get a simple, homemade, conventional style explosive device to work, it was amateurish and failed to explode in saying the least. Like, back in December, Umar Abul-Muttalab's failed underwear, make-shift explosives on the commercial airline inbound for Detroit, and the recent arrests of approximately 14 Americans who sought and travelled to Somalia in an effort in joining "Al Shabaab", and some are actually fighting alongside this militant fundamentalist group. There have been many such instances over the past seven years, young Muslim youths, who have promising futures with their academic programs, in sports and in their U.S. communities, being lured by a "false representation of Islam" or a misrepresentation of "jihad" under the context of the Quran. This is the real most likely threat that the U.S. faces for the next five years, U.S. passport and American Muslims seeking to follow the foot-steps of Faisal Shahzad and Umar Abul-Multtalab, not a "black market" procured nuclear device getting in the hands of a "radical Islamic militant" group. I profoundly disagree with this analysis suggesting that a "rogue nuclear device" should be our first priority in countering a potential terrorist threat -- please, get real people. Please contact me directly, if Special Representative Farah Pandith and the U.S. Department of State would like for me to take the lead role with initiating a similar program in the U.S., a "Muslim Youth Summer" and even, with establishing a "year round Camp", as an outreach program, designed in reaching our Muslim youth residing in the U.S.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 9, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Well then Joeseph, since the fatwa makes such reference... if you read all of it, knowing the references in the Koran the man cited and considering the way the word "terrorist" was used in this fatwa, the only one's "insulted" by the term, are those that twist Islam for their terrorist agenda.

Bein' that it's a terrorist's lack of empathy that defines them as such rather than any rationale trhat may lie behind it, religious, political, or otherwise.

"Terror has no religion," as Sec. of State Clinton put it corrcetly.

This is why any thought of a "war on Islam" is simply false propoganda uttered by terrorists to confuse Muslims.

According to the program notes;

"Al Hidayah 2010" is a unique and one of the first anti-terror camps in the UK. In his uniquely enthralling style Shaykh-ul-Islam Dr Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri will deliver a series of ground-breaking lectures examining contemporary issues faced by the Muslims especially those in the West such as Terrorism, Suicide Bombings, Jihad, Khilafah and their clarifications based on the recent Fatwa on Terrorism. By the end of the series, you will no doubt come away with a greatly enhanced appreciation of these concepts as THE religion of peace, love, mercy and knowledge, as well as gaining clarification of your role within wider society."

So they obviously don't mind using the term "Terrorist" to describe Khilafah.

I think you missed something, this "camp" isn't for "at risk" youth, he's training these young folk as envoys to talk to "at risk youth" at eye level, to exert "peer pressure" on them.

That's what makes it unique.

Anyway, it's nice to see a few thoughts of mine posted here and sent to a few Muslim leaders in America previously have proven themselves valid in practice.;
http://blogs.state.gov/index.php/site/entry/discussion_engagement_muslim...

"1.Terrorists, in their methodology have been killing innocent Muslims, In Iraq, London, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Indonesia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kashmir, USA, (9/11), Kenya, Lebanon, and a host of other nations in many attacks over the years.

2. These attacks against civilians.innocents, regardless of any so-called intended target or purpose, political or otherwise are in direct violation of the Islamic code of conduct of Jihad. (Defined above.)

3. These attacks have placed Muslim communities at risk, both directly and indirectly, taking innocent life, and causing political unrest within the religion of Islam.

4. The targeting of Mosques, the creation of ethnic and religious conflict between Sunni and Shiite sects of Islam the attempt to start a nuclear war between Pakistan and India, as well as the direct threat to the teachings of Islam, also represent a threat to "the community" as a whole.

5.a.. If a Muslim community comes under attack, then jihad becomes an obligation for all Muslims, male and female, in that community
b.. If that particular community feels it cannot fight off attackers on its own, then jihad becomes incumbent on Muslims living in nearby communities
c.. If a Muslim ruler of a country calls for jihad, then it is incumbent upon the Muslims living under that ruler to join the jihad.

6. The community is under attack. Jihad is an obligation.

7. It is self evident that all communities are being attacked, all peoples, all civilization. Jihad becomes incumbent on Muslims living in all communities.

8. Muslim rulers of Afghanistan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iraq, Pakistan, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, and many others have joined the "war on terrorism" the global jihad against terrorists which includes as it's allies, and brothers in arms those nations that are not Muslim, but have significant Muslim populations within their sovereign boundaries.

