U.S. Role in Combating Human Trafficking

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
May 13, 2010

On May 12, 2010, at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC, Ambassador-at-Large Luis CdeBaca, Director of the Office To Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, spoke on the role of the United States in combating human trafficking. Ambassador CdeBaca said:

"The United States' mandate in combating trafficking is a long one but it is a simple one: we must deploy every tool at our disposal in a strategic and coordinated fashion. We must tackle every form of this crime -- whether it has been labeled peonage, involuntary servitude, sex trafficking, or debt bondage.

"We cannot focus on one form of trafficking over another if we truly want to end this crime. And, we ought to broaden our efforts to ensure that every man, woman, and child is able to pursue, and achieve, his or her God-given potential.

"Translating the fight against modern slavery into 21st Century foreign policy is essential. It cross-cuts and impacts so many policy concerns; it is a fluid phenomenon that responds to market demands, vulnerabilities in laws, weak penalties, natural disasters, economic and environmental instability.

"What we're really talking about are the shadows: traffickers operate in the shadows and they take advantage of zones of impunity no matter why those zones exist. So, our global response must has to not just be to catch and punish those that we can find; we have to destroy their safe havens by fighting for rule of law, security, and economic empowerment."

Read Ambassador CdeBaca's full remarks here.

Related Entry:Making Real Progress Against Modern Slavery

Comments

Comments

OysterCracker
|
United States
May 13, 2010

O.C. in U.S.A. writes:

More attention on the Russian Mafia, especially in Los Angeles. More attention on Israeli connections to human smugggling. Use citizenship as bait to crack smuggling rings. Illegals have a lot of knowledge where these rings operate and who the players are. Why aren't they used? Americans believe that the government is complicit due to their laissez faire attitude towards immigration.

OysterCracker
|
United States
May 13, 2010

O.C. in U.S.A. writes:

Confiscate multinational banks that launder drug profits.

palgye
|
South Korea
May 13, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

just like a women of Afghan, from Korea attends with invitation of the agency which is authority of the foreign nation when and position of that person the eminent degree suddenly, rises. Then, the place which invites is a charge but the person who is invited when goes back, what kind of conduct the description below considerably comes to be easy, is thinking the act which collects what kind of thing possibly becomes. The avarice which is personal is, but, now that is important, thinks our all desire. (The people whom until now tries to meet minimum open to the public thinks that expresses an intimate feeling about the United States. that)

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
May 14, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

Fabulous. We can begin AT HOME.

OysterCracker
|
United States
May 14, 2010

O.C. in U.S.A. writes:

@ Palgye,

You make interesting comments that are difficult to understand. Can you please write small sentences and then link them together like: Afghani women want freedom. They want education. America can invest in women's future......Writing smaller sentences will make your comments easier to understand.

.

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