How Can the U.S. Advance Partnerships With African Countries To Expand Democracy?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
July 23, 2010
African Union Session

During a recent Conference on sub-Saharan Africa, Secretary Clinton said, “[W]e have to join hands to work together to develop that partnership to expand democracy that delivers for people, good governance that actually can be accountable to the people, promoting sustainable economic growth that provides benefits to all people, improving access to health care, education, basic services, and working to eliminate the conflicts that destroy lives and destabilize the region.” Given that the 15th African Union (AU) Summit takes place July 19-27, 2010 in Kampala, Uganda…

How can the U.S. advance partnerships with African countries to expand democracy and support sustainable development?

Comments

Comments

Human R.
|
United States
July 24, 2010

H.R. in U.S.A. writes:

Take action that would promote human rights.

Dawn
|
Ohio, USA
July 24, 2010

Dawn in Ohio writes:

A good place to start to advance partnerships with African countries to expand democracy is to ask question. For example, how many cultures and co cultures live in a certain area? To expand democracy then we need to work with the groups that are eager to learn about democracy and we are eager to learn about their culture and co cultures. We are not only the teacher but we are also the student.

C. C.
|
Canada
July 24, 2010

Allan C. in Canada writes:

Much like infrastructure stimulus programs in Canada and the U.S., the U.S. and Canada can jointly provide interest-free loans and grants to build badly needed transport,energy, housing and health infrastructure in these countries. This support is of course tied to progressive democratic reform and may include supporting partnerships with U.S./Canadian government and businesses in developing infrastructure, governance and security.

Major carrot and stick!

Unlike current programs, there will be clear performance expectations and firm deadlines that are recognized and agreed to by all parties before any agreements are signed. Lack of clear progress should result in financial remedies/penalties to any/all parties involved.

Insurgency groups will be invited/encouraged to participate in democratic reform and nation-building or risk being isolated altogether. No agreements can be signed without the support of all groups.

These programs should be generous enough to have little or no downside and be difficult even for insurgents to resist and even if they do resist, will result in a severe loss of supporters.

No agreement, no money!

Mike
|
United States
July 24, 2010

Mike in U.S.A. writes:

That's an easy question with an easy answer. We should just give them a lot of money. As long as we have the capability to print endless amounts of money, why not do so? Who cares what may or may not happen down the road. Maybe other countries will like us more if we just give them more money--and that's what we want--to be liked by the rest of the world.

Rex H.
|
Oklahoma, USA
July 24, 2010

Rex H. in Oklahoma writes:

It is hard for Americans to believe that everyone does not want to be like Americans. This is illustrated by the number of Iraqis that do not like America or the West even though we "freed" them from one of history's worst tyrants. Such Iraqis are bad people or lesser human beings than Americans, they have simply lived for centuries with different customs from family to tribal to governmental levels. Such customs and beliefs will not change over night because John Wayne showed up on his handsome steed.

We must not dictate our ways, including democracy. We must befriend them, have open and equal dialogue, try to provide humanitarian assistance without being intrusive, and with patience, maybe they will see that we are not so bad and that we may even have some decent ideas.

deonna
|
Iowa, USA
July 24, 2010

Deonna in Iowa writes:

Women and children and a crew and backup helped by women and children with crew and backup ? ? ?

A+ ASK US !

Renzo C.
|
Florida, USA
July 24, 2010

Renzo C. in Florida writes:

Offer to reduce interest rates on international loans in exchange for governments creating monetary institutions that support basic civil rights. Reduce rates rather than forgiving debt numerically to ensure compliance; because if the country fails to act the rate can simply increase again.

For example:

Reduce US loan interest rate to Country A. Country has X amount of money saved. Negotiate with Country A so that 1/10 of the money they save on the interest payments is instead used to create an institution that functions similar to the National Endowment for the Arts in the US. However instead of promoting the arts this would help fund (by way of loans) new printing presses, radio stations, etc. The intention being obvious, ensure that the market place of ideas is less constrained by financial burdens. Encouraging freedom of the press in this example would open up more civil/public discourse, and help reformers.