9. These non-Muslim nations, recognizing the risk to all peoples in their lands, including Muslims, have called for solidarity in this fight from all Muslims of true heart and mind.

10. Let there be no ambiguity in this logic. Let their be no hiding place, no sanctuary given, no sponsor of terror, no terrorist left once this jihad is justly called for by all Muslims of true faith, and finished.

Perhaps it takes a Buddhist infidel like myself to place objective logic in its proper perspective, without bias toward Islam, or cultural tradition."

Well, the Fatwa does represent an interesting development in a "young" religion.

We be only what they might consider "outside voices" Joeseph.

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 9, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@Eric in New Mexico,

Thank-you for your extremely insightful commentary and for clarifying the intent of the "Muslim Youth Summer Camp", I have yet to read the story and go to the link that was posted by you on DipNote. I have a few academic papers to write, so my time is limited, but this idea and outreach program, being implemented in the U.K. is definitely a program worth pursuing and adapting in the U.S. I am quite sure, if a U.S. Department of State official, would pass the information along to Special Representative Farah Pandith and Attorney General Eric Holder, they would agree with my analysis.

Whether running a Summer Camp for carefully selected Muslim Youth, from various communities, and having them go back into those same communities and hold discussions on "how the perception of Jihad and joining Islamic Militant groups is misleading" or actually having, potential "radicalized Jihadi Muslim Youth" attend the training Camp session, is irrelevant. These are both worthy outreach programs, and should be considered by the U.S. Department of State of future implementation in the U.S. Dr. Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri has developed a brilliant concept in his design for reaching Muslim Youth, whether as trainers to go back into their respective communities, or expanding with including "Muslim Youth" who potentially are likely in choosing this path of "jihad" and violence by joining known radicalized groups.

We are outside voices, but I have a professor of Islamic Studies, who has assisted me on my thesis research in Milan, who knows the right academic and Muslim professionals who are "inside voices" that could make this type of program and outreach work, really work and productive here in the U.S. I've already have worked on a "Muslim Cultural exchange program" for the U.S. Department of State, while assigned in Milan in 2008 -- under "the U.S Ambassador's Fund for Counter-terrorism".

Eric, honestly, thank-you very much for your valuable and thoughtful insight, point well taken, but I still do not like the word "terrorism, and it is offensive to the Islamic community", I know this, I conducted extensive research in Italy with Muslim Youth, and participated in the 2008 GMI Conference in Umbria Italy, where I participated in focus groups with a representation of the Muslim Youth, from Italy -- I was an outsider at this conference, the only "Non-Muslim" permitted to attend by special arrangement.

I read the article and look at the program in more detail, when I have a moment. Best,

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 9, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Joeseph,

When you get around to it, maybe you'll consider what I had to say on the thread I linked in my last post as well, there's a thesis there somewhere...(chuckle).

There's a reason I spent the better part of a week defining one word to the satisfaction of both Muslims and non Muslims on that thread, not an easy thing...you might find a conversation between OC and myself to be priceless follow-up on the "continuing the conversation" Dipnote thread as well.

There's a fellow from Nigeria on this one who has told you exactly what the deal is, if you look down the comments aways. He pretty well illustrated the difference between acadamia and the real world on-the-ground-reality of the nature of the beast.

Hard to argue with too isn't it?

The same reason so many have disagreed with your "analysis" regarding non-use of the phrases "Terrorism", "The global war on Terrorism", and other aspects of your "analysis" in public, is the same reason the US gov. probably won't agree with it either.

Not they'll completely agree with mine, but if sending a bill will solve debt and a crisis, they might be thinking about it, who knows?....(chuckle).

See, when folks use the word "fundementalist" in context to "terror- mind", that is insulting to the roots of Islam isn't it? It's incorrect statement for one. The Fatwa gets down to the fundementals of Islam in a big way.

However,

It's all a ego-centric religious means of declaring rightiousness and purity is it not?

Terrorists try to decieve in such manner, while the sane do this, trying to offset misperceptions of their faith by those that arn't of the Muslim school of thought (which has a few schools within the school itself).

The whole world is my teacher Joseph, has been for a long time.

My job as a citizen is simply to inspire folks to think.

Every once in awhile I manage to get "everyone thinking", at least according to those that have accused me of this....(chuckle).

