What Can the International Community Do To Help Secure Aung San Suu Kyi's Freedom?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
June 19, 2009
Aung San Suu Kyi Image Projected on European Parliament Building

The United States Government is concerned about the spurious charges that Burmese authorities have leveled against Aung San Suu Kyi. Aung San Suu Kyi celebrated her 64th birthday last week from Insein Prison – yet another sad reminder of the Burmese authorities’ attempts to suppress the democratic aspirations of the Burmese people.

We urge the regime to cease the unjustified prosecution of Aung San Suu Kyi. We join with the calls of the international community and urge her immediate release, along with the release of all the more than 2,100 political prisoners the Burmese regime currently holds.

What can the international community do to help secure Aung San Suu Kyi's freedom?

Comments

Comments

Charleston
|
Tennessee, USA
June 20, 2009

Charleston in Tennessee writes:

Listen to those Burmese who know the truth--who have the knowledge. They are in America. I am not talking about the U.S. Campaign for Burma, etc. I am speaking of those who truly fought, who were truly brutalized and who truly took part in the resistance. Find them! Ask them!

Peter
|
Netherlands
June 20, 2009

Peter in The Netherlands writes:

This can only be done by the U.S., through intense pressure, and not to bother about Russia and China, simply dictate democracy for also China and Russia and also European countries have lost the connection with democracy, freedom of speech.

Louis
|
United Kingdom
June 20, 2009

Louis in U.K. writes:

If we act as a united community it will help.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 20, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

20 June 09

OLIVE BRANCH OF PEACE TO THE GOVERNMENT OF BURMA

The only way the United States will have positive results is by opening the gateway of communications to Burma on there level. We Americans always have one unique problem in the world, we tend to try and force ourselves on countries around the world and some just do not like Americans. Our views, policies, laws, religion, rights, privledges that other countries disagree with, or have had laws in their countries way before United States even became a nation. Who are we to dictate to the world our views, when they can just as easily say NO. We ofcourse would have to turn that around so they would be more eager to say YES. Whis means sending another team over to Burma and learn their customs, values and try to find common ground so we as a country, a Nation can build together towards the resolutions needed concerning those that have been taken as prisoners and get them released. Remebering what was said in the bible, The Lord Spoke these words, "I am the Lord thy God, "Brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage, which was talking about the Jews and Mosses. The part that I will leave everyone with was the ending to the 10 Commandments where Mosses and God were on the mountain, the trumphets were sounded as lightning and thunder appeared. The sky was filled with smoke, which now might be Holy Smoke! So when it's thundering and lightning outside, always remember God is nearby. Also take some safety precautions as well, no jewelry or anything on your body that conducts power. I heard a woman in Florida was on the beach when a lightning bolt hit the woman on the neck, 5 miles away, the bolt was so intense, she was wearing a necklace and it fried around her neck, causing her to perish. Safety tips can also help people survive disasters!

Godbless and Peace on earth, Goodwill to mankind!!!

Charleston
|
Tennessee, USA
June 20, 2009

Charleston in Tennessee writes:

Obviously you know nothing of the Burmese regime. You might as well talk to the devil for the good it will do. The Burmese people have begged the U.S. for help and intervention for years.

Ari
|
Hawaii, USA
June 21, 2009

Ari in Hawaii writes:

Dear Colleagues,

ShALOHA from Hawaii...

This might be silly...What do those leaders like on a personal level? Do we know? Great food, entertainment? Give it to them...Or can we make a swap? Kyi is really a Pawn in a Bigger Chess game...Can we swap a piece for a piece, per se...Just ask what they want her her freedom...And have limits...

On a sadder note, albeit, if and when she dies...She as a Martyr will have a higher Voice that will destroy those leaders, eventually, and they know it...

In the Spiritual Realm if she is forced there...I PRAY that she becomes and Angel of GREAT Change for Hashem's good people globally-INDEED, AMEN.

Ari

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2009

Donald writes:

@ Charleston in Tennessee -- It doesn't really matter what I think, what matters is how people on earth can finally communicate without borders, without problems. Opening a door of communication is what it's all about. Having the right attitude, pressing forward, I'm sure the people of Burma have made their concerns known throughout the world, the problems they are experiencing with the Government. I say this again, we have to find common ground, a foothold that would allow our people to exchange good as to comparison what we all know happens in Burma. That is why I mentioned an OLIVE BRANCH FOR PEACE! It's to create a new bonding, bring in new life, establish a Diplomatic channel. I actually do know a thing or two about Burma, especially when the Japanese had invaded back in World War 2. Since my Grandfather from Great Britian, United Kingdom spent 5 years in Burma fighting as a British Soldier with heavy artillary against the Japanese. This can be verified with HMS.