This idea would work best in the more urban regions. Democratization in Africa has been treated as a developmental problem, this may not be the only approach the US should take.

chris m.
|
United States
July 24, 2010

Chris M. in U.S.A. writes:

Africa only needs one thing, when this is established Africa has all the necessary resources for its fulfillment. Africans need help in getting their votes to count or the ability to elect its political leaders chiefly its heads of states. It needs help with establishing fair electoral rules, election monitoring and votes counting. There's no better country than the United States of America to foster this crucial and desperately needed factor for the continent to move from stagnation to real progress. All multilateral instituions have greatly failed in this endeavor which is not surprising considering that most of the countries with veto powers in those institutions are the ones greatly benefiting from Africa's misery, particularly FRANCE, which appoints, supports, protects and helps to maintain tyrants as heads of states for decades so they can in turn sell to FRANCE Africa's natural resources and contracts at dirt cheap prices or given at bribe price. This is the cancer of Africa, specially of french speaking Africa, this for the past 75 years and counting. This is enough exploitation and it must stop Now.

Chris L.
|
Oregon, USA
July 24, 2010

Chris L. in Oregon writes:

Black markets and corrupt officials seem to be the biggest deterrents to improving the economies of Africa, which is key to spreading democracy.

A necessary feature of any of our interactions with Africa needs to be much the same goal as the Obama administration has called for often within the U.S.: transparency of government actions needs to start becoming a condition of our aid to many countries, while supporting populations and encouraging freedom of the press in order to try to bring this corruption to a halt through legal measures within the states which we are dealing with.

The black markets need to be taken down - or controlled at the least, for if shutting down the black markets leads to a loss of needed supplies to people then we cannot in good conscience destroy them. However, we can support the local governments in reducing black market premiums and keeping the wealth from siphoning into the hands of a few criminal overlords. With that and concerted efforts to improve unskilled labor opportunities within the states, the population should become wealthier, and therefore more empowered in addressing the flaws of their own governments.

Democracy is best achieved through a mandate from the people and a peaceful transfer, but the people need to be empowered and the corruption of the current system made clear in order to achieve these goals.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 25, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

1. AU serves ICC warrant for genocide on Bashir no matter where he is served by end of month. Any resistance by Sudanese gov. is deemed to be an act of war on all members of AU in their due process of law under the convention on the protection of populations UNGA 2005

2. AU matches by each member separately the total number of forces Uganda has devoted to date to fighting Al Sheebab in Somalia.

3. US devotes air and sea capabilities as needed to create unified command combined force structure in support of AU action in Somalia in all aspects of opperations. ROE agreed upon..."walk road of peace or rest in peace."

I'm sure folks can translate this into opperational jargon.

4. IMF /UN prepare logistics and funds to create UN protectorate in Somalia in support and coordination of transitional government and the civilian, ngo, and private sector involvement in all aspects of interaction with Somali people in reconstruction, agriculture, refugee issues in surrounding areas and return as conditions permit. Reconciliation, reintegration issues on hold while fighting lasts, with lots of disincentives to continue conflict inserted in the meantime, by force.

Peace from scratch folks...that's what awaits the success of your efforts together.

You do this right, you'll all be hero's and lift the boot from African potential for a better future.

5. All other nations currently on pirate patrol, commit and equal number of ground forces as to match each AU nation's forces in Somalia (minus US as providing close to that anyway in Air and Sea forces) creating COW (coalition of willing)- boy Diplomacy on international level and true understanding of meaning -"leading heards to greener pastures and mending fences along the way." includes forming a posse occasionally as a "given".

Terrorists will love my brand of "Cowboy logic." or take a dirt nap.

I'm sure Aminidijad will hear me now....(chuckle) Withdraw your terrorists from Africa, they arn't safe anywhere there. Stop flying them around for free on Majan airlines.