So you're very welcome, and while I don't expect my words to appear in your Master's Thesis (or I'd have to get the U. to award me your degree), I hope it inspires the thinking on the critical level it takes not to believe everything your teachers think, or all that you do either, and think outside of your own box to write a good one.

I look forward to reading it if you post a link someday. Good luck with it,

EJ

If you be student of the human condition, one holds no corner on truth, for that is universal to every major religious school of thought as envioronment allows perception of these truths to manifest, in context with humanity, civilization, and conflict resolution, as well as in times of peace.

We could do a comparitive analysis of the Constitution's second ammendment and the concept of Jihad, and the commonality would be found in that both are intended to "protect populations".

Joseph M.
|
Oregon, USA
August 10, 2010

Joseph A.M. in Oregon writes:

@Eric and Isaac L.S. in Nigeria:

First of all, thank-you once again Eric, you always manage to stimulate my think in a different direction and even though I do not agree with you on every topic we contemplate on, you have inspired my thinking, at least from an intellectual standpoint.

Now, down to business. I completely disagree with Isaac from Nigeria, I've devoted a great deal of my academic program, studying, analyzing and debating the many conflicts in Sub-Sahara Africa, particularly the religious conflict in Northern Nigeria and Jos. What I have to say about it is, that the international community and the Nigerians need to assume a mind-set, based on reconciliation and with "promoting cultural awareness", they need to learn how to live with each other peacefully, regardless of the profound religious differences. Whether in Jos, Darfur,Jerusalem, or in the Palestinian territories. The day that the U.S. government will officially adapt the policy and strategy that Isaac from Nigeria has suggested, "an eye for an eye", will be the beginning of the end for the United States of America, particularly with our government seeking respect and with assuming a leadership role globally. Having a Nation State assume the "tit for tat" strategy when engaging others, will lead to more violence, conflict, hostilities towards the "other" and will never achieve a peace-full resolution. Northern Nigeria is in a difficult situation and the historical dynamics of this religious conflict in Jos are worth looking into and resolving without promoting further violence. Eric, I will read at look at more closely your posted link later this week. Thanks again for your insight.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 10, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Joseph, I'll save you a little trouble scanning posts...(part 1 of 2)

"You've never met me, but my family's role in history changed everything.

Friendly fellow who's team brought a child into being that lights cities, and threatens the species.

To end war forevermore, by building a bomb that cannot be used and remain civilized.

Who then would believe me?

I am simply a terrorist's worst nightmare, at your service."

---

I'm just doin' my job as a citizen and here's the proof as a case study within historical documents to be found in a Presidential library, along with a book in another one (little family history) in which way back on the fellow's last capaign stop before he became President (and his wife has gone on to exceed him in popularity as Sec. of State), I wrote the following on the flyleaf before giving it to his staff to give to him, and he did "look foward to reviewing it." based on his reply in thanks for it:

" This is a slice of times past, to give perspective on the present, so that in the future we can eliminate the threat of nuclear war. The greatest threat we face today is that terrorists will obtain nuclear weapons."

I've lost count how many folks in governments around the world have said exactly this and my own government cited the example I used in the following many times in the course of prosecuting the war on terrorism. Followed the outline of the plan to a virtual tee.

I may not have a "need to know" if the NSC got a kick out of passing it around the President's daily briefing after I sent it and they opened it 4.5 hours later (real time). That's part 2 of 2 coming up.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 10, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Joeseph,

Is what it is; (part 2 of 2)

>Date: Wed, 19 Sep 2001 03:41:03 -0600
>To: secretary@state.gov
>From: Eric in New Mexico
>Subject: "Powell doctrine"-Exit options

Dear Mr. Secretary,

It seems logical to me when looking at the rebuilding of Germany and Japan after WW2, why we haven't been targets of terrorism by these former enemies, it may also be logical to view the rise of Hitler as a direct result of the sanctions imposed opon Germany at the end of WW1.

