What International Crisis Would Benefit From Greater Public-Private Collaboration?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
May 23, 2009
Pakistani Refugee Camp

Secretary Clinton invited the American people to text contributions to help the UN High Commissioner for Refugees assist the thousands of individuals affected by the recent humanitarian crisis in Pakistan.

Secretary Clinton is committed to increasing the State Department’s engagement with the private sector and civil society. Governments’ and philanthropies’ combined strengths increase their impact, demonstrating the power of partnership at its best.

What international crisis would benefit from greater public-private collaboration?

Comments

Comments

Carolyn
|
Arizona, USA
May 22, 2009

Carolyn in Arizona writes:

Certainly, anyway we can get help to all of the refugees in Pakistan should be on the table. We should all certainly share in the responsibility of the situation in that area. The policies of the last 8 years of the Bush administration have been a cause of this situation.

Tanya
|
District Of Columbia, USA
May 22, 2009

Tanya in Washington, DC writes:

Of course everything could benefit, but if I were picking one, I's suggest there should be a more comprehensive way to explore effective public-private partnership toward increasing access to clean water. Impoverished communities around the globe don't have this very basic human need, and providing it is protective of public health. It is a human issue, not a political one, and should garner a great deal of support from the outset.

Pam
|
Massachusetts, USA
May 22, 2009

Pam in Massachusetts writes:

The etnic cleansing in Darfur has got to be brought to the forefront!!! Contact George Clooney, (actor) in California!!! He is doing what he can but this calls for much more attention and effort on the part of media and the free world!!!

Helen
|
Pennsylvania, USA
May 23, 2009

Helen in Pennsylvania writes:

I think Durfur will benefit the most from a public-private collabration.

parandole
|
South Korea
May 23, 2009

Parandole in South Korea writes:

sorry, it`s not proposal. just happen to South-Korea`s tragedy. sorry, it`s first time and very bad misery.

Hi

it`s only my`s former South-Korea`s President suicide, left his will. suicide. why?

South Korea`s power people urge to him, suicide. (prosecution, press, financial combine, the plutocracyand and aquired rights of this country. If he compromised with "this rotten socoety", he will not commit suicide. Does not deceive the citizen to doing, appears the thing like this result to be coming out. i`m very sad for his suicide. i`m never forget him.)

below is article.

"Former South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun died Saturday after falling into a ravine while climbing a mountain.

He suffered serious head wounds and was immediately taken into a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Police are investigating whether Roh committed suicide, the report said.

Last month, the former president was summoned by the prosecution and grilled over his family's alleged involvement in the snowballing bribery scandal."

now, rainning, in my mind.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
May 23, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

The Country of Pakistan

Crescent moon and star on it's flag

I have done some research on this countries buying habbits. I thought this might be interesting to the State Department and to all Americans.

Pakistan is buying Communications Satellites with Military options lasting 15 years in space from China. Pakistan is buying Submarines from Germany with a billion dollar price tag. Pakistan has also been involved in buying weapons from Romania.

I hope people will keep this in mind about how fluid the situation is in Pakistan and where the money is truly being spent by it's Government and not for the people of Pakistan. Hence, they have money to buy satellites and submarines but not have enough money for the refugees in Swat Valley.

Edite
|
Canada
May 23, 2009

Edite in Canada writes:

There are so many hotspots in this world of ours that it seems incredibly impossible to respond to all of them and engage in direct contact and aid. But as much as it is within our power to do, we must. If many are not free, none of us are free. Russia's aggressive incursion into Georgia was a major obstacle and required direct diplomatic and concrete aid to rebuild destroyed infrastructures. So, Russia, China, North Korea, Syria, Iran, Pakistan and perhaps India, Venezuela are nations with which never-ending contact is necessary. It is vital that their leaders know exactly what the lines in the sand are and if crossed ,what the consequences will be. The words " grave concern" signify diplomatic distaste for what is transpiring in any given country at any given time. But, the "grave" part should leave nothing to the imagination, either in attitudes or real actionable displays of anti-aggression policies.So many trial balloons are constantly being activated that it leaves free countries reeling. Example: cyber warfare against Estonia last year and recent hacking into the Pentagon ( I believe) and other security councils and Departments.Just like the stressors that individuals endure and the rating given to them to indicate stressor levels, perhaps such a listing might be helpful in deciding on priorities in security concerns for America, the Mid-East, Central and Eastern Europe, South America, (Venezuela and Chavez) Africa Sri Lanka, and so on.

joe
|
Tennessee, USA
May 23, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

In earlier postings related to already existing problems, the answer is the same: Not what crisis, nor where, but some reorganization of services already provided, which are much more abundant than realized. The problem is not a lack of private and Government funding or services, it is organization and the lack of it.

