How Can U.S. Highlight Needs of Refugees To Promote Commitment From International Community?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
June 19, 2010
Refugees Line Up With Containers By Water Pump South of Darfur

June 20 marks World Refugee Day. Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration Eric P. Schwartz said, "World Refugee Day...is an international commemoration designed to highlight the needs of refugees and vulnerable people, as well as to promote sustained commitment to international humanitarian response."How can U.S. foreign policy highlight the needs of refugees to promote commitment from the international community?

Comments

Comments

palgye
|
South Korea
June 19, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

International opinion about these, or do you think I know the answer?
NEVER.....

but,
Perhaps all the international attention ostensibly at least provoke a regional conflict, because the internal problems, was not bring hidden, problems, small problems grow into an international conflict is likely suspect. Another problem of the other places at the same time you think that is likely to occur at. Therefore, a huge one organization a lot of problems to solve the many problems likely to occur large, the prepped a small multiple of the organization in preparation that have it, - the fire system like the same equipment and personnel with the TF timcheoreom - problems If you put in there how to create a system that I think.

P.S
If, will join me as I was thinking very well. Region quo, non-profit yimyeonseo be approved by the world to respond positively after a dispute in the system ...... TF system.

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 19, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

The U.S should just forge ahead with development and massive structural changes to education and the world will follow. "Build it and they will come" should be our development mantra. Stop viewing everything as a profit model and view it as a human interaction model and the world will change and get very busy. Not everything can be quantified in dollars. Interaction through trade and idea sharing is very powerful and money is a natural consequence of it. Activity for the world, activity for all Americans. Busibodies on every street corner. Activity for all to see and join in.

ChiuNainDzu
|
Taiwan
June 21, 2010

CND in Taiwan writes:

Red carpet, the Ambassador Hotel, police clear the way, governor of the Mayor Quan Pei, considerate beautiful translation, three meals a day banquet, airline first-class, Qianhuhouyong the bag and, security ... ... In recent years, some Western politicians visit to China by the "emperor-like treatment", the latter came back against the idea of democracy and freedom over the past insisted on the "China model" much appreciated, and the Chinese Communists at every step and on sensitive topics such as Tibet, dissidents, Falun Gong and the persecution human rights "remained silent."

Analysts said surging because of China's human rights movement, the communist regime at risk, so to intensify the corrosion win over politicians in democratic countries and businesses, and spared the Olympic Games, World Expo and other surface engineering, has confused the illusion that the people of the PRC, but " red carpet" is a dangerous under the trap, once sold the soul of the Chinese Communists dragged into the water, will face utterly discredited. Today, the world's Propaganda Department can say no far the most abusive terms against whom? To six years, and actually dared to the "Nine Commentaries" anything about this incident a word - a quasi-mouth disabled!

Recommends that all do not want associating with the devil, and he may be the Chinese Communists on the red carpet of the foreigner cited in the national first read the "Nine Commentaries" again. She can before you set foot on this magic carpet, protecting your integrity and good living. Mr. Harper, Canada, Germany, Ms. Angela Merkel, the United States several hundred members, who have been to China, and some head still ringing salute, but did not fall into the abyss below the Red Devils blanket.

palgye
|
South Korea
June 21, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

one year ago and now, China.

China's pride to think we had the possibility I think. In order to derive the strength and softness, as a result of moving more'll get over it.

Rather than raise interest rates a bit more flexible exchange rate policy for a better policy, I think. If you encounter problems about the impact of interest rate hikes matahyahaneungeogo rain without an umbrella severe cough developed into pneumonia, severe pneumonia and death will lead to Think. However, the yuan rise is still in space can be modified at any time and compromise with other countries see China as part of the damages can be considered for the replacement. Pride is a little dachigetjiman, incorrect interest rates on the economy by adding to the difficulties,

It is difficult to believe the United States alone. If you have any objections, even now, you can launch. The result is a very wonder.

In favor of the Chinese yuan appreciation, but a different story to tell you how to think. However, the Chinese internal and (in particular, the real estate market? Significantly compromised, are trying to.) Externally What do you expect to provide more free space. Especially politically ....

P.S However, the hidden powers That's great.

- me too, Poland?(it takes so long time, need. if, i`m not lost before election. but, i`m now-ing looser)

palgye
|
South Korea
June 21, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Joint Resolution. (Is absolutely in favor.)

