How Can the U.S. Strengthen Global Efforts To Stop the Spread of Nuclear Weapons?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
April 6, 2010
IAEA Board of Governors Meeting in Vienna

U.S. President Obama and Russian President Medvedev are expected to sign a new START Treaty this month. This treaty will represent the most comprehensive arms control treaty in nearly two decades. By signing this agreement, the two largest nuclear powers in the world may send a clear signal to bolster global arms control efforts. President Obama will host the Nuclear Security Summit April 12-13, and the Nuclear Nonproliferation Review Conference begins at the United Nations Headquarters in May.

How can the U.S. strengthen global efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons?

Comments

Comments

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 12, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Joe,

You have your invitation to think that I provided and folks do a pretty good job of discrediting themselves without my help.

On the other hand, it seems for all intents and purposes that I can step into the loop univited any time I wish, it's just that all hell breaks loose everytime I get a think tank like CSIS to think, or folks @ State and the Whitehouse passed around a letter written 8 days after 9/11 after a week long conversation with a member of the Afghan royal family. Or when the CIA buys me lunch at the "strong suggestion" of my senior senator's office, and then tells me to "keep it coming."

I gather this was because I wasn't wasting anyone's time for all the thanks I've gotten and results observed.

I don't suppose you know what it takes for an American to earn the trust of Iranian dissidents to such an extent that they asked me to help them have a voice in the matter with the US gov. but I can assure you their thoughts were read on the floor of the house in passing the Iran Freedom and Support Act.

Never mind the fact that today over 40 country's are gathered on American soil discussing something I said to President Clinton the day before he first became president-elect long ago.

On the flyleaf of a book about Los Alamos, that I gave to him;

"This is a slice of times past, to give perspective on the present, so that in the future we can eliminate the threat of nuclear war. The greatest threat we face today is that terrorists will obtain nuclear weapons."

Unlike Jack the "Super Patriot" wannabe revolutionary-taco shy of a combination plate-loony-toon cartoon character, I'm not doing what I'm doing for the money or the ego, Joe. It's a "dad thing" for the kids, always has been.

It's interesting that the last two President's share having two daughters in common with me, and bein' that they've incorperated my words into the loop, I have no doubt they not only know what I'm talking about, but that they both share my opinion that not only is it a "dad thing" but far beyond anything mearly political in that realization.

As you say...

"The various US Intelligence Services uses a multitude of people of all talents and backgrounds..."

As far as free advice is concerned, could be worthless, could be priceless. Mine just tends to fall somewhere in between.

And that is what it is, I'm just looking for results.

Looks like I got some, how 'bout you?

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 12, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Authors note:

"univited" (Pronounced) uni-vited.

Compound abbreviation meaning "universe-aly invited"

Generally used in context with "to think" when used in context with interactions between people and people in government.

Contextual application-IE;

"On the other hand, it seems for all intents and purposes that I can step into the loop univited any time I wish..."

As I said in a recent post, we haven't invented all the lexicon yet to address these grave issues facing humanity.

A good marketer always tests theory before product. Thus an invitation to think carries with it a certain hypothetical, and that involves a horse being led to water.

Ergo Dipnote.

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
April 13, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

It is bad form to attack arguments by questioning credentials. The arguments stand or fall on their own. If an idiot speaks the truth, it remains the truth.

It is also bad form for people to support their arguments by name dropping. You should not need your supposed associations with other people to support your arguments (or your self worth).

These tactics are especially deplorable on a blog, where the ability to prove or disprove such attacks or claims is dubious at best. This is the official blog of the United States Department of State. One would hope standards would be higher here.

Please stop the ad hominem NOW.

OysterCracker
|
United States
April 13, 2010

Oyster C. in U.S.A. writes:

If people are really busy making money in their community they wouldn't be thinking about obtaining nuclear material to blow up America. In any case, the government should be concentrating on higher educated, income terrorists who would have the connections to these materials and underpaid government employees who might sell them for profit.

If people had hope for their future, if they saw development changing their lives in a positive way, they would marginalize the Taliban because the Taliban don't have the resources and cohesive plan to drastically change lives for the better. Places like Pakistan and Yemen should have great schools so that no one would want to attend the local madrassa. When people are involved in their own succesfull life they have little desire to dream someone else's apocalyptic dream. This philosophy should be emphasized too!

