U.S. Special Envoy Travels to Sudan and Ethiopia

Posted by Scott Gration
April 30, 2010

About the Author: Major General (Ret) Scott Gration serves as the President's Special Envoy to Sudan.

Hello, I'm Scott Gration, the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan. This week I'm heading out on my next visit to the region -- to Sudan and Ethiopia. Let me take a few minutes to share some of our objectives with you.

Two weeks ago, Sudan held its first multiparty elections in 24 years. While we have expressed our concerns about the elections and the electoral environment, we recognize these elections are an important element of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. We're continuing our efforts to fully implement the CPA, including next year's referenda in Abyei and Southern Sudan.

On this trip, I will stop in Khartoum where I will meet with top officials of the United Nations and other special envoys from Russia, China, the United Kingdom, France, and the European Union.

I will also travel to Juba for continued discussions with members of the Sudan People's Liberation Movement and leaders of the Government of Southern Sudan. We will discuss the unresolved issues of the CPA, like border demarcation and popular consultations. We will also talk about the post-referenda matters, such as oil revenues, citizenship, and grazing rights.

My trip will take me back to Darfur to discuss the security situation on the ground with UNAMID officials in El Fashir.

Finally, I'm heading to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia to participate in an African Union ministerial on Sudan. While there, I will meet with key African leaders and multilateral organizations to discuss regional strategies and to coordinate international support.

I look forward to giving you an update upon my return. Thank you for your continued interest in the work of our office. We appreciate your concern for the peace, prosperity and future of the Sudanese people. Thank you.

Comments

Comments

Benjamin
|
Japan
May 2, 2010

Benjamin in Japan writes:

Obviously an election whether the voting was rigged or not is a good sign for future political development in Sudan. I'm sure many readers are interested in the consultations to be held with the Liberation Movement and The Government of Southern Sudan. It would be interesting to read more about their perspectives and future plans.

Mark H.
|
Tennessee, USA
May 3, 2010

Mark H. in Tennessee writes:

Free and fair elections were an important part of the CPA. Sham elections that took place were not. Thanks for setting Sudan up for conflict and wasting US tax-paying dollars.

Susan M.
|
California, USA
May 3, 2010

susan M. in California writes:

General Gration,

The Obama administration's announced policy on Sudan was based on periodic, objective assessments of the situation on the ground. Yet, in spite of very concerning developments on the ground, including ongoing government-sponsored bombings in Darfur, the administration has not held any of the parties to account for their actions. In the six months since President Obama’s Sudan policy went into effect there has been no demonstrable progress towards peace, security, or justice in Sudan. It’s time for the administration to back its words with deeds and increase the pressure on all parties, especially the NCP which is acting with impunity, to end the conflict in Darfur, ensure a peaceful referendum for the South, and advance democracy and human rights throughout Sudan.

Katie-Jay S.
|
California, USA
May 2, 2010

Katie-Jay S. in California writes:

Last October, the U.S. unveiled its Sudan Policy. And although it has been kept highly confidential, it was said that the U.S. would apply pressures and consequences if benchmarks were not met. Clearly, having a free and fair election is a benchmark. Clearly, this did not happen. With all the evidence that the people's vote was stolen, is our government, are you, going to recognize and congratulate an indicted war criminal, who used voter fraud, intimidation, and worse to legitimize his regime? I call on you to stand up for what is right for the people of Sudan, not the ruling party of Sudan. You must apply the consequences set forth in our Policy.

Mohamed S.
|
California, USA
May 2, 2010

Mohamed S. in California writes:

General Gration,

There are news of renewed aerial bombings in Darfur by the Albashir's government. There are reports of casualties (children and women). What are you going to tell the officials in Khartoum?

Elizabeth B.
|
Oregon, USA
May 2, 2010

Elizabeth B in Oregon writes:

General Gration,

Do you honestly believe that legitimizing an indicted war criminal and sanctioning an ongoing genocide is an appropriate policy expression on behalf of the American People? Is there a war crime, or a crime against humanity, that is a bridge too far for you to legitimize? Also, please request President Obama to make a clear statement and take real action before this policy undermines America's standing as a beacon of freedom.

Jessica Q.
|
Arizona, USA
May 2, 2010

Jessica Q. in Arizona writes:

Major Gen. Gration,

You write "While we have expressed our concerns about the elections and the electoral environment, we recognize these elections are an important element of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement." Fair and unbiased elections would help the CPA - not fraud-ridden elections to keep a man accused of genocide and crimes against humanity in power. The “elections” that took place are NOT an important element of the CPA. I’m completely in favor of diplomacy as the first step in dealing with foreign governments but you must realize that this is not working. I know you have good intentions- put them finally into ACTION! We’ve stood idly by for far too long.

Martina K.
|
California, USA
May 2, 2010

Martina K. in California writes:

General Gration - Please see the Washington Post editorial of May 2 urging the Obama Administration not to legitimize al-Bashir unless he comes through on his post-election promises and to be "ready to respond" when he does not.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/05/01/AR201005...

Please make sure the U.S. is ready to respond.

Nell O.
|
Connecticut, USA
May 3, 2010

Nell O. in Connecticut writes:

Now that what human rights groups have been telling you for years has come to pass, do you feel inspired to listen to them and heed their advice? Is it oil that keeps this administration from standing up for the people of Darfur, indeed, for all of Sudan???

palgye
|
South Korea
May 3, 2010

Palgye in South Korea writes:

@ For rain man at the gulf:

Thinks the large counter-attack of finance was started. Is the anxiety disappears but, who about isolation operation like that to use the method which does and, thinks that conducts an attack. He hangs and the frame phosphorus thinks that. But, must think now, hangs, the fact that will lose and with the fact that we will get to make break through, judges the front does unionizes the adherents and thinks that until election must maintain clean image. Is incorrect to not to be, rightly catches a frame phosphorus part thinks in the rich men who are caught alive in the longstanding practice the effort of the people who endeavors seemed funny. Thinks that must assist. The small kindling catches with the fire extinguisher and thinks that. fire machine is not a necessity, .typicalty where thinks that.

and
P.S
The leader of North Korea toward China is saw a news. When speaks shortly,
"Grand Bargain" necessity are think. Is actualized and is open to the public and is supported. Is busy is sorry. Also China does charge be, North Korea must overcome a criticism public opinion how about missile export for the Republic of Korea to do with subject of direct interchange?

Continuously will come frequently. Defined how about me. from dremer.

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