Joint Resolution is great, but economic sanctions would lead to a collapse of North Korea is expected. Substantive negotiations as a means of economic sanctions did present a threat as a means to stay I think. North Korea's unconditional apology and publicly display (it happens now is important to us than the truth we impose the reality I think is a stretch.) Should be opened to the outside world I think. North Korea has been preparing for the opening idea, which ever we have been able to prepare for the collapse of North Korea? China does not welcome, never.

The punishment should be. In return broke a rule, however, transfer to the North side of our furthur? Internally, I do not know what happened, but I think the best way to peace. Still, if possible ..........

Donald M.
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2010

Donald M. in Virginia writes:

6 20 10

Its like anything, you can help others by teaching them what they can do to help themselves. Teach them to plant gardens, or how to raise livestock, show them how to build homes, and get them involved in making it happen. Just showing up with aid will not solve the crisis. The will need development, but it should come from them, they should take an interest to make their lives better, to live better, and then they will prosper. Why should people prosper on eating if there not prepared to go out and work for it. You have to be willing to do something, make something, or grow something that helps your family.

Earth wind fire and water the elements of life can help people. In this heat is always good to remember to stay cool, drink plenty of cold water. People who do not have air conditioning this time of year, can place ice in bags, or ice in hands to keep the blood cooled off, stay out of the direct heat.

palgye
|
South Korea
June 21, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Would approach even as first proposed the denial of a visitor who hadaga impossible in reality - the action is repeated so many times, if not memory and shame - to show what confidence do you think? Meanwhile, the expression can not be suffered humiliation and shame I think. Besides, to my family ... I think they need to get you to want to do something through me, the person harassing the process of getting a normal life becomes impossible to prevent people to come next is hard to believe if you are going to continue. Congress, think, it will have to move. And investment to get to similar thought.

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S. writes:

Bringing trade and development down to the poorest classes and not just the rich,chosen few would multiply transactions exponentially. That is why education is invaluable because people begin to imagine themselves in a different circumstance and start to change their life to fit their dream. An excellent, comprehensive education is the best foreign policy because it changes societies in such a fundamental way. America has an adequate system of education that could be improved, marketed and expanded to reach the world's millions. This is where emphasis should be placed on a massive scale. Partnerships are very valuable but quicker change and trade would occur through a massive education network because it would immediately improve people's knowledge base which would have a resulting impact on their lives.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Palgye,

If S. Korea and China were to have an understanding that any and all refugees from want and fear coming from N. Korea would have safe, legal, humanitarian transit through China to S. Korea, in five years the Korean people will be reunified by voting with their feet, and 'lil Kim can be "President for Life" of the new Ponyang ghost-town, in a land he's made not fit to live upon.

But then he's not long for the world so I think there's room for improvement in general in this outlook overall..

But do we have to wait for "natural causes" to feed starving millions?

I don't think so...

Folks talk of "isolating" regimes outside the international norms of behavior and international law as codified in UN resolutions and conventions on the rights of populations and the protection of same as a matter of international responsibility.

Well, "isolation ain't the way.." and governments are free to quote me when they come to the realization what happens when we give these regimes exactly what they want and need in order to fully repress their people by "isolating" governments.

There's years of observational analysis in this notion that should be self evident to everyone by gaging the results of dipolomatic efforts up to this point in time.

And for folks @ State reading this, one should not take this as criticism of diplomatic effort, but just as a statement of fact as another example of why "diplomacy never fails to fail, until it succeeds."

So may I respectfully suggest we use a "can-opener" policy instead?

This isn't about "economic incentive"...we've tried that. It has only served as further proof that these regimes (Iran, Burma, Sudan, the list here is incomplete), are not interested in becoming nations in good standing with the rest of the family of nations. They seek to isolate themselves, so what they do to their populations is "out of site, out of mind." from the rest of us.

A shift in strategic thinking is therefore mandated by circumstance and experience, and folks need to get busy figuring out what "regime replacement therapy" looks like, smells like, and tastes like throughout the "baking" process, and what kind of cake the people will gladly eat at the hands of the will of governments.

Well, we know what success looks like, but every cake is made differently.

Now the word "regime" can be used to describe a government or a process. I include both in the definition of "regime replacement therapy", as they are processes married at the hip in terms of joint effectiveness in practical applications.

When entire populations are held hostage to the whim of ethical infants, do we really serve that population's interests through "isolation" of its government?