( cut all aviation to and from Iran globally unless he complies immediately with this and all other demands of the international community)

You want terrorists isolated, cancel their tickets to fly.

David S.
July 25, 2010

David S. writes:

Private sector development.

Many young Africans are now being educated, into high school, but have nowhere to go upon completing their studies. In rural areas, sustenance farming remains compulsory given the lack of workload-reducing technologies and electricity. In more urban zones, many try the entrepreneurial route, but are limited to small commercial activities.

The lucky few who go to college are pulled into the public sector, working for bureaucratic agencies or ministries and rarely fostering job creation for their fellow citizens.

U.S. support of private sector initiatives can drive the growth of these stagnating economies and thus, create freer governments where more and more people have a say in their country's democratic process. This can be done via funding and support for entrepreneurial camps and formal business education, working with the legal system to clear up red tape for aspiring entrepreneurs, and improving the infrastructure that supports commercial activity (utilities, transport, internet speeds, etc).

However, as an American that lived in West Africa for two years, I concur with the post that cautioned we must not assume all countries want to be like the U.S. While Americans can play an active role in Africa's economic and democratic growth, Africans must develop their own solutions, those tempered within their own culture and environment, for this development to stick.

Lauren W.
|
Utah, USA
July 26, 2010

Lauren W. in Utah writes:

I strongly believe that the greatest way to spread democracy to any nation is through greater opportunities for higher education.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
July 26, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

"How"? Define priorities then find the means to implement all these good ideas.

I agree with Lauren W. that education is key, and I guess it goes without saying that this education occures simulaneously on many levels besides the classroom.

There's this huge laboratoty called "the great experiment" going on outside.

(chuckle).

Some may never think of the words in a song, "School's out for the summer!" the same way again.

Ogoubi w.
|
Togo
July 26, 2010

Dr. Ogoubi K.W. in Togo writes:

In order to find the best answer to this very important question, let's answer first how the african armies can demonstrate their interest for other citizen's freedoms and the way to expand Democracy will be easy and very large.

palgye
|
South Korea
July 27, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Kenya, South Africa,
intensively developed as a role model for neighboring countries to develop, while thought to be go. The first drinking water, while addressing mulmunje the need to convince them I think. I crave the same situation occurs in the side effect of democracy only when forced to think. While the development of basic industries in the area or areas suitable for underground resources and to attract industry, I think.

and- Using solar power and renewable energy industries in Africa and the developed countries, if you think she's still a lot to help.

The entire continent of Africa for new energy and impetus needed to think.

Thank You.

Tukam D.
|
Uganda
July 28, 2010

Tukam D. in Uganda writes:

“[W]e have to join hands to work together to develop that partnership to expand democracy that delivers for people, good governance that actually can be accountable to the people, promoting sustainable economic growth that provides benefits to all people, improving access to health care, education, basic services, and working to eliminate the conflicts that destroy lives and destabilize the region.”

The song has been like that for so long, I could quote you countless quotations from high profile figures in USA. All with one goal-depleting the continent!

If USAmerica cant learn today and live by letting others live unconditionally-WORD, then you are totally worthless.
This is an African Unity Affair not United States of America. I cant seem to see Africans politicking with in American circles. They do not!

tdk,

AFRIKA.

palgye
|
South Korea
July 29, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Libya...

North Africa to develop a particular country to be a role model, the introduction of democracy before the doctor or the capitalist nature of the transitional and combined with the economic development of the country to see you think there is a significant effect. There's a rite of passage, but,

Libya has seen at least think, solve water problem, there is a significant effect. The problem is terrorism, these days he keeps distorts efforts to get along with someone's help anyone think that that is not required.

Not Deep concern, but are going to. There's nothing I can do (even saenggipnida jagoegam shameful. Because there's little things you can not) do with Africa's water problem in Africa is considered the beginning of the development.

cui? Is the past tense?

Thank You.

Many local people still think that it is much more conservative.

.

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