The new administration is about change and bringing about peace, so let's lead by example and prove to the Government of Burma that we are not a threat to it's Country, but merely trying to help it's people. This would be a positive step foward!

Godbless!

Garrett
|
Texas, USA
June 21, 2009

Garrett in Texas writes:

Release Aung San Suu Kyi! Her arrest is an attack on human rights everywhere!

Ryan
|
District Of Columbia, USA
June 21, 2009

Ryan in Washington, DC writes:

I was born in Burma and lived under the junta's law and order for many years. I know them well. All they want is to hold their power as long as possible and eliminate those who want to shake their comfortable positions. They will try everything they can to make sure Daw Su Kyi's health deteriorate and hide her from the international scene. You might be wondering who are "they"? Well, "they" refer to a couple of people in the high ranking circle that are controlling everything and keeping everything running. What can we do? Well, if you want to stop the military machine from damaging its nations further then we need to fix the machine by replacing the right components.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 21, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Let's see, let me count the ways the international community can resolve this...

Assuming the political will is there, to declare the current regime illegitimate, as not representitive of the people, and thus having no sovergn right to speak of in claiming power in Burma...

Then the international community might think of doing now what it should have done when the regime held onto power illegitimately long ago...

Like removing them from the political landscape, by force if need be.

Give the military junta enough time, and they'll want nukes too, so sooner rather than later would be good.

We've seen this movie before, and the plot-line stinks.

So therin lies the only real option for resolution, in the realization that if the regime were "gone", we wouldn't have to think about how to secure anyone's freedom in Burma, they would be at that point.

So the question realy becomes "how does the international community remove a sitting government in a peaceful manner?"

Which would be the preferred outcome, I think.

Nancy
|
California, USA
June 21, 2009

Nancy in California writes:

Burma is a beautiful country and the people are gentle and kind. It is a shame that the International community did not speak up and get involved in 1962 when the Military took over. Just like Iran today, the people of Burma protested, but without the support of the International community Aung San Suu Kyi never got to take her rightful position as the elected leader of Burma. She has been under house arrest, in and out, for what? 40 years? She probably is one of the bravest living women in the world today. Burma is closely tied to China and India (economically). Due to Burma's poor record on Human Rights (specifically Aung San Suu Kyi), the U.S. has banned imports from Burma. Since the infastructure in Burma has fallen apart, I would suggest the U.S. reinstate relations with Burma. Offer to help them economically if they would begin to meet certain minimal obligations regarding human rights (one being the release of ASSK). Isolating Burma only hurts the people, opening relations with them and having a continuing dialog has a better chance of getting them to the negotiations table.

mahmoud h.
|
Egypt
June 21, 2009

Mahmoud in Egypt writes:

Months to raise the issue on the Web sites and invite visitors to vote in favor of granting the right of health care, as well as the personal attorney to allow the work of the meetings in order to get the defense must also urged NGOs and civil society organizations to put pressure on Burmese regime By sending a statement that called for the embassies of the states in those institutions, and NGOs

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 21, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

I found this article online with voice of America thought it was worth sharing on here.

Global Well-Wishers Commemorate Burma's Suu Kyi's 64th Birthday
By Julia Ritchey
Washington
20 June 2009

Burma's famous opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, spent her 64th birthday Friday at a high-security prison outside Rangoon. The pro-democracy leader has spent 13 of the last 19 years under house arrest by the military junta and is currently awaiting the re-opening of her trial on charges of violating her house arrest. Yet for all the government's attempts to silence Aung San Suu Kyii, her resilience has become the symbol of the movement to bring democracy to Burma.

Human rights advocates around the world renew their call for the release of Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on her 64th birthday, 19 Jun 2009
Human rights advocates around the world are commemorating Aung San Suu Kyi's 64th birthday. It is a time of little celebration for the pro-democracy leader, who spent the day in Burma's notorious Insein prison outside Rangoon.