The facts clearly suggest otherwise.

China is all about "maintaining stability". Ok fine, I'm down with that...but they've done a pretty lousy job given that 'lil Kim is threatening nuclear war on a weekly basis.

This too is fact, not criticism, as simply an understanding that China stands to lose more than just "face" and risk embarrasment if this continues much longer.

What I'm contemplating is a policy of pro-active refugee status reform that causes the entire N. Korean army as well as civilians to defect towards a better life.

The only economic incentive proposed here is on an individual basis for N. Koreans, not its government.

But they have to leave home to find it.

In any hostage situation, the first priority is to separate the hostages from the abductor, then you can take the shot if one must.

The lesson to be learned by nations in resolving this to the lasting satisfaction of populations at risk, is in the knowing how to prevent tyrants from coming to power to begin with, and if they manage to do so to remove them before they become genocidal maniacs seeking weapons of mass destruction, and weilding starvation as one for repressive, life-threatening political control over populations.

I think the moral duty to one's fellow human is universally accepted by the civilized world.

It's what makes humanity "civilized" ever since our distant ancestors started taking care of the elderly and infirm within social groupings of families some 200,000 years ago.

Yet here we are once again in the process of determining the value of human life, on the international stage.

So please forgive this talking monkey for butting in on this dire conundrum, but it seems we have a choice between chaos, and managed instability.

How we cool-ectively manage to process instability created by tyrany will be the primary internationally sanctioned good samaritan act of the 21st century.

It's far too easy to predict the outcome of the alternative to excercising collective international will to resolve these problems permanently.

For "Without stability, nothing can be built."
-Hamid Karzai

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

In terms of garnering support from others, the emphasis should be more on information development rather than cold, hard cash support. An educational model based mostly on online courses and degrees is very inexpensive and can serve an unlimited number of people. To the drug dealer living in Khazakhstan a free online, certified, series of courses in fixing Harley Davidson motorcycles and owning a small business might just be the impetus he needs to quit drug dealing and open up a motorcycle shop. Making education inexpensive and widely accessible to everyone is how to get people interested in their own lives so they're not trying to run their neighbor out of town. The key is positive activity multiplied on a massive scale. Also keeping men occupied between the ages of 15-48 would help too. They're busy tinkering with motorcycle parts and engines not bomb parts.
In Afghanistan, having training sessions in many secure locations with various old engines would allow men to tinker and learn about different engines. This would satisfy a need and desire of a lot of Afghani men who want to open up their own shops. If you put them on a long course of engine mechanics that started from vacuum cleaners to truck engines it would occupy their time and get their mind off of destroying the infidel. Education preoccupies people with their interest and time. I don't understand why its not used as a cornerstone in foreign policy.

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

From State.gov:

"How many Iraqi refugees are there?
The UN High Commissioner for Refugees estimates there are now over two million Iraqis who have fled their homes for other countries. About ten percent of these refugees have registered with UNHCR, the necessary first step for resettlement. A fraction of this group has applied for resettlement.

This number does not include the estimated 2.8 million Iraqis displaced within Iraq (internally displaced persons)."

I think the question is not how the U.S. can "highlight needs of refugees." I think the U.S. can get commitment from the international community by not creating refugees in the first place and trying even harder than it presently is to find present refugees a way back home or, if that is not possible, a new home.

Let's not have to invoke the "pottery barn rule" again.

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

@Flavius,
What, pray tell is the "pottery barn rule"?

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Yeah Eric,
I like your can opener approach. Why aren't we inviting L'il Kim to the Las Vegas trade show too?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Author's "Point of Clarification" on the following;

"Now the word "regime" can be used to describe a government or a process. I include both in the definition of "regime replacement therapy", as they are processes married at the hip in terms of joint effectiveness in practical applications."

There are many manifestations of the above...one that folks can redily find living proof of is in how America goes through "regime replacement therapy" every election.

We've turned it into an institution.

On a more somber note, our friends among our former enemies can attest to magnamity in our victory over ideological stupidity.

Apparently we as a nation have made it our buisiness to change people's minds for centuries since folks have long incorrectly predicted our demise as a social experiment.

There's a statue in New York harbor that attests to this and shines a bright light on proper international refugee policy on a global level.

You'd think the UN member states would take some inspiration in it. Look where it got us today.

Everyone in North America is a either a refugee from somewhere, or the decendant of one. As far back as the population migration across the Bering strait thousands of years ago.