I agree that the war that has been declared upon us will take time, and cost much to win. I hope you will forgive my being so bold as to propose the following;

Based opon the fact that the people of Afghanistan have no self-determination of their fate, and are at the mercy of the Taliban(or who-ever controls them), and given the fact so many are abandoning the country in fear, it seems to me that this mission must be a liberation, not a reprisal, I mean by this that we perform surgery-heal the patient(Afghanistan).
In order to retain support, especially throughout the Arab world, for a sustained presence in the region, it will be necessary to address the humanitarian needs of the refugees immediately to;
A.Show compassion in the midst of our wrath.
B.To prevent further human suffering due to terrorist acts opon us.
I will base the following on the assumption that the military surgery undertaken will remove the cancer in a similar fashion as in WW2-unconditional surrender.(*)
Given the resulting void in government structure, and to avoid setting up what might be viewed as a "puppet" government, I propose this as an alternative:
Restore the government prior to the Soviet invasion, most of that ruling family is in exile.(although a monarchy,it held democratic ideals despite the influence of the Soviets and had no clue about the Soviet agenda until too late) . I have only my gut instinct to go on,but the "northern alliance" might agree to this as it would bring the country full circle, bringing hope again and the ability to function as a distinct political entity in the U.N.
In addition I believe that the whole premise by which we may safely exit the situation with the goals in hand is this;
If the average Afghan citizen can say they're better off than they were before the Taliban took over, and having the world's help rebuilding, not only will the world respect us, but we'll give them nothing to hate us for in the future.
The massive response with food, shelter, clothing to the refugees prior to any action against the Taliban or bin Laden will immediately let the
world know without a doubt that we consider them victims of terrorist aggression, and that our mission is to rid them of this and restore sanity.
If we do this right, the long term prognosis will be a full recovery from a terminal illness. Afghanistan may need a decade of peace to achieve this.
The stability necessary for this can only come from the people's desire to be at peace, and a hope for the future.
(*) Unconditional surrender in this case does not require use of nuclear weapons to achieve objective, if used, all support will evaporate, and the objective(long term)is lost. I believe it's logical given the terrain, that this may have been considered, hopefully only for a fraction of a second.

I must apologize for not having introduced myself.
I'm a house painter, a trade which allows me to have way too much time on my hands to think about things. Father to two girls who stop traffic unintentionally.

Granddad worked on the bomb with Oppenhiemer, therefore my interest in history and sociology, and partially my reason for this e-mail. The other is to help if I can.

---end

( The rest was just personal stuff, edited and deleted for posting)

Understanding evolves, don't stop learning because you are invested in your viewpoint, time and other's investment in your's will determine its credibility.

( that's why someone wanted to know who the heck had the stones to offer Colin Powell an "exit option" to his military doctrine and opened it in the first place.)

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 10, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Folks talk about "end states" and "timelines", and for being just an outline of an idea, a course of action in the wake of 9/11, folks will have to simply see these things for how they were expressed and the conditions upon which they were deemed opperative to the overall solution.

"10 years of peace" was your Civ. end of the deal after combat opps were done and security had been established, I didn't give a timeline on that aspect because war is unpredictable by it's very nature, and doesn't lend itself to neat tidy endings on anyone's schedual, let alone for those who only want peace.

"Full circle" was that "end state" and the reason given was clear for it's being the goal.

The "how to get there from here?" well folks...I either got "everyone thinking" or I didn't...don't you just love a mystery?

Thing is, I've asked, my Senator's office has asked for me, and the previous Admin. never could tell that office that I hadn't.

You'd think the Whitehouse and State Dept. would know one way or another.

I have no idea what policy was invoked not to inform this citizen , but my opinion of that aspect of the mystery would best be summed up by two letters...B.S.

Did anyone ever consider I might want to tell my kids, dad helped create a safer world someday if in fact I did get folks thinkin'?

It ain't too late, I'm not dead yet, it would be real nice to know one way or another, and I hope folks are listening?

The credit belongs to those who made the decisions and gave their lives to make this happen.

If you were in my shoes, having given Colin Powell the "exit option" I did, at the time I did, and seeing the results manifest within weeks and months, the King's return, a government formed to take its place among the family of nations again, the "world's help rebuilding", massive aid delivered to Afghan refugees...this was one serious pot of "stone soup" put on the boil for my government's consideration.

While a third of this country was perfectly willing to nuke bin laden's training camps and call it good. That's no joke, and my waning issued because my government is only human and prone to err.

It's been said that if one joins the Marine Corps a fellow never need to question whether he made a difference or not in this global war on terror. Does every day.

Semper fi to one and all, and a big HOOah! from a very small voice in all things considered.

Maybe I'll still be around when it's all declassified, and just maybe I'll know then for sure.

Life is like that sometimes, isn't it?

One big learning experience.

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