Aung San Suu Kyi is charged with violating her house arrest by providing shelter to an American visitor who trespassed on her property in May. Human rights groups consider the trial a pretext for keeping her detained before the country's 2010 elections.

Rusty Dalizo is with the Free Burma Coalition Philippines, whose group staged a protest Friday in front of the Burmese embassy in Manila.

"We are calling on the brutal and bloody military dictatorship in Rangoon to immediately release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and over 2,000 political prisoners still detained in jails all across the country today," he said.

Aung San Suu Kyi is the daughter of a prominent figure in Burma's independence who was assassinated when she was just two years old. She was educated abroad and upon returning to care for her ailing mother in the late 1980s, became politically active in the National League for Democracy party.

She went on to win a landslide victory in elections held by the military regime in 1990. But the military junta, which has run the country since 1962, refused to hand over power and put her under house arrest, where she has spent 13 of the last 19 years.

In Washington Thursday, the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission brought supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi together to renew pleas for her release.

Kenneth Wollack, who heads an organization that promotes democracy worldwide, recalls meeting with Aung San Suu Kyi in 1995 and being struck by her sense of humor.

"During my visit, her only request is that I send her books on political humor. 'If you lose your sense of humor,' she said, 'you lose everything.' I could never have imagined at the time that 14 years later that she would still be held captive in her own country," he said.

Dr. Sein Win is the prime minister of the Burmese government in exile and a first cousin to Aung San Suu Kyi. He says the government is still afraid of the influence she has over the Burmese people.

Aung San Suu Kyi supporters light candles on a birthday cake in hopes she will be released before her 65th birthday
"We are all very much affected by her courage, by her commitment, and also her readiness to stand up and talk for the people," he added.

The United States and the EU have imposed strict sanctions on the Burmese government, but with limited effect.

Aung San Suu Kyi has spent 14 of her birthdays in detention, but her supporters hope she will spend her 65th birthday in freedom.

Edite
|
Canada
June 21, 2009

Edite in Canada writes:

Short of going in and bombing or sending in special ops, there is not much the international community can do. If she requires medical care now, getting involved in a long protracted diplomatic discourse will not help her.Besides, when will every one learn that people who do these kinds of things which are not just, but instead, are criminal behaviour along with kidnapping and detention, simply thumb their noses at the world and dare us to intervene. They do not care and trying to appeal to an inner, better sense of themselves does not work because they do not have one. So between a rock and a hard place, or better still, a real conundrum, the status quo will probably remain. If the West is still a freedom-fighter, why was her re -arrest not dealt with when it happened instead of only now when Aung San Suu Kiy is ill and requires medical care? Frankly,one is disgusted by the failure to act before the need to, arises.

Lyn
|
New Jersey, USA
June 22, 2009

Lyn in New Jersey writes:

I realize that Aung San Suu Kyi, is a Noble Prize winner. But what is the U.S. State Department going to do for her, when they don't even care enough to act on the interests of one of their own citizens who they are aware is in dire need. Joe Dunsavage has been missing in Honduras since Mother's Day, little has been done by the US Embassy to ... Read Moreassist the family in the search. Even after corroborated reports of an American being found in La Ceiba and being treated at the hospital for dehydration, the embassy could do no more than "call a liason" to inquire on the reports. Action is needed now and time is of the essence, but of course the Embassy proves once again that they are more interested in acting on behalf of foreign citizens for the publicity sake, than on behalf of their own citizens.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 22, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Edite in Canada,

The key to peceful transition lies wih the rank and file Burmese military and whether they remain loyal to the regime.

A lot of these folks lost family members during the typhoon and arn't too happy with the way it was handled.

What you see happening in Iran could happen next week in Burma, so there's other options besides direct military intervention, including bankrupting the current regime and if the North Korean ship we're tracking on its way to Burma has an illegal shipment onboard, then an arms embargo may be further brought to bear against the government of Burma for recieving illegal arms.

And unless China wants another North Korea on ts border with all the "Security liability" that represents, then they will work as partners with the Burmese people to affect political change in Burma for their long-term national strategic interests for a more peaceful, stable, prosperous region.

This would not be as a result of any pressure brought to bear by the US, but as a result of having a frank discusson based upon common sense and common desires for the future of the region.