That is our traditional, historic, "immigration policy".

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Flavius,

Your premis seems to be based on America creating these refugees, which is opperationally incorrect.

There were refugees before Saddan fell, and the refugees and displaced persons created after his fall was as a direct result of Iran and Syria's actions in a joint effort with al-quaida to create ethnic conflict inside Iraq and , and we eventually put a screaching halt in large part to those malign efforts.

So get your facts strait, it was broke when we got there and they own it now as they did then. But now Iraqi's have the chance to fix it.

That too is "regime replacement therapy".

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

In regard to Afghanistan, getting everyone busy in gaining education through online certification or other methods and using massive education as the substrate to promote change in Afghanistan would eventually, marginalize Karzai. Education and change would become the new leader in Afghanistan. Eventually the market forces of trade would marginalize more extreme elements of the government. Education and development can transform a society but not in the slow, molasses sort of way that it's presently being deployed. Where's the development Calvary? Where's the All Hands On Deck? Think a million ants building, learning, growing. Success in Afghanistan can be achieved if there's a will to do it.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

"Yeah Eric,
I like your can opener approach. Why aren't we inviting L'il Kim to the Las Vegas trade show too?"

@OC,

Either you didn't understand what I was suggesting, or you just plain forgot I have previously suggested 'lil Kim be invited to go duck hunting with a former V.P.

If my government isn't approving that, why on Earth would you even ask such a silly question?

No one will trade for his scalps anyway.

I'm talking about crafting true isolation of ethical infants when they are the only one's left in town.

Litterally.

It can be done, if we wish to make it so.
A government that loses control over its population ceases to function in any form.

It's called "brain-drain" on steroids, we're just facilitating what is already naturally occurring population migration in a more coordinated approach for a reasoned purpose.

To protect populations from out-of-control governments.

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

Pottery Barn Rule (as put forward by Secretary of State Colin Powell to President George W. Bush regarding the invasion of Iraq):

"You break it, you buy it."

There is, by the way, no such rule at The Pottery Barn. Or so they say. I do remember going to the Williamsburg Pottery Factory in Williamsburg VA when I was a kid and reading a sign that said that. I've been in countless knickknack shops that had signs that read the same.

The easiest way to avoid these problems is not to create them in the first place.

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

Not even going to respond to that malarkey Eric. Pontificate all you want. It won't change the facts.

I know you'll go on for another twenty thousand words about how I'm full of it, but I don't have the patience for arguing with you. You never listen anyway.

OysterCracker
|
United States
June 21, 2010

O.C. in the U.S.A. writes:

Notice that Afghani's are complaining that they don't see enough change transforming their everyday lives. They are referring to the slow, molasses development approach. Where's the fast and hot American, Mc Donald's approach? Come on America! This is what we're about. Development on the cheap can't work when you're trying to build an empire. Why are we in Afghanistan if we can't make it work? We need to be committed or get out otherwise we're just straddling a fence, uncomitted to either reality.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Flavius,

You're entitled to your opinion, but not your own set of facts.

I take it you would prefer if I didn't offer twenty thousand words in reply, or would even appreciate any reply I might have to what you call "malarky".

I suppose I shouldn't disturb you in your ivory tower of blissful thinking anyway, despite your beggin' for the education.

But there's always Congressional testimony, and that's partly on public record, along with all the hard evidence put on public display by DOD over the years regarding "malign influence" and the Shitte/Suni cooperative terrorist connections. You don't need me to educate you in other words...you just have to want one.

So flail away with your insults Flavius, you got a lot to learn. I find your intellectual arrogence unbecoming to your intellectual capacity. I don't have the time to rip your blinders off, only you can do that and my trying would only be a waste of time.

I understand as I do precicely because I listen, Flavius...just not to you.

Don't take it so personally.

EJ

---

OC,

Afghan impatience is a good thing, it helps motivate them to build it themselves.

If it seems slow to you in process, remember that everyone involved has been doing this nation building thing from scratch.

When you consider it took 9 years to go from a desk, a chair, a pad of paper, a pencil and a telephone that worked occasionally, the timeline for standing up a functioning democraticly elected governmenmt that has taken its place in international fora and has now formed the backbone of its own nation's development efforts and soverign direction is about average in comparison with post ww2 Germany and Japan.

