What Innovative Things Can We Do To Assist Haiti in Relief Efforts?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
January 16, 2010
Rescuer Carries Child After Haiti Earthquake

The United States is committed to a swift, coordinated response to the disaster in Haiti. Working with the international community, we are focused on how to sustain this relief operation and how we will help Haiti rebuild. More about the crisis and how to help: state.gov/haitiquake

Secretary Clinton announced the launch of a new tool on state.gov, the “Person Finder,” to allow people to find and share information on missing persons in Haiti. In the largest mobile donation campaign to date, one million people texted “Haiti” to “90999” to raise $10 million for relief efforts.

What innovative things can we do to assist Haiti in relief efforts?

Comments

Comments

Carol B.
|
Florida, USA
January 19, 2010

Carol in Florida writes:

Why don't we get some of our old Navy ships and/or cruise ships out of moth balls send them down to Haiti to let folks live on them while helping to rebuild their country. They MUST be a part of their own country's rebuilding! Habitat could be involved at the proper time. Military doctors and nurses on properly equipped ships could be more help THERE than trying to bring people here. I disagree with an open immigration policy. As generous as the U.S.A. is we cannot presently take care of our "own". It would set a dangerous precident to just bring peoplw here. Soon every country dealing with a natural disaster would expect us to do the same for them. Our country is built on LEGAL immigrants and we are suffering now because of too many "illegal"..PLEASE let's not make that situation WORSE!

Joe
|
Tennessee, USA
January 20, 2010

Joe in Tennessee writes:

1. Get Richard Cheney and Halliburton (professionals) to take over. The savings in time, and lives will more than pay for itself. Get people out who are not professionals and hire people who are on the same page and prepared for this.
2. There was a program on the order of FEMA which developed housing which could be dropped in. If nothing else: ship the trailers still unused in NC from Katrina and provide housing.

3. Get Siemens to re establish utilities and redirect to an area and BUILD A NEWER CITY...BLOCK BY BLOCK. Have a professional company who has experience come in.

4. If you insist on doing things yourself then organize like the old CCCs of the thirties and have the people rebuild...so far it shows Governments cannot organize anything…not even a MASH tent set up within five days..why? Physicians who make up their own surgical tools, why? All the Good intentions in the world do not replace organization. This should be done like a business enterprise, not some hodgepodge political relief effort.

5. LEARN and if Governments are to use the UN, etc. when these events occur, then develop a methodology which will circumvent all the problems. This would include legal international issues from day one as well as some portable housing ...be realistic as these events may continue.

6. Stop using it as a political effort. Too many Chiefs don’t help anything; especially, when they have no direct experience in actual setting up tent cities to begin with. Calling everyone one who may be able to help instead of one organized business is part of the problem. Put the money to a controllable source.

7. Get the lazy press out...its disgusting watching someone stick a microphone in holes and faces for a free lunch. They don't have to actually be journalist. Exposure is fine,but put the violins away and put in some effort. Get people out who don't contribute. Even CNNs Anderson Cooper kept shooting some young male who was bleeding profusly before he put his camera down...whats that all about? Ohh, it sells air time...we love to see people suffer.

Make it a business effort....

Ron
|
New York, USA
January 19, 2010

Ron in New York writes:

Enlist journalists to rapidly connect people in need to resources. CNN just called out for a surgery center to receive a women who was pulled from a collapsed building. Journalism in service to needy people.

Kate L.
|
California, USA
January 20, 2010

Kate L. in California writes:

I understand this is an extreme long-shot, but my friend Fritz D. and his wife and infant daughter are in desperate need of non-immigrant visas for travel to the US. Like many in Port Au Prince they are sleeping in the streets, have no food or water, and their daughter is ill. The US Embassies in both Haiti and the Dominican Republic say they are not processing visas for Haitians right now because of the influx of Americans needing to be evacuated. Fritz and his wife both have passports and a place to stay in the US (California specifically) and there are several people willing to help them financially while they are here. They have significant ties to Haiti (jobs, family) and I am sure they would pass their interviews for the visas, as they have traveled to the States before.

Again, I'm sure this is most likely not a possibility right now, but I have to at least try. If you know anyone who can help, please have them call or email me. Thank you so much.

Best,
Kate L.

Jonel J.
|
Virginia, USA
January 19, 2010

Jonel J. in Virginia writes:

Hello!

