U.S. Accelerates Flood Relief Assistance to Pakistan

Posted by Rick Snelsire
July 31, 2010
Relief Goods Loaded Into C-130 Plane for Flood Affected People in Pakistan

About the Author: Rick Snelsire serves as Spokesperson at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan.

The U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan, Anne W. Patterson, announced today that the U.S. government is continuing to send assistance for flood relief efforts in the country. "The United States supports Pakistan's emergency relief efforts on behalf of people affected by recent monsoon floods," said Ambassador Patterson.

In response to Pakistan's National Disaster Management Authority's specific request for the following assistance, the United States is providing:

Four Zodiac inflatable rescue boats, which are designed and built for lightness and speed on rapidly flowing waters;

Two water filtration units, which provide pumping, purification, storage and distribution. Each unit can fulfill the daily water requirements of up to 10,000 people;

An initial delivery of more than 50,000 halal meals from U.S. supply depots in the region. The meals are being delivered to Pakistan's military for distribution in flood-stricken areas. In addition, arrangements are being made to deliver more halal meals to Pakistan in the coming days.; and

Twelve pre-fabricated steel bridges that can temporarily replace highway bridges damaged by flooding in Peshawar and Kurram Agency. The Provincial Government and Pakistan's military are coordinating their efforts to ensure the use of these bridges.

Friday, the U.S. provided helicopters to support the Ministry of Interior's rescue operations. The MOI 50th Squadron has been able to rescue more than 400 people isolated by the flood waters. Food and water also has been ferried to people still not able to leave the flood areas. Helicopter operations are continuing today.

Additional assistance will be provided based on the Government of Pakistan's assessments of humanitarian needs.

Comments

Comments

M. A.
|
Pakistan
August 1, 2010

Asif in Pakistan writes:

Many thanks for your help on this

Ron
|
New York, USA
August 1, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Relief to Pakistan?

The resent $500 million aid package, Textile
Industry development assistance and flodd relief aid flies in the face of Pakistan's
support for AQI and Taliban Terrorists Afghanistan....It is quite obvious that we are
trying to buy Pakistan as an ally or lease it
as a staging area for our continued operations. How can we justify aid to Pakistan
while the government violates Human Rights, supports terrorism and plays both ends for its own gain?

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 2, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

August 2, 2010

I agree 100 percent with you Ron in New York. What in the sam hell is going on. Our country gives aid to Pakistan while they train terrorist to fight our own soldiers. This is complete madness. You don't give money to a country that helps the Taliban. Giving money to them will only cause more problems for our troops. If you truly do not care about our forces in Afghanistan and give money to Pakistan, then atleast get our forces home safe. You can't play this game on both ends like Mr. Ron said. Whoever has the bright idea that you can give aid to the enemy while they behead innocent people is crazy. Stop this non-sense. Pakistan IS NOT AN ALLY of the United States. If they were, we wouldn't have the Taliban insurgents crossing the border into Afghanistan.

Wake UP and Smell the Java, you can't and should not give money to a country that promotes terrorism. I would like to see a full investigation into Pakistan. In the past ten years of our country giving them aid, selling them aircraft that can deliver the Nuclear Weapon and Jets, which could be used against our forces. You also have another big problem, the Taliban intercepting communications in Pakistan and Afghanistan which is being used also against our US Forces. I believe Pakistan is responsible for what happened on 9/11. This country should of been added to the axe of Evil List. Its about time someone gets with the program and adds this country asap. Stop giving them aid, plenty of other countries in the world could use the aid, and they do not promote terrorism. I would also suspect there is already an investigation into the donations given to this country. The situation about an Army Soldier leaking information on wikileaks, the Website owner should be in jail for compromising National Secuirty. This should carry a felon offense against our National Security. The Soldier and the Webiste owner should be in prison for Treason acts. If you don't make an example out of the vehicle and the person who committed the act, how much more will be put into the public eyes which do not belong and compromise our troops even more? Shut down Wikileaks website, and arrest the owner. Maybe if they spent some time in a Federal Prison they will figure out they cannot print information that can hurt our people.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 2, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

(a historical perspective)