Edite
|
Canada
June 23, 2009

Edite in Canada writes:

Thank you, Eric in New Mexico, for your thoughtful approach which sounds like a good idea. The only problem that remains is that it sometimes takes so long for these plans to bear fruit and consequently human suffering is also prolonged. Aung San Suu Kyi is to be greatly admired for her forceful convictions and her fight for freedom for her people has surely given hope to her countrymen who must be sick at heart for her present predicament. One can only surmise that all you believe will happen sooner, rather later.You seem to have the smarts of a political analyst who does a lot of analyzing for a living. Keep up the good work and lets hope your scenario works.At the very least it does bring some comfort to know that others are thinking more long-term and have the patience to wait it out.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 23, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

The State Department needs a team of people who are willing to go into foreign countries and get the ones taken hostage or in a POW (Prisoner of War Status) and get them home safe. How many American people vanish or go missing in countries around the world. Even though I have an illness today of streph throat, have seen the Doctor, and few days should be back on my feet. I would of been one of ones willing to help find missing people abroad. It never concerned me what country, what mattered more was they were Americans and taken. If Americans were involved in breaking the laws in a foreign country, then that is between them and the State Department, however, my door is still opened to trying to help find people. I have relayed this to the State Department, all I need is the ways and means to help find them once in the country. I would even go into North Korea, who can be afraid of a 4 foot midget KIM? I think everyone knows what I mean about ways and means. "It takes money to move ships, fly on planes, and be able to move around on forign soil." My offer is opened unless people truly don't care. My prayers are for all missing people around the world, and I ofcourse will always believe in Angles.

Godbless

palgye
|
South Korea
June 24, 2009

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Dear to Secretary Hillary Clinton.

before saying, How`s about Secretary Hillary Clinton`s health(elbow)
now`s it`s a very big issue to our.

If is not Secretary Hillary Clinton to if and like this discussion oneself comes to seem as the wrong to be skillful qualitative thing.
And, Aung San Suu Kyi?s, almost hangs appears the thing to become the book quantity of one volume arranged well about issue and again raised or ...

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 25, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Edite in Canada,

As a student of the human condition, I have long noted that people do the strangest things for the love of God, country and family, and that nations do the oddest things in the interest of national security.

As long as the Burmese government lives in fear of a single middle aged, frail woman , keeping her under lock and key, then a those 400,000 some odd troops they have don't mean a whole lot in terms of their security, being utterly useless against against a threat that only exists in the minds of those that can't grasp that freedom for the people essentially grants them freedom as well.

Who is more the prisoner, the one behind bars, or the ones that must keep her there?

It is not political analysis per se, but as the human condition extends into the realm of the political, it is best assessed in context with everything else.

I appreciate your comments, I have no idea if it presents a good idea, but we'll know if it gets followed up on whether it actually is or not, and I suppose that will depend a lot on whether it is politically do-able on China's part.

As it concerns patience, and timelines...

Anyone who understands the referenced event I speak of in the excerpt from a post (below) will understand that this too is a moment in time that defines this nation's fostering and nuturing of democratic principals, international norms, and expectations of populations to have governance that respects their voice in affairs of state, as essential to the proper functioning of any government.

I was very glad to see the President take a very well stated position on the question of the future legitimacy of the Iranian government yesterday.

I expect we'll hear similar strong words on Burma before long.

If their own people cannot recognize their government's legitimacy, I could see us having a real hard time recognizing the leadership of Iran either, in any shape, way, or form.

Except as legitimate state sponsors of terror who call their own citizens "terrorists" because they refuse to be silenced, that we'll do because that's what they are.

Now that's something we can act on, not just talk about and condemn, and as the President said, "We'll see how this plays out."

What's playing on U-tube right now is a crime against humanity in all its bloody glory in tribute to Orwellian ideals, and the political ball has been struck in a hard line drive towards the Democratic nations of the world and we either make the play along with the international community, or watch an essential opportunity dribble through our legs, and ultimatly lose the deciding game in the "World Series".

We actually have an obligation to interfere, and the President has duly run interference for the Iranian people to get the regime off their backs for having an indiginous opinion and debate, along with protest in just cause.

Will words suffice to change the nature of a brutal regime?

Not even.

Right about now if a meteorite hit dead center on Friday prayers this week, folks in Iran would take it as a sign from Allah that he's just a wee bit upset with the regime for owtlawing the words Allah Akbar (God is great) to be expressed in public by the people.

Hypocracy knows no limits in a theocracy, apparently.