CONSOLIDATION: With over 100 charities involved in Darfur alone, much of the resources are wasted by duplication. Even decades ago in Darfur, the efforts were so split up, that only large companies as Halliburton and Siemens working on large projects were on the same page at any given time. Support mechanisms as security need to be consolidated. This is especially true under a crisis situation in under developed or countries in conflict. Neither the countries Military and Police, nor the costs of private security services are available to everyone. If there was a method to consolidate all resources presently available, there would be quite an abundance to work with.

Operations and rebuilding in the past have been funded by private wealthy citizens as well as corporations worldwide; but, it must be remembered that in democratic nations, the funds provided by the government do in fact come from the people. There is no real separation in the monies provided by the Governments of countries and that of their people.

The blog post which did not make it was not meant to be offensive, but, an honest response of what I hear ...

Edite
|
Canada
May 23, 2009

Edite in Canada writes:

Forgot to include two very important countries, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Nicole
|
District Of Columbia, USA
May 24, 2009

Nicole in Washington, DC writes:

Undeniably, the international food security crisis. (i.e. Preparation, procurement, distribution and adjustment)

Eileen C.
|
Florida, USA
June 23, 2009

Eileen from Florida writes:

The crisis of the Family Department in Puerto Rico of fabricating cases against families to take the children againt the will of the children. The children are take away so they can receive money and take money away from another agency within the goverment. Specially the Department of Education of Puerto Rico. The agency have taken these the chidren to a foster home. Law 177 from the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico needs to be revise. More audits needs to be done.

Sulaiman
|
District Of Columbia, USA
May 24, 2009

Sulaiman in Washington, DC writes:

Rampant supply-side corruption: by USAID, MCC, USTDA, DOD -- agencies colluding with consulting firms (beltway bandits) and defense contractors.

Bernard
|
Netherlands
May 24, 2009

Bernard in the Netherlands writes:

Presently there are plenty of problems that need immediate attention as they will cause serious harm all over the world: (shortages of) energy (by 2013-2015 - latest IEA World Energy Outlook)0, water (within 5-10 year; cheack last summit), biodiversity - polination in particular (check next Red List report in June), food (last UN report).

But a bit beyound these problmes lurks the crisis of raw resources and materials; check www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2002/jul/07/research.waste and tha 2008 Natonal Geographic Special Edition 'State of the Planet Earth'. China is building up claims in Africa, a number of countries are claiminig Artic territories. But that satisfies a particular national demand of a few at best; it not enough for the needs of over 9 billion people by 2050.

Public Private cooperations could turn things around by retrieving & recyling there products in cradle to cradle processes. In fact; retrieving materials for ores is much more costly than retrieving them from consumer products.

Bernard
|
Netherlands
May 24, 2009

Bernard in the Netherlands writes:

Bringing down the ecological footprint of the U.S.A. to EU levels (which are still too high). Present expectations are that a second earth will be needed within a few decades if nothing changes. Public Privat Cooperation could set thing in motion, create jobs and opportunities.

Linda
|
Texas, USA
May 24, 2009

Linda in Texas writes:

Any.

People want to help. They just need a leader they can trust.

Secretary Clinton is that leader.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
May 24, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Since just about every crisis involves the displacement of people, the public support ( Int. aid, NGO's, etc) is geared to source-point distribution, IE: refugee camps where large numbers are gathered.

Those that were strong enough or lucky enough to get there that is.

Now the story of my mom's adventure being stranded in Ireland after 9/11 with all flights were cancelled comes to mind as a potential private sector solution.

The Irish put all stranded travellers up in their homes, fed them, even entertained them at no charge, and as one Irishwoman told my mom, "Today, we are all Americans."