"As for Pakistan and India, rather than just asking them to get it together, and stand down, there may be the need for the U.S. to consider other options, to prevent the Asian subcontinent from becoming uninhabitable.
In my opinion, nuclear war is the ultimate terrorist act.
If these two nations cannot see the way to peace, then we just have to convince them, if need be, to prevent the loss of life and ecosystem, that cannot be replaced. If that worst case scenario occurs, the results of nuclear war having been studied, I don't need to remind any one of the possible irreversible environmental damage, loss of life, etc. Just add to that a few Chernobyls on top, in the case of this war, considering the nuclear power plants in the area.
If they choose war, we must I believe, if we have the time and capacity to stop it, act in a considered and concrete way to prevent holocaust. In the fact that the timing of this situation stinks, I have to wonder if it smells of Al-Quaida, the resulting evidence of the groups responsible for the attacks in India, and their known support by both Pakistan and the Taliban suggests to me a connection. Done to help bin Ladin escape? Pakistan helps the U.S., Pakistan is targeted, via India.
Despite the reliance on prophesy and questionable psychic resources, bin Ladin's not to be underestimated, he knows how to play a situation for all it's worth, I think it's evident to most Afghans at this point, that as a "guest" he broke every rule, including wrecking the host's dwelling. He may believe that widening the conflict will serve his ends, in the short term at least, I think it has. Until the Pak intelligence service is totally purged of all individuals supporting terrorism, we still will have serious problems down the road as well.
India's not much better in some regards, if they have acted so wisely in Kashmir, why the conflict? M. Gandhi taught them nothing?
There's only one thing they can do with Kashmir to end this once and for all, that's to turn it into a "co-national park" with internationally (interim) monitored local rule. They either learn to share, or lose it forever, as the case may be if war happens.
I hope that if the situation is not resolved by dialog, they'll end up thanking the U.S. in the long run, for stepping in to stop it. By whatever conventional military and diplomatic means available.
We've been accused of playing world cop, as a nation. If you ask any officer on any street in the U.S. what his/her least favorite call to get is and they'll more than likely say, "Domestic disputes". This is the only politically correct way I can think to describe the current world situation. If we must play that role, they need to understand that there's a new sheriff in town, determined to prevent domestic violence.
This goes as well for the Mideast, the Korean, and other long standing conflicts.
To "protect and serve humanity, and ensure the preservation of civilization, of all cultures, and ways of tradition that an individual or nation has the inalienable right to choose for themselves as they see fit, so long as it harms no other individual's, or nation's ability to do so."
With this as our philosophy, as policy, the "undiscovered country" may become reality. This is not a role that should be played unilaterally, as it is essentially all nation's task."

- EJ, 1/8/02 "Isotope Road" - (Citizen NIE written in response to the 2001-2002 Nuclear Posture Review released a few days prior.)

---

When this nation in the midst of its wrath after 9/11 had the sense to treat Afghans as victims of terrorism just as we had been, we dumped tonnes of food to refugees in addition to the tonnage of bombs dropped on the Taliban and al-quaida. 4.5 million returned home because we took a correct attitude as well as making it kineticly possible.

Pakistan isn't really any different save that unlike the Taliban, we've come to an understanding with that government about terrorists.

They don't harbor terrorists and we don't remove them from power.

We will however reserve the right to go hunting whenever and wherever nessesary to get the job done and eliminate those that pose a threat to the USA.

Since individuals supporting terrorists have not yet been purged in all this time, we obviously still have problems arising because of it.

However, what this nation does to feed , cloth, and provide shelter for folks in harm's way has to remain separate from any political consideration. That's tradition.

The only consideration is for saving as many lives as possible, and doing so efficiantly and with the appropriate attitude in being happy to lend folks a hand.

And Asif in Pakistan knows what's up with this, and I may not speak for USAID or State...but "We're there anytime you need us to be brother." seems the appropriate opperative attitude to return his thanks with.

EJ

Leonard
|
Ohio, USA
August 2, 2010

Leonard in Ohio writes:

"There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root." Thoreau

It amazes me that there are Americans so short-sighted and mean-spirited as to condemn thousands of already poverty-stricken and war-weary villagers to exposure, starvation and disease due to a massive natural disaster. Humanitarian aid is the most efficient and cost-effective route to doing real "hearts and minds" work, even if parts of it do get siphoned off and/or misdirected.