Thing is, those nations had infrastructure that could be rebuilt, and as such about the only infrastructure we arn't building from scratch is the irrigation system in Helmand province that the US helped build in the 1930's (If I heard that date correctly).

I think you are tempted to confuse exporting hope and a chance as a commercial venture.

Well, in some ways we are, but that's not why we went back to Afghanistan.

It was to have some compassion in the midst of our nation's wrath. Job's not done, but we do pretty good work as a people.

That's why 4 million refugees have returned home to Afghanistan.

They own it, always have. They do this for themselves and we're there to make sure it's done right, so we don't have these problems anymore.

And it takes time to get right, from get go.

If any of this were easy, it probably wouldn't be worthwhile.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@OC,

"Notice that Afghani's are...."

First lesson an Afghan friend ever taught me about his country was that Afghans are called Afghans, not "Afghanis", An "Afghani" is a unit of currency in the country.

I figure letting you know might save you an awkward moment if you happen to meet such friendly folk.

At least you'll know why they're laughing at you.

Best,

EJ

Mary D.
|
Kansas, USA
June 22, 2010

Mary G.D. in Kansas writes:

More documentaries and more newes coverage. American news is too exclusively focused on America. It's a big world out there but very small. People don't realize the impact their actions have on the planet and the greedy have too much power. People can't live without water. The Colorado River used to run all the way to the ocean. It dried up. More pollution than life in places in oceans, seas, lakes and now the Gulf of Mexico. I could go on but I'll spare you. Anything I can do to help, I am trying to so and it's challenging because every time I get behind the wheel of my car, I feel guilty. Good luck and God speed. <3

Sincerely,
MKG

palgye
|
South Korea
June 22, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Dear to

sorry, Somewhere to express my anger, and eventually came to be here. South Korea entered the World Cup Round of 16 today, can not restrain my anger and I think the day. Koreans rejoice the victory of Korea, but South Korea's Hyundai and sbs sponsor and support the political party Hannara to anger me.(and Myung-Bak, Lee)

And failed to kill me three times as disabled people and for my mother and father even threatened to kill the remaining people to sponsor a sports team than there is anything wrong like normal people and cheering like a look I restrain anger can not find how. For a more unjust to call my country several times, but the White House and State Department website to promote them more to create crazy. After promotion, he took kkeombeorideutyi If you are short of their ability harassing me, but .....

Everything you must admit it's a coincidence. However, the presence was not even me suddenly. I came to being a tragedy not even resistant, so there is no way to resolve anger. Many times the last two years I was trying to resolve all the way to mobilize. (I tried to find ways to compromise or formally
Could bring a friendly face working the other way to harass me.) Even while denying access to their endlessly harass. I do not know why this story was to do here.

I'm in Korea and Korean government denied the victims or the identity of the country do not have a will, Rather, I tried to help during times that I've tried .... Not seem to end their greed. Frank feels that South Korea's national soccer team has never come back from South Africa , will hope.

P.S Yuan revaluation of fun to see the world economy looks like the good judge. Be it the pride of the Chinese politician he promised a new economic renaissance seems to be. Pride in the face as a oriental feel is very important. (Oh, It's the story itself, I do not think is normal, but ..) (After reading it, I'd like removed. If you read, coming here is coming to my family that I do not think. The family is the last bastion ...)

palgye
|
South Korea
June 22, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

from a mad

I know it sounds silly, but democracy in Korea a little help to the doctor or the liberals I've lived with joy, when they re-strengthen the forces in Korea Having kicked out as the most sad to leave. From whom they dumped there, but the concern being admitted to the politicians and rulers, but became accessible to ordinary citizens should have accomplished something, even a minimal chance, they'm gone ... Is over. They dominate Korea pursues the logic of their theory starts strong, but people make poor countries seem to be going. It's called life is ruined anyway, and I wanted to come up if they are difficult bunch.

Football fierce internal conflict between the forces rather than to think it was. Officially, the war was Korea and the press people were watching, South Korea on the inside than the fox news media exist, but the reality is like a hidden cancer, I think.

and, Earthquake, flood, kidnapping, terrorism, hijacking, the world is to live a very dangerous world.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 23, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

"Lucky" the Ninja Turtle - A Refugee's Story;

Some weeks after his wild body surfing experience down the river in the spring run-off, and the pool he'd hung out in since now dry in the summer heat, "Lucky" was dredged up by a city front-end loader and dumped in a pile of dirt being removed for a river-side walkway (In general New Mexican rivers are like most people's idea of a stream that dries up.)