And it seems to me that it happened because the notion of good samaritanism is universal, not "American", and crisis does bring out the best in people, especially when crisis is brought on by the worst of people.

They didn't say , "It's someone elses's problem." or "Let the government handle it." , they acted in good faith with the human values that sustain civilization, spontaneously.

The golden rule in applied action.

Now there's some 1.7 million displaced in Pakistan, out of 175 million. If the Pakistani people were to do what the Irish did, and the Pak government provided additional assistance (via int. aid funding, etc) to the displaced and the families that house them throughout Pakistan, then these 1.7 million folks would not be "displaced" per se, but offered sanctuary as is Muslim custom to offer santuary when asked.

When it is safe and secure to do so, they will want to go home and rebuild their lives in Swat, and will need assistance from international donors and the Pak government to do so.

If the Pak government asks its people to open up their homes to the IDP's now, it will take a huge social strain off the system immediately, and the IDP's will be better off with roofs over their heads instead of gathered in camps with sanitation issues and disease being additional factors to contend with.

If the Pakistani people are to understand that "this is their fight too" against extremism and the taliban face put on it, then I think I just offered a way for them to get invoved.

margrete o.
|
California, USA
May 24, 2009

Margrete O. in California writes:

I'm tired of our country helping to foot the bill for all these other countries. We have enough of a crisis at home. And I certainly wouldn't make any contribution to anything involving the antisemitic UN.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
June 23, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

When I think how Pakistan is buying (3) U-214 costing around a billion dollars, getting free planes from China with a oil for plane trade and buying up Comm. Satellites from China suddenly they have no money left for the refugees. How many millions or billions of Riyals has the Saudi Royal Family been giving Pakistan over the years? I have known for years, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia donates money to Pakistan, Egypt and other Arab States. United States is equally guilty by selling them planes that have the ability to carry a nuclear weapon. The United States sends them billions of dollars as well.

If the Pak Government is able to root out the terrorist, great! I agree with Margrete O. why is the United States footing the bill for the Middle East when nobody in our United States Congress created a bill to make Pakistan, Afghanistan or even Iraq pay back our country for the (Training, Security, Rebuilding, Military Services, Logistics, our even the highest price our Veterans have paid for these wars? (Death) Mrs. Nancy Pelosi can come up with a huge stimulus package that costs American tax dollars but they do not establish a bill to make the Arabs pay back what they owe our Nation for efforts we have made creating a better world for them. Yet we continue sending them more money, then they ask for donations for more money! I'm still trying to figure out how it's the HOUSE SPEAKERS JOB to be in China when she is the United States House Speaker, not the President of United States or the Secretary of State who's job is to represent our country to China or other countries around the world.

These wars have made Oil Companies rich, Defense Contractors richer, destroyed our economy, banks, car manufactures, homes, jobs all been lost because people in Congress did not make the right bills. Everything was placed on US Americans instead of making the Prime Ministers of Iraq, Afghanistan and other Arab Kings Foot the bill in the trillions of dollars we paid. Hence, maybe it's not too late, for our Congress of the United States to act and try to get back some of billions or trillions of dollars we spent fighting these wars from countries like Iraq or Afghanistan so our country can get back on it's feet. If not then were just giving away free money, from our United States Congress to these Arab States. So then ask me again why I should donate, when I havn't been able to get a Car loan in the past 10 years, or when it's our congress hands out 4 billion dollars to General Motors without batting an eye! They have given billions to AIG, Mortgage Companies and banks yet when you apply for a bank loan or apply for car loan, they say your credit number prevents you from getting the loan. I still drive a car thats over 10 years old because when you do apply for loans they say NO. Why didn't our Congress say NO to giving away free billions of dollars to failing banks, failing mortgage companies, and failing car manufactures in the United States?

Sherrill
|
New York, USA
May 25, 2009

Sherrill in New York writes:

In the area of sharing Natural Resources: Safe drinking water for all. Let's NOT let the Corporations run away with the poor's ability to drink and irrigate their own lands. The rights of corporations and free commerce should NOT trump human rights. So a healthy does of collaboration could assure the proper amount of "checks & balances"

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
May 25, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Margrete O., The flip side of your attitude condems millions to death through starvation, malnutrition, disease, increased global conflict, and if you don't think that your way of thinking will come home to roost on our shores with tragic results, you are living a pipe dream.