Although the relationship has always been...challenging...for both sides, Pakistan and the US have been allies for a lot longer than 10 years. Yes, there's been a lot of double-dealing and other shady incidents, but even that is unsurprising. The biggest problem is that the US has historically tended to abruptly lose interest and leave Pakistan in the lurch, fending for itself (which, given its shaky economy and shakier political environment, is not easy). In their experience the Pakistanis frankly have little reason to trust us, so they basically act as if we might vanish at any moment: get what you can while you can, because who knows what Uncle Sam will do tomorrow?

One thing that might begin rebuilding trust is actually putting our money where our mouths are when it comes to humanitarian assistance. When a massive earthquake struck "Axis of Evil" member Iran in 2003, the United States - under President George W. Bush, no less - offered humanitarian aid. Why should our longtime ally Pakistan be cut off? It seems that what is actually (if indirectly) being espoused in earlier comments is imposing sanctions on an ally.

Refusing aid to Pakistan would:
A: throw our entire humanitarian assistance program into question
B: send a really rotten message to our other allies
C: hamper the capability of the Pakistani military to maintain pressure on the Taliban/AQ militias; if PAKMIL has no aid to offer, people will turn in desperation to other less desirable sources of aid; PAKMIL will grow even more unwelcome in FATA
D: accelerate (if not precipitate) the ongoing civil war and descent of Pakistani civil society into failed-state status, likely resulting in yet another military government takeover.

Sadly, that last one is probably inevitable at this point. What can Zardari be thinking, leaving the country on a diplomatic junket to Paris and London while this is ongoing? I suppose we should all start getting used to the idea of "President Kayani."

Bilal E.
|
California, USA
August 2, 2010

Bilal E. in California writes:

If you are interested in sending aid to the locals, I highly recommend this organization.
"www.hidaya.org/social-welfare/disaster-relief/-pakistan-floods-2010"

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 2, 2010

Donald in Virginia writes:

@Leonard in Ohio

Talk to the 63 American Soldiers family who losed their loved ones last month in Afghanistan, about being mean spirited? Who condemed them? Who aided them? Ask them how they feel about what you just said? Maybe they have some short sightness about this whole situation. Ask them, when they will see their loved ones again? Human rights? Has the Taliban been using Human rights when they behead innocent people? The 8th Ammendment? How does this apply when they are destroying American lives? They capture and torture our people and you say give them aid? Instead of promoting Africa on this website which continues to happen all the time, maybe the State Department should include the pictures of the American Soldiers who defend the rights which people seem to forget. They are the ones who are defending your free speech, your freedom. They all should be honored. The Fallen Soldiers should be added to this website blog. After all this is the United States of America State Department.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 3, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Donald,

The Pakistani military has lots thousand of people hunting down Taliban and al-quaida, driving them from swat and now involved militarily in all but one tribal province.

It is incorrect for you to make such a lump-sum generalization that all Pakistanis support those who fight us in Afghanistan.

BBC News Item;

"I believe that the international community, which Pakistan belongs to, is in the process of losing the war against the Taliban, and that is, above all, because we have lost the battle for hearts and minds," Le Monde quoted him as saying.

"It is unfortunate that certain individuals continue to express doubts and fears about our determination to fight militants to the end," Mr Zardari said in a statement released before visiting the French foreign minister.

---

This is not an adequate response to the "fifth column" within various political factions within government.

Nor is it a "winning attitude" unless he intends to motivate people to get the job done by such an assesment.

To do that, he's going to have to rid himself and his people of a certain ingrained "victim mind" created by the very elements that have now turned against the state and its people.

That may be hardest of all for the man personally, having lost his wife to terrorism.

He's got as bad a corruption problem as Karzai has if not worse and instead of dealing with it, he's essentially throwing up his hands and blaming folks for calling him on it, even if he inhereted the problem.

I think he wanmts to end this problem as much as anyone, but he seems reluctant to tackle Pakistan's own internal political deamons.

I think if we know the individuals involved in supporting terror then we provide him a list of names to prosecute.

Or we can do the prosection for him, as his choice.

That's straitforward enough that there'll be no "misunderstandings" in the future.

When Pakistan's soveregnity is at risk from terrorists I really don't think we'd be violating it any further than it has been if that's what it takes to get the job done where al-quaida is enjoying safe haven.

Let's see if the Pak military has the stones to fight this as one army between us, together, and as one people with a common problem.

Attitude is everything.