America should be very concerned with its huge bored, unemployed underclass. Get people working and busy and they won't have time to dream of inventive ways to destroy America.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 13, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Flavius,

So when you said this to me...,

"Pass on my regards to Mr. Abrams, Mr. Krauthammer, Mr. Wolfowitz and Vice President Cheney, if you would."

Was that "name dropping" to "attack arguments by questioning credentials" (mine), by "supposed associations with other people to support your arguments (or your self worth)." ????

I think if I remember correctly that I responded, "Don't be silly, I've already suggested that an invitation to go duck hunting might straiten out 'Lil Kim's attitude."

And that it wasn't a partisan issue, just my brand of humor.

Now, as I said to Joe, folks do a pretty good job of discrediting themselves without my help, but please don't try and play the moralistic pollyanna on this blog.

I'm trying to excercise some "legendary patience" as it is (chuckle).

Thanks,

EJ

OysterCracker
|
United States
April 15, 2010

Oyster C. in U.S.A. writes:

Empress Flavius,

There you go again stirring up the "Foggy Bottom".

OysterCracker
|
United States
April 14, 2010

Oyster C. in U.S.A. writes:

Thank you SNP from Syria. So well expressed. It is disturbing and downright unconscionable that the USA holds up the banner of freedom, democracy and apple pie then allows foreign terrorists to traffic women, children and all manner of reprehensible un American things then allows Mafia terrorists free reign to plunder and exploit our institutions. They've infiltrated the economy, health system and college institutions. What next, The state Department? Beware of friendly spies they have sticky thorns.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 26, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

'Onward through the fog...my good Oyster. (ROFLMAO)

From: "Mark S."
To: (Eric in New Mexico)
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2001 2:26 PM
Subject: Re: binLadin/Islamic "Jim Jones"???

> Mr. (deleted for posting),
>> Thank you for your e-mail. I'm in the CSIS press office, but I'll see if I can forward your input to someone in one of our substantive programs.
>> Thank you for writing.
>> Mark S.
> CSIS
----
I've always felt that the attacks of 9/11 were intended to trigger our response in such a way as to discredit this nation through the method of our response. In this case, Bin Laden was hoping we'd nuke his training camps and give him his holy war. But the scenario that CSIS passed on was about how he could make it look like we did while we used conventionally tipped cruise missiles, by detonating one in proximity to a conventional strike on his camps. It wasn't long after I got this that DOD said they were "running low" on them and stopped using them in theater.

Three Pakistani nuclear scientists were caught running up into the hills to help bin Laden with "something", and not long after he publicly claimed to have a nuke. I don't know if you or anyone else posting comment paid attention to Mr. Bremmer's talk at the nuclear security summit, but I found it interesting indeed. I would simply suggest that there's probably a good reason we dumped more tonnage of bombs on Tora Bora than all of Germany in WW2. ( heard this statistic somewhere, but I can't recall which official cited the comparision.) Make one wonder just how close we came to having nuclear terrorism become stark reality.

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
April 15, 2010

Flavius in Virginia writes:

@ Oyster, if you're going to give me an honorific, I would prefer that it be more appropriate to my gender. I'm a republican (small r) at heart, so if your going to add anything to "Flavius," I'd prefer you just went with "Citizen."

As far as my stirring up "the Foggy Bottom," I appreciate your sentiment. I should know better than to stir up "the Foggy Bottom." All that happens when you stir fog is that it goes round and round but ends up in exactly the same place.

I just need to let nature take it's course and let the sun burn it off.

Unless we have NUCLEAR WINTER, of course.

OysterCracker
|
United States
April 15, 2010

Oyster C. in U.S.A. writes:

Citizen Flavius,

Touche. Tres Bien. You got me. Thanks for the good laugh.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 26, 2010

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ O.C., Re; "When people are involved in their own succesfull life they have little desire to dream someone else's apocalyptic dream." I think you'll enjoy this; alluc.org/movies/watch-afghan-star-2009-online/186401.html?maincatid=171297|documentary

Where it concerns the question of the week, and your truism above, I think this documentary captures mindsets in the process of evolution. Music sooths the savage beast and Afghanistan is is in process of rediscovering itself. It's only rock and roll, but I think they like it. And you'll see resistance to change in the generational challenge of the old giving way to the new generation.

Such is the case with any renaissance. Onward through the fog.... "Stir it up...little darling,...stir it up"..." We keep coming back to the same place because folks have a need to keep relearning lessons from history. Often times the hard way.

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