Fact is we can deal with crisis here at the same time we help others in need.

Not only can we afford to do both, we must in the interest of our own national security.

I really don't think the UN is as you describe, but it could do with a healthy dose of "get a grip" and the common sense that paricular medicine brings to international relations and crisis.

As dysfuntional as the institution is, it still remains humanity's best hope for the family of nations, and our participation should reflect the level of funding we devote to it.

Want a more effective UN? Get the European side of NATO to take responsibility for leading all peacekeeping missions, with adequate troop contributions and logistics.

Run the opps like a military force going to war, instead of a Club Med. vacation and you won't have some 6 million dead in the Congo next time the proverbial dung hits the fan.

Masood
|
California, USA
May 26, 2009

Masood in California writes:

During hardship at home it is even harder to justify any help to a foreign country. However, attitude only changes when the dots are connected! The world is not that big after all! Not to mention North Korea busy blasting missiles when they have time between nuclear tests. One would assume a comprehensive national security policy ought to factor in competing international interests.

Secretary Clinton has made a difference in a short time. Her comments to the house foreign affairs committee that "I think that Pakistani government is basically abdicating to the Taliban and to the extremists" had a profound impact and a sudden realization of advancing extremism by Pakistani forces and the civilian government.

Good suggestion about the displaced people to house them through out Pakistan. But the concern is militants might infiltrate in an open refugee movement to the other cities.

Pakistan government has experience of refugees from a soviet war though the bigger challenge perhaps is cutting off the supplies to the militant from outside.

Government of Pakistan should set a timeline of operation in Swat. Secondly, restrict militants from spreading to other parts of the country. Thirdly, establish strong security and administrative system in the areas secured by the military operation,immediately. Any vacuum left will create problems again.

Ron
|
New York, USA
May 26, 2009

Ron in New York writes:

Af-PaK Colored-Stones Initiative.

DoS/USAID/Private Corps/NGO's partner to establish Afghan-Pak mining business in Colored-Stones. Build an economic base and prevent illicit trade into hands of AQI and Terror groups.

Zharkov
|
United States
June 23, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

"Public-private collaboration" had brought a communist revolution to Russia financed by New York bankers, war gas supplies to Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq, truck factories for Hitler's Nazi government, and nuclear reactors for North Korea.

It was "public-private collaboration" between the CIA and Osama bin Laden that gave birth to Al-Qaida.

Regarding North Korea, Don Rumsfeld was the man to stop a $200 million dollar contract to deliver equipment and services to build two light water reactor stations in North Korea in January 2000 when he was an executive director of ABB (Asea Brown Boveri). Wolfram Eberhardt, a spokesman for ABB confirmed that Rumsfeld was at nearly all the board meetings during his involvement with the company.

It was the Clinton administration, who in 1994 agreed to replace North Korea's domestically built nuclear reactors with light water nuclear reactors. So-called government-funded "experts" claimed that light water reactors couldn't be used to make bombs. Not true, according to Henry Sokolski, head of the Non-proliferation Policy Education Centre in Washington, who stated, "LWRs could be used to produce dozens of bombs worth of weapons-grade plutonium in both North Korea and Iran. This is true of all LWRs - a depressing fact U.S. policymakers have managed to block out.""These reactors are like all reactors, they have the potential to make weapons. So you might end up supplying the worst nuclear violator with the means to acquire the very weapons we're trying to prevent it acquiring," said Sokolski.

The U.S. State Department claimed that the light water reactors could not be used to produce bomb grade material and yet in 2002 urged Russia to end its nuclear co-operation with Iran for the reason that it didn't want Iran armed with weapons of mass destruction. At the time, Russia was building light water reactors in Iran. According to the State Department, light water reactors in Iran can produce nuclear material but somehow the same idea doesn?t apply in North Korea.