We've seen how this plays out before throughout history, and I'm not sure the international community is willing to sit by and be further witness to the slaughter of civilians expressing themselves, they will be moved to act in unison.

The situation calls for it, and moral obligation to humanity demands charges be brought upon the leadership for these crimes.

Public Affairs Must Inform Foreign Policy"@PJ Crowley,

To sum the Iranian events up in terms we can both relate to, we are at that inflection point where the ball either goes through Billy Buckner's legs or not in terms of making a difference along with the international community.

Will the Iranian people know the agony of defeat, and have to wait until the "curse of the Babe" is lifted to be granted that magic moment in the sun?

As Red Soxs fans, we can afford to be patient, and long suffering...it has an end. I won't speak for the Iranian people on that score."

palgye
|
South Korea
June 25, 2009

Palgye in South Korea writes:

Dear to management(?)

Burmese and Aung San Suu Kyi

Internal controls seriously the democratic revolution in compliance with the citizens happening, that the situation which is difficult and (the different personal letter room military group centralizes the chart) press E I thoroughly am controlled and from the situation which falls behind

"Supports Karen families informally" and bothers their rear and - the relationship of the grudge which is considerable knows and was formed will be hung with - uses(?) the Buddhism which is a mental prop of Burmese's and protects in the base which, will hang to raise an ardent wish about democratization base of military regime weakly, makes and the mortar makes that does, a military regime internal discord and sees.(Speaks a too many talk too shortly.)

Solves easily and quickly the mortar makes the discord of circumference country and from - is a warfare. Does and is not but when is a method and - is pulled down a military regime and is serious the thought holds a little.(Speaks severely)

We want to secure Aung San Suu Kyi`s safe...
We will ruin Burmese administartion(SPDC), if not, it`s repeating in Burmese.(for a while the dictator in compliance with the elite who decimal is educated is forecast and from puts on.)

joe
|
Tennessee, USA
June 25, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

It would seem that freedom has its cost and martyrs. She has dedicated herself toward democracy since 1989 when she was imprisoned without trail for three years. She is and was imprisoned under the 1975 State Protection Act (Article 10 b), which grants the government the power to imprison persons for up to five years without a trial. So again, we come back to the International Community developing enforceable laws, via Trade agreements, which protect basic human rights which are not inconsistent with any governmental rule of development. What is not mentioned here is that we, as well as the UN are asking for some 2000 people be released, which puts them in an awkward position: All or nothing, so they are doing nothing.

What is going on is on a much larger scale than what this question seems to skirt because it is not simply about one person; because the International community is a house divided.

Burma and Thailand both have signed: The Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) has signed a trade agreement with the Union of Myanmar Federation of Chambers of Commerce (UMFCCI) as part of its effort to forge closer economic ties with Southeast Asian countries.

U.S. imports of private commercial services (i.e., excluding military and government) were $1.8 billion in 2007 (latest data available), up 16.9 percent ($257 million), and up 272 percent ($1.3 billion) from 1994 level. Travel accounted for most of U.S. services imports from Thailand. Since Thailand is our 29th largest importer, it would seem we have a lever with them. Again the problem being Human Rights; which even now we are trying to impose.

If we cannot get countries who do business with us on such a grand scale to develop human rights within their county, there is no reason for Burma to fall in line either. .. that being on a single issue scale.

Where human rights are concerned and the International community is split comes on the heels of this:

The Russian Foreign Ministry's information and press department on Sunday said it rejects any attempts to bring the Burma issue to the United Nations Security Council saying it is an internal affair and does not pose a threat to peace and security of the region and the world community, according a report by Moscow-based the ITAR-TASS News Agency.

"Moscow opposes attempts to internationalize the internal situation in Myanmar [Burma], because it does not endanger peace and security in the region and the world at large," the report quoted Kremlin's Information and Press department as saying.

While Russia has provided Burma with a reactor in 2006, they appear to have no other trade interest other than strategic land value and alliance against civil rights, which points again to them extending a Russia of the past which they deny.

An International Bill of Rights so to speak, needs to be developed by the International Community which will tie in to the Private and governmental sectors of all Nations and the World Bank, IMF. Fair and Free Trade Agreements will be provisional to acceptance of certain human rights of the citizenship and why not?