Lucky went into ninja mode before the other loader could feed him to the dumptruck, scuttled through traffic across the street and up the concrete driveway of the house across till he bumped up against the tire of the cash-for-clunker parked there.

Thus is how I came to meet the half-baked ninja turtle on a 95 degree Saturday afternoon, as I almost stepped on him getting into my 4x4.

Well I couldn't exactly drive off without making road-pizza, so I figued he'd be better off in the stone dish that catches rain from the roof, stuck him in it and filled it from the hose.

Well Lucky was definately diggin' the coolness of my bird-bath when I got back , but as much as I don't bat an eyelid to stray wildlife finding me, or seeking me out( I'll talk about the lost hive of bees I once reunited with its keeper another time), usually in dire straits, and in need of a helping hand or just a hand-out.

So after giving a description to a game and fish officer to verify he was a native species and not some lost kid's aquarium pet.

I hadn't seen one in 40 years here and figured it might be an endagered species, which considering his ninja adventurs, surely was.

After confirmation I drove him up-river a ways where it was still running, released him and he scuttled right on into the water, and is now a happy resident of one of our city parks.

It's not like Lucky is exactly "homeless" either, it goes where he goes.

Something for Chinese Diplomats to ponder when considering how to deal with a North Korean refugee crisis and granting safe passage to S. Korea.

Or any nation granting safe passage to populations for that matter.

palgye
|
South Korea
June 24, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Dear to.....

today
Owns the company, www.bobcat.com/ provides where you want to work has been financed with the money coming in here. But today, this story seems not a good day.

This company should you need to understand to be the company that will help them.
Thank You.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 24, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Indeed, if and when our President gets on his high horse and puts on his cowboy diplomat hat and states clearly,

"'Lil Kim, tear down this DMZ."

Then we'll know just the company to call to help them do it.

They'll be a lot of land-scraping involved getting rid of all the wire and landmines.

I suppose folks will have to up-armor those bobcats, but that can be done.

Zharkov
|
Brazil
June 24, 2010

Zharkov in Brazil writes:

Daniel Endres, Iraq representative for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, said the total number of internally diplaced persons (IDPs) in Iraq "officially" remained at 1.5 million.

But he acknowledged that that figure was out of date and could actually be lower as many had returned to their homes in the past two years.

"The number of IDPs in Iraq is 1.5 million, but of these 1.5 million, around 500,000 live in squatter camps," Endres said

Everyone now knows that government statistics rarely reveal the truth about a situation. Nearly 2 million Iraqi refugees currently live outside the country, and another 1.5 million are displaced within.

As bad conditions in Iraq continue, more are crossing borders. Jordan, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia are all seeing a rise in Iraqi refugees.

Syria in particular, which shares a 450-mile border with Iraq, is bearing the brunt of the mass exodus. Syrian officials estimated more than 700,000 Iraqis are now living inside their country.

According Faiza Al-Arji, who fled from Baghdad to Jordan with her family, help is not forthcoming.

She and her family keep a blog called "A Family in Baghdad". "Here, in expatriation and dispersal," she writes, "I have seen so many organizations, or heard about them. I spared no efforts to obtain some medical help for an Iraqi who was injured by shrapnel and burns, or to get some financial or material donations. But to no avail...All I found [were] lies and stalling."

For the majority, life in exile is a life of poverty. The United Nations reported that women are increasingly forced to resort to prostitution. Child labor has become a scourge. It also estimated that an additional 2.7 million would be internally displaced in Iraq this year. In Syria, more than 30 percent of Iraqi children are without schooling.

Elected and appointed officials of the US government have ruined Iraq and its society and culture. It wasn't pottery that they broke, it was Iraq's entire society, and human beings - in a small country so far away.

Was this war necessary? Most of Iraq's population doesn't think so. As a minimum, we owe them the courtesy of our departure at our earliest opportunity.

And what about the now-pointless occupation of Afghanistan? Has the Pentagon converted them into Christian-loving taxpayers yet?

How many Afghans must die before our soldiers are allowed to come home?

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
June 24, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

Zharkov! Are you daft? All those refugees were created by Saddam Hussein, Syria, Iran and Al Qaeda! Eric said so! And he's ALWAYS right, by his own admission!

Could it be that you are an ETHICAL INFANT?!!!

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