In April 2002, the Bush administration announced that it would release $95 million of American taxpayer's dollars to begin construction of the "harmless" light water reactors in North Korea. Bush argued that arming the megalomaniac dictator Kim Jong-Il with the potential to produce a hundred nukes a year was, "vital to the national security interests of the United States." Bush released even more money in January 2003, as was reported by Bloomberg News.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
May 26, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Masood in Calif., Aye well, I figure if folks wonder why I said what I said, they'll eventually connect the dots for themselves, as it's not my place to tell people how to think, I just hope I can get them to think....(chuckle).

If the obvious does need stating, then I would venture a guess that a connection between America's lack of foreign assistance to Afghanistan after the Soviet withdraw which left the Afghan people to sleep in the rubble of that conflict allowed the seeds of 9/11 to grow.

Lesson learned.

As for timelines in general, war is an unpredictable enterprise not given to concrete deadlines.

However, the Pak government did recently give a 10 day - 2 week estimate of regaining control of Swat, based upon their progress to date.

Suprise , Suprise, the Taliban are looking to try talking their way out of it now.

I say they're a day late and a dollar short for such nonsense.

Unconditional surrender on the other hand, would be a healthy choice for them to make at this point.

As for infiltration in the IDP population, I'm pretty sure the Pakistani people themselves can sort out the Taliban from the average citizen long before they offer them shelter.

I agree with you on Clinton's remarks, it was indeed a healthy dose of "get a grip" she injected into the mix.

We live in a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. Change is inevitable, peaceful change is desirable, and "democracy r us." sayeth the people.

Live it, love it, and defend it against all enemies, foreign and domestic.

Therin lies the simple formula for Pakistan's prosperity and continuity as a viable nation with a vested interest in their future peace of mind.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
May 27, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

People in the world have good hearts and have donated to good causes long as the cause was right. The point I'm trying to get across is you give money to aid the homeless, or research in cancer, or to starving families. We in the United States have faced many challenges, Hurricanes which left people homeless, or without food and water. I remember having one stripe on my uniform back in 1982, It was my first liberty call upon graduation and having orders to my next command. A Seaman Recruit, I attended Seaworld when approached by a woman who represented a kitchen downtown San Diego, Ca who cooked for the homeless. She was very nice and just asked if I could donate to help feed the homeless, thinking this lady must of had ESP or something because in the early years of the Navy, you had to wait until completing BOOT Camp before getting your first paycheck. I thought for a minute, then knew I had an extra 300.00 dollars cash and just handed it to her. She accepted the donation and asked If I would go to the kitchen. I politely said, "No Thanks but if it helps feed the homeless and makes someones day" it's all been worth it! The lady smiled and went on her way. There is always one person in the world knows when people give and in my opinion God keeps a better track than anyone! Have a wonderful day! God Bless!!!

Ahsan
|
Pakistan
May 27, 2009

Ahsan in Pakistan writes:

the problem basic is the recession today all economics is failed because of the non availability of jobs resources and security. unemployment and the underdeveloped cousntries left alone to fight with the problems they have. today Pakistan is at war if it comeout i say u the recession the world is facing can be overcome 100% jobs availability in the world market growth and banks which falls in bankruptcy will never happen and all people live their live in better economic manner.the main issue is that all donar agencies and countries tries to work at the upper level not to those who can help with forums we dont need the writes up it need implemetation. hope any one come up and i say the plan and the private and public partnership can help to eradicate the basic need of the people and poverty unemployment.

Ben
|
Maryland, USA
May 27, 2009

Ben in Maryland writes:

For public/private collaboration to be effective, you need to be working in an area where market forces are predominant (i.e. no endemic corruption or state-planned economies) and with clear, achievable metrics that can be indicative of success or flag problems. To me, this rules out working in refugees, which is largely dependent on external factors beyond the control of either party. Not that this work is unimportant, it's just more suited to public investment than private partnerships, which may be turned off at the inability to deal effectively with the conflict or crisis that is generating the refugee problem.

Both poverty alleviation and education efforts can draw on the strengths of private and public partners, and both also radically improve the economic prospects of the targeted population or nation. A smarter population provides more options for foreign direct investment, and a wealthier population can generate its own capital and begin solving its own problems. Efforts to combat diseases, while effective at the time, are ultimately doomed to failure without corresponding efforts in education and poverty alleviation (removing people from disease-ridden circumstance, or at least providing them with the knowledge to combat disease).