I'm thrilled by the outpouring of support from the international community following the terrible disaster in Haiti. I think what we should do now is to evacuate everybody from the affected areas to a centralized location (somewhere in Haiti, probably LaGonave) in order to clear the streets of debris and rebuild the infrastructures. We cannot afford to keep the people on the streets while we put a band aid. We need to uproot the causes of Haiti's conditions (being in such a desperate stage). The haitian people stands ready for such a challenge, including moving the looters as far away as possible. Thank you.

Lisa W.
|
California, USA
January 20, 2010

Lisa W. in California writes:

Great job amassing resources,

Some ideas to offer...deputize a liaison at airport for all volunteer organizations to contact orgs. to provide update on location of ngo volunteer org. activity in Haiti and specific needs. Reach out to reporters through media liaison on the ground: CNN/Anderson Cooper etc. to provide specifics and US to provide aerial map to outlet of locations to identify all makeshift hospital sites and specific requests. Send army envoy via helicopter to each mobile hospital to drop army specialist with supplies and provide tool for contact at medical site to communicate instantly with control and command at airport. Generate database of each hospital's medical needs and coordinate a military medic transport to deliver much needed supplies. Provide digital camera to document who is there and who is being treated for medical records upload and cross check with website listing missing or people trying to connect. Utilize army media liaison to get information from media outlets as to locations and specific requests. Create blog specifically for entries concerning medical supplies and personnel needs for the mobile units to the comand center at the airport can respond quickly. Utilize cell phone reports, i reports, twitter, internet, link with volunteer org web sites to facilitate information sharing between organizations. Media reports paint negative picture of uncoordinated efforts between airport command and outside world, though we do see activity. Are praising Israeli organization, when sending medical personnel because they have all medical supplies and mobile medical unit all ready to go, seem very organized. Issues are amputations, anesthesiologists, turniquets, surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, antibiotics...coordinate and prioritize medics access to haiti airport and assistance via air or convoy to sites around Haiti. You all are going alot, but there is still a perception there that there is no central command. We need to dispel that perception to create trust that we know what we are doing. Who is in control? UN then Haiti Gov. then US? What is structure, who are contacts and how do field personnel with access to info on the ground get a sense of control and align the incredible behind the scenes efforts with the negative picture being painted in the media as to uncoordinated effort and slow response.

Malden
|
Italy
January 20, 2010

Malden in Italy writes:

Dear Sir or Madam,

I made few days ago two posts on dip note blog of mrs.Hilary Clinton.
let me do one small ulterior proposal to be considered.It is clear that idea of parashutung the food and water from the sky ower
the plains around the Port au Prince is comon sense thinking what can come to ewery reasonable person therefore I do not claim it es my own idea.Lets say I tried to help to choose this option es one of the most strange but due to the conditions there more apropriate.
What can be done eventualy further folowing this idea wich is started to take place es I seen yesterday is next.
To avoid riots and disorder in the distribution of food and water because of injust tendency of the groups armed downthere
among the citizens oh Haiti wich are desperate is to do parashuting the goods on the places where once on the ground US troups,marines can soraund this places where are goods grounded and under threat of the force start to distribute this goods to the population.In each case just presence of the marines who circumferenced the grounded goods
is one invite to the population to mantain the order.
Other thing is that this can in efficient mode lure desperate people to abandon the Port
au Prince where is due to the ruins and real threat of deseses imposible to insert any serious level of the civil order.
I do invite som American Company ti contact me regarding tent constructions,hawe one patentable invention in this field.I do already poses few inventions wich has nothing to do unfortunately with emergency cases like this Shizma is.

Best regards,

Mr.Malden B.

Jennifer M.
|
Australia
January 20, 2010

Jennifer M. in Australia writes:

PLEASE FORWARD TO THE SECRETARY

Dear Secretary Clinton,

In 1996 I traveled to Haiti. I spent time with a former interpreter and Haitian author Henry Hogarth, who acted as guide and cultural expert on Haiti for my purposes.

I was interested in viewing art from specific centres such as the Centre d'Art in PAP.

I also was hoping to discuss the idea of Haiti becoming a future ECO-ADAPTIVE SOCIETY (Copyright J. Mannall 2008)with specific Haitian visionaries. I am cited on the Haitian OTEC (solar energy from the sea) site of Dr Gerard G.

Henry Hogarth then extrapolated from this the vision, after viewing an ecodesign educational program written and implemented by me in 1991-1998 that ran in one of Australia's most innovative schools, for a future Haitian TECHNO-ORGANIC SOCIETY (Copyright H. Hogarth. See OTEC Haiti site of Energintat S.A.)