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 3, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@Eric in New Mexico

The Taliban which grows in Pakistan to train and fight our forces in Afghanistan, we had 63 soldiers killed last month. If Pakistan Government and Intelligence Agency was on the ball, we shouldn't have any US Casaulties in Afghanistan. The bottom line is, Pakistan has like 10K troops on the border yet they can't stop the Taliban from crossing? I don't blame all Pakistan people, I blame those that are training the Taliban in Pakistan that are fighting our forces. I believe the Pakistan Intelligence needs to step up to the plate and get the job done. If they are our allies, then they need to prove it on the ground. So far... its our forces that come under heavy fire. I can have empathy for those in Pakistan that are not involved with the Taliban. I have no empathy for Taliban members. This group that treats women in the cave man days, and still beheads people?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 3, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Donald,

Do you wan't to see al-quaida driven before us on their knees or not? To do that we must shape the battle space. This involves lending populations at risk a helping hand to earn their trust when the going gets mucked up, that we'll be there for them as a freind.

(this is a combination of Apache Warrior-mindset and modern COIN doctrine in creating space for the three D's to be transformational to the general mind of populations.)

To defeat Al-quaida we must fight like Apache, not like Custer.

No retreat, no defeat. Choose your place and timing of the battle...and force capitulation.

How is it in the following statement you are not holding the people of Pakistan in the same regard as the taliban? We're talking about helping flood victims that are fighting endless muck, not us.

"Our country gives aid to Pakistan while they train terrorist to fight our own soldiers. This is complete madness. You don't give money to a country that helps the Taliban. Giving money to them will only cause more problems for our troops."

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 4, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

August 4th, 2010

@Eric in New Mexico

The United States Government can rescue victims, no question. The only thing that concerned me, was oversight in our Government to ensure the funds which are being sent to the Govt of Pakistan are being used for the intent purpose?

Bottom line - We all hope that the Taliban are captured or not allowed to enter Afghanistan, and we certainly do not want the country of Pakistan to be training these terrorists? Agreed?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 4, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Donald,

Well that's a lot different that saying Pakistanis are unworthy of US assistance and Leonard was pretty concice in his list of potential results. It was a fair assesment.

I was very specific in what I wrote back in 2002 about "individuals" in the ISI. This holds true then as it does today, and either folks @ State can appreciate what I'm saying now to address this, or it's going to remain hard to win this thing.

So for those who claim we can't afford to...I say we can't afford not to let folks know they can count on us when they're in the mucky muck.

I do appreciate your "lock and load" attitude Donald, let's just get the proper targeting parameters strait, shall we?

(chuckle).

Words have collateral damage potential as well as other ordenance..

donald m.
|
Virginia, USA
August 4, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

@Eric in New Mexico

We can agree that the new Government of Pakistan needs to take better Security Steps to ensure the border guards do not allow Taliban members to cross. We can agree that people of Pakistan that have nothing to do with the war or involved with terrorist activity are not targetted as collateral damage. The bottom line is billions of our tax dollars have been spent on this country, and we still have the highest terrorism in Pakistan.

I understand the State Department has a big heart. I also understand that people in Pakistan need help with the floods. What I will never understand is when we have terrorist that come from Pakistan, end up in our country trying to do harm to our people!!!

umar
|
Pakistan
August 16, 2010

Umar in Pakistan writes:

I appreciate the efforts maid by the Gov.of U.S.A & specially by the people of U.S.A for providing the technical & other assistance to flood affected areas & victoms.But I would like to say especially from the U.S.A gov. & establishment that in these critical conditions i.e war against terror & now the flood,the gov. of PAKISTAN desperately need some militry & transport helicopters for permanent bases & they should be CH-47 chinook,CH-53 super stallion,UH-60 black hawk, AH-64D apache, AH-1W super cobra & Bell412EP in near future as we desperately need these choopers both in war & in relief operations.I am optimistic that with these sincere steps,the image of the gov. of U.S.A in the minds of PAKISTANI people is positive for a long time because with this assistance to the troublesome & war,flood affected people of PAKISTAN,you won both heart & mind of the PAKISTANI people along with the PAKISTANI armed forces. I hope that I will hear this news in coming days.Thanks a lot with best regards.

farukh
|
Pakistan
October 29, 2010

Farukh in Pakistan writes:

how my country giving funds to people .they wants to kill all of people in Pakistan .we are angry on our rulers

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