Thanks for this excellent blog.

Masood
|
California, USA
May 27, 2009

Masood in California writes:

@ Eric in Mexico, Your points are clear! No argument! However, suggestions may also have implications of whether explicitly or implicitly telling folks how to think!

Nevertheless, general experience indicates that many would prefer seeing a discrete picture since matters under discussion involves multiple nations with cause and effect scenarios.

Indeed for some it is obvious! But, primarily such issues are the function of one's background and the level of engagement at World Affairs. Blog such as Dipnote could be pivotal where State Department could not go into details explaining co-relations.

You are right war is an unpredictable enterprise! One would assume that you are right again Pakistani people or rather government would be able sort out the Taliban from the average citizen.

Zharkov
|
United States
May 28, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

Joseph Stiglitz estimates the total cost of the Iraq War at $3.0 trillion dollars. The cost of the Afghanistan War will probably exceed $1.0 trillion dollars. The cost of bailouts has been estimated to eventually reach $14 trillion dollars. Compare those numbers to the total GDP of America and you will see that Margrete O. in California has a valid argument.

The cost of the North Korean War will be even greater, now that we are at war with them (again), so it remains to be seen whether enough paper exists on this planet to print all the money we will need to save everyone.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
May 28, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Masood, I supose the rightness or wrongness of an idea becomes self evident upon validation through experiencing the human condition not only as we percieve it to be, but as we create it around us.

What you see is what you get.

If it looks like...smells like....tastes like....feels like...reality...it probably is.

I think.

Therefore I blog...(chuckle).

Dipnote is a public- private collaboration that sometimes reminds me of stone soup.

Destitute fellow walks into a strange destitute village with a huge cast iron pot, sets it down in the village square and sits down to catch his breath, then digs up up a smooth paving stone lying next to him and starts rubbing the dirt off of it.

All the villagers wonder what up and pretty soon a fairly perplexed person comes up with some water for the traveler ( as is the local custom). The destitute man drops the paving stone into the pot and then pours the water into it, says "thanks" and asks for a little more water to fill the pot full. The villager asks, "What up?""I'm making stone soup." he says.

"Is it good? We are very hungry.""There will be enough for everyone if I have more water."

The fellow gets more water and another person comes and asks "what up?".

"Stone Soup.""Is it good?""It's better hot than cold. Do you have wood for a fire?"

Pretty soon everyone is coming up to the fellow wondering what stone soup tastes like, and he sends them off on various little errands for this herb or that vegetable with the suggestion "it could be better if.." And the villagers also brought their own ideas of what tasted good and dropped them in the pot to boil.

While the debate raged over how to make the best tasting stone soup ever, the destitute man just pondered what he'd instigated and then quietly suggested it might be done and time to eat.

The whole village feasted when before no one had enough to cook a whole meal.

Word spread about stone soup in that destitute land and pretty soon it didn't seem so destitute for lack of understanding.

...to be cont.

In any case, I'm a New Mexican, not a politician...(chuckle).

What exactly "Political correctness" is I haven't a clue, but it encompasses a two hour disertation on the definition of "expletive deleted" that would not be publishable in polite company, diplomatic or otherwise anyway. So I just don't bother to go there and get stuck on traditional partisan political analogy.

I wonder how many would agree that we were born out of crisis, weened on crisis, cut our teeth on crisis, and if were wern't in crisis, we'd find a crisis to call our own, much to the world's humanitarian relief.

But I am sorely tempted to "lose my cool" and do a video-taped satire of bin laden climbing the mountain to the wise one's cave to ask him about the meaning of life. That is, if the President doesn't beat me to it next week. It's ok if he does, I'll bet he'll do it with much more eloquent justice than I could anyway...

Humor is in truth after all's said and done, the greatest threat to pissed-off preachers and idiots gathered in large numbers ever invented by humanity's survival instict.

Attitude is everything.

Where I come from, "Cowboy diplomacy" is all about mending fences and leading the herd to greener pastures.

Can't say as patience for outlaws and predators is in great supply, but we'll gladly lend them all the rope they need to hang themselves with.

Seems only fair.

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