Obviously, I would like to discuss innovation (THAT MUST NOW START AT THE GROUND UP IN TERMS OF EDUCATION)given the recovery possibilities for a future Haiti.

If someone could contact me in relation to this matter I believe it would be beneficial to a future Haiti.

My contact number is available and please leave a message.

Yours faithfully,

Jennifer M.
B. Art Ed

Nick
|
Colorado, USA
January 20, 2010

Nick in Colorado writes:

Can FEMA provide the people of Haiti a few of the thousands of manufactured homes purchased and sitting idle post Katrina???

Flavius
|
Virginia, USA
January 20, 2010

We could offer it commonwealth status.

I'm sorry. Somebody must have slipped me something in my drink.

Rosemary
|
New Jersey, USA
January 21, 2010

Rosemary in New Jersey writes:

Aside from texting Haiti to 90999 (which I will be doing regularly), we can follow Haitian Twitter accounts and retweet crucial information. We did that two nights ago about a woman under a bank and a girl at a college. We retweeted the way we did during the June Iran Election demonstrations. The next day both were located and extricated.

NEXT: Immediately build at least one more airstrip. I can't believe it still only has one!

Teresa M.
|
New Hampshire, USA
January 21, 2010

Teresa M. in New Hampshire writes:

To distribute items:Beforehand, pass out easily identifiable outer wear. Have the outer wear portray a time and location where one can pick up items. Locations could be colors and then just print the time. After a great many of the outer wear is distributed, and the items are starting to get to people--have an offer for people to help distribute food and other items.

Jonah B.
|
New York, USA
January 21, 2010

Jonah B. in New York writes:

Please check out our Open Solace Haiti efforts

http://wiki.crisiscommons.org/wiki/The_Open_Solace_Haiti_Project

We are attempting to set up a grassroots network to exchange messages of support and consolation to, from, and w/in haiti.

We are striving to create a system for Haitians, inside and outside of Haiti to create media by Haitians and for Haitians.

Our first project is a video postcard exchange.

We could use your help!

Thanks

Steve T.
|
New York, USA
January 21, 2010

Steve T. in New York writes:

CARGO SIZED SEAPLANES if the (two ) Haiti airports are bottlenecked. Haiti is sxurrounded by water-airstrips.
Is the Lockheed-Martin-"floatplane" conversion for the C-130's operational?
What of the Japanese Shinmaywa US-IA or the Bombardier CL-415 -- may be easier to fly - in from Japan thatn for a core of volunteer Haitian-American Creole-speaking her i Brkyn to wait for landing rights on a single airstrip -- got to decnetralize the relief effort anyway -- USE THE HIATIAN COASTLINES -- please.

Blessd,

SMT, NYC

Patty
|
North Carolina, USA
January 21, 2010

Patty in North Carolina writes:

From the moment I heard about this tragedy I felt compelled to open my home to a family in need. And today I still feel very strongly about this. Even if it is temporary housing until they can go back.

Tammi D.
|
Colorado, USA
January 21, 2010

Tammi D. in Colorado writes:

Two ideas that seem obvious to me:

1) telephone and other communications with medical volunteers in the field seem scarce, yet the media seems able to stream video out, so have the media report their longitude & latitude (they should have gps yes?) when reporting a medical or other need. A tech volunteer team can map these as they get reported and have a centralized organizer communicate this to incoming supplies/aid.

2) Medical teams are desperate for supplies that are circling the airports. With the kind of reporting above, supplies could be dropped.

Tammi D.
|
Colorado, USA
January 21, 2010

Tammi D. in Colorado writes:

also, a fuel shortage is imminent there. Is someone looking into vehicles using other power sources. Even pedi-cab type bicycles that can transport equipment and people?

Tammi D.
|
Colorado, USA
January 21, 2010

Tammi D. in Colorado writes:

One last item...for now. Per my previous message, reporting needs by Longitude & latitude is ideal. However, if everyone doesn't have access to gps, couldn't they start a system of making giant signs with location names on them and put them on the ground or on roof (rubble)tops. Get GoogleEarth to use their satellite to constantly survey the area looking for "location markers".

Pam L.
|
California, USA
January 21, 2010

Pam L. in California writes:

Based on my own experience doing disaster relief in Tibet following a 2001 earthquake, the best, most lasting assistance is something that boosts the local economy and provides jobs. So, once urgent needs for humanitarian assistance are met, I would suggest tax incentives for investment, especially support for export of Haitian products and development of tourism.