We should be doing that now here in the US. Imagine the change in the world if we enforced that. we are still the #1 consumer of all imported goods in the world. we still feed two thirds of the world now and with U99 wheat grain problems coming into scope, WE have leverage as the U.S. is the only wheat supply not affected so far...but we need to get on that issue and develope a new strain of wheat...we have not because it's not profitable. Soy and other crops bring more per acre. WHY IS THAT VIABLE HERE?... the worlds problems need to have money, the basic tool of developement, and the problems of the future working in unison or chaos will prevail.

This is not about just one person, it may well symbolize how the world will develope.

Susan
|
Florida, USA
June 25, 2009

Susan in Florida writes:

@Eric in New Mexico:

I know you are making a "joke" but do you think it is appropriate to compare Iran and the Iranian people who are struggling for freedom and human rights to the Red Sox team? This situation is so serious and potentially volatile, that our "American" humor may not translate well. Our own President is being circumspect in order not to add "fuel to the fire" of their official statements that we and Europe are creating the protests and helping the protestors. Our country/government have been criticized for NOT saying more, but at this point I think we are wise to tread carefully. Basically, it is darn if we do, darn if we don't. I just think it is smart to be sensitive to what is going on.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 25, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

I know what the International Community can do, Hire me to go in and get her out. State department has my info, be glad to do it. It's obvious that the woman needs help. Once again, I'm making the offer. Run this by the International Community. My track record is pretty good.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 26, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@Susan in Florida,

If you were to read PJ Crowley's post, you'll note he is a Red Soxs fan, so am I.

The inflection point I referered to concerned whether the international community including the U.S., was "going to make the play" or choke.....the Iranian people's "magic moment in the sun" being at stake.

Nor was it a comparison of the Iranian people to the Red Sox, but a articulation of the situation in a way the Assistant Secretary could personally relate to the assesment.

We are not "damned if we do or damned if we don't." on this.

Not when we stand on the right side of history, and support people's aspirations for freedom. When we do, accusations from tyrants run off our backs like water off a duck's.

But "we"- the international community in this case, cannot pretend we have no good options and do nothing, for that is flat unacceptable to anyone with a heart, and is false, misleading, and a political cop-out by handwringers too blind to know the difference between appeasement and moral certainty.

There are international laws on the books ...it's time to enforce them.

This wouldn't be "adding fuel to the fire", unless perhaps you are too concerned with what the Iranian regime might say about it.

In which case Susan, being a New Mexican, I have already previously gone on record as being perfectly willing to lend the President a rope to deal with ethical infants.

Let's get convictions in the Hague first though, don't want you misinterpreting this to mean I'm suggesting the international community form a lynch mob...unless it is sanctioned by the UN Sec. Council, then we call that a "coalition of the willing", and that's ok by me.

I'll lend them the rope.

In any case, I wasn't joking, and I thought I'd been real clear in my statement generally, so if you need further clarification, just ask.

DAW O.
|
Japan
June 26, 2009

May in Japan writes:

URGENTLY REMOVE SPDC AS LIKE AS WAR BY AMERICAN GOVERNMENT & UN SECURITY COUNCIL .

Susan
|
Florida, USA
June 26, 2009

Susan in Florida writes:

@Eric in New Mexico -- Thank you for the clarification of your post. I guess I just didn't get it. Probably because I am a Yankee fan.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 26, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Susan in Florida,

Yes dear, I do believe being a Yankees fan explains everything....(chuckle).

In any case, it took a decade after that fateful play for the Red Sox to finally put the curse to rest, and if the Iranian people are to wait another decade for freedom, it will be because people only paid lip service now to their aspirations instead of dealing with the bigest threat to mideast peace in a concrete and permanent way, by ending the rein of terror the regime represents in all its many manifestations globally.

And if that requires the use of force, let us not be afraid to use it to create a more peaceful future.

Susan
|
Florida, USA
June 26, 2009

Susan in Florida writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico -- It was good to read today that President Obama and the other members of the G8 were speaking out about the situation in Iran and North Korea. I agree with you that Iran's time is now. We must, we should, support them. Iran plays a significant if not the key role in that part of the world. The totalitarian regime in Iran is making it clear that they will be even more repressive now. The window of opportunity is closing for us to make a difference.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
June 26, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Correction to last post: 2 decades, not one.

Must be getting old. Has anyone seen my brain laying around? I seem to have lost track of it, as well as the years.

.

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