Renee B.
|
Minnesota, USA
January 21, 2010

Renee B. in Minnesota writes:

I believe you should allow all medical personnel and medical supplies to be shipped in, and cancel Haiti's debt from the IMF, US or any others. Allow these people to seek refuge in the US until a freezable solution can be had.

Elizaabeth j.
|
Florida, USA
January 21, 2010

Elizaabeth J. in Florida writes:

Help Haiti we should ask the nations of the world to adopt a section of Haiti and develope it as a gift to the Haitian people.

Each country would develope the infrastucture of their adopted section like their country.

This would be the msot valuable thing we could do is to call for an initiative of this caliber.

Jonah B.
|
New York, USA
January 21, 2010

Jonah B. in New York writes:

Dear Secretary Clinton,

The Open Solace Haiti Project was formed at the CrisisCamp and is trying to reestablish lines of communication between haitians in teh diaspora and haitians in haiti. We aim to facilitate independant information exchange that will allow Haitians to create media by haitians for hatians.

Our first project is the Haitian Video Postcard Exchange Network, described here

http://wiki.crisiscommons.org/wiki/The_Open_Solace_Haiti_Project

and the strategic backdrop

http://alchemicalmusings.org/2010/01/16/humane-communications-over-human...

We would love you help in fullfilling this locally expressed need.

Thanks!
Jonah

Ruth W.
|
Tennessee, USA
January 21, 2010

Ruth W. in Tennessee writes:

There are two million homeless people in the earthquake zone in Haiti. People are dying because of infection, no hospitals, no electricity, no food, no shelter. We need to evacuate the people to countries that will take them in. We know that France and the United States have been involved in the affairs of Haiti since they won their independence. It seems the would be the firs countries to step up and take evacuees into their countries. We must evacuate the people so that we won't lose them all to death and desolation. I would be willing to do whatever I can to help coordinate this effort. Thank you.

Nadege D.
|
New Jersey, USA
January 21, 2010

Nadege D. in New Jersey writes:

I heard that the governor of PA was able to bring home approximately 53 Haitian orphans. Can we mass evacuate all of the orphans still there, ASAP?? Can we bypass all the red tape understanding that this is a crisis situation? Once they are here can we organize temporary housing until paperwork for full adoption gets approved. There are many, many haitian americans (besides others) who would be more than willing to take them in.

Joe
|
Tennessee, USA
January 21, 2010

Joe in Tennessee writes:

There seems to be little realization that the UN is currently dealing with some 116 relief efforts similar and even worse than this worldwide.

If you must make some issue of anything than realize that there is little or no actual Crisis Management improvements since Katrina in the bureaucratic end. The Military has done more than anyone and the press has done little but harp playing since this affair took place. Why are they still not in at least twenty countries where relief efforts are needed and going on now? Where are they? They are no longer journalist or reporters, just relief valves for profit at the most convenient aspects.

This should be recognized for what it going to be needed in the future. Population control of some sort is a reality that must be faced. That is one of the major underlying problems that goes well beyond economic resources. It may sound cold, but God gave us intellect to use, not abandon. The tree not eaten from, which we did, was the Tree of Knowledge: For thou shall become as Me. Well, what is so hard to understand there?

There is the some nonsense about the people winning their independence on this site a few times: Is something wrong with recognizing the reality of their government for what it is and has been since a military junta?

No matter what we do, how much we spend, it will go back to what it was unless long range changes are made from the top down. That is the reality of the situation and if one person is saved in Haiti and five lost in Nigeria and the Western Sahara because funds are being redirected, what kind of compassion is that in reality? What everyone should be looking at is the larger picture, not guilt relief. Even here in America where is the two hundred million for those families living in tents still?

One effort does not a problem solve…..

Sal G.
|
Connecticut, USA
January 22, 2010

Sal G. in Connecticut writes:

will it be possible to speed up pending petitionS of us citizen to be reunited with their brothers and sisters FROM HAITI? THAT WOULD BE A SURE WAY TO HELP SOME OF THE EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS.

Dorothee J.
|
New York, USA
January 22, 2010

Dorothee B. J. in New York writes:

My mother before she dies adopted a 5-year girl. She never thought of legally giving her our name. She died when our sister was 8 years old. Now she is married and has a 3 year old son. After 3 tries, she hasn't been able to get a visa. Now after this terrible earthquake, how can we save her and her little boy? How would we be able to make her come to the US as a family member. She is our little sister, but with a different name. Can someone help?

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