How Best Can the International Community Support Security in Pakistan?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
April 24, 2009
Taliban Walking in Pakistan

The Taliban pose a serious threat to Pakistan and its neighbors. The United States is working with the governments in Afghanistan and Pakistan to counter these violent extremists and strengthen civil society and governance.

How best can the international community support security in Pakistan?

Comments

Comments

ilia
|
Puerto Rico
April 27, 2009

Ilia in Puerto Rico writes:

I firmly believe that in order for the Pakistani government to succeed against religious extremist they should correct their myopia and alter old politics. Otherwise Pakistan will remain backwards with archaic customs. A weak government cannot succeed. They should completely open to the International Community without fear that friendly nations will meddle into their sovereignty.

They must introduce change beginning with their military forces. The Pakistani government must unite and drive out all resistance movement with an aggresive detemination to crushed the opposition that deprive its people of their human rights. In a hot pursuit the evil forces of radical Islam wil gradually collapse.

India is not the problem. The problem is within themselves. On the contrary Pakistan should thrive for a peaceful co-existence with friendly neighboring countries. In order to enjoy a true democracy of economic, cultural, education and true religion, the complex and deep-rooted resistance movements must be wiped out belligerently.

Their principles of defence must be firm not vague.

John
|
Greece
April 27, 2009

John in Greece writes:

@ Tad in Ohio -- With all the respect, you are not fair enough with Donald. Of course he knows the difference between a country and a continent. Do YOU know the difference between FBI and CIA?

QUOTE: Tad in Ohio writes:
@ Donald in Virginia. First of all Donald, go back to Geography class. Africa is a CONTINENT, not a COUNTRY. And as for the FBI investigating arms dealers in foreign countries. Why waste the FBI's time like that? END OF QUOTE.

This is certainly not a polite way of debating.

Donald, obviously, wrote so by "typing too" quickly, but he surely knows! I think that it's too "cheap" to say that he can't define, whether something is a country or a continent, especially if you read his archived posts.

FYI: FBI acts within the States (federally) and CIA (now off the record): although cannot act outside U.S.A. _ MUST AND SHOULD ACT everywhere, when there are international "dangers" that you have to face them overseas -- ex. guns emporium! All of which means that it's a CIA scope and not an FBI one. Now you see the difference between FBI and CIA? ON and OFF the record?
So, you make mistakes too! All of us do!

I mean that he says something important no matter if you call it FBI, CIA, NSA, a country or a continent. 'Cause it's called WORLD & DEFENSE;.

Best Regards! Just a note, I hope you do not misunderstand me.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
April 27, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

BRAVO ZULU @ JOHN IN GREECE

I was reserving to comment on the Africa issue, especially when most people in the United States were not even aware that the 7 points crown on the Statue of Liberty equal the 7 CONTINENTs of the world. However, what is more pressing isn't whether Africa is a country or a continent, it's how these Nations are able to get Weapons and use them on innocent poeople?

In reference to the Country of Pakistan -- I believe there should be a mobile port authority that utilizes the United States Naval Fleet to help search and discover whats on those cargo ships which are about to enter Africa or Pakistan, and other countries which have been known to have terrorist activity. This would be ideal to slow down the existing weapons getting into the wrong hands.

Satellite coverage will not be enough -- it will need many of our United States Destroyers and Cruisers to keep an eye on things. Security measures will be need to be on full alert around the area where the Pirates continue causing problems.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
April 27, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ John, If I remember correctly, the FBI provided forensics teams in both the Marriot hotel bombing in Pakistan as well as the Mumbai massacre, primarily due to the fact that Americans were involved.

Short of Scotland Yard, they have the best forensics ability on the planet to trace the source of an explosive by its molecular composition, and their detective work is second to none.

So Donald was not off the mark on his statement, the traditional deliniation of "territory" between CIA and FBI has been rendered moot by 9/11 and executive orders mandating the sharing of information between branches of the intel community. They still have their areas of expertise, but it's a team effort these days. One reason why we haven't had another 9/11 on US soil.

Anyway, back to the topic question, Ilia in Puerto Rico writes:

"I firmly believe that in order for the Pakistani government to succeed against religious extremist they should correct their myopia and alter old politics. Otherwise Pakistan will remain backwards with archaic customs. A weak government cannot succeed. They should completely open to the International Community without fear that friendly nations will meddle into their sovereignty."

I totally agree with this, and thanks Ilia for expressing in plain English why I thought Pakistan should be offered the protection of NATO under some form of "provisional membership", the provision being that what threatens Pakistan threatens everyone else, so it is logical that "an attack on one is an attack on all", and the basis for NATO is all about supporting common security.

We've got NATO doing exactly that, right next door in Afghanistan. I don't think its too much of a stretch to widen the area of opps if the Pakistani government felt comfortable with such an arrangement.

Anyone care to weigh in on this possible solution?

Anna
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 27, 2009

Anna in Washington, DC writes:

@ Donald in VA -- I agree with you about the arms traders. They are a huge problem, but that is more global than specific to Pakistan.

In regards to the situation in Pakistan, I think there is less support for the Taliban than we think. CNN's National Security Reporter writes on 4/27 that (quote) "support for suicide bombing among Pakistanis had dropped from 33 percent in 2002 to 5 percent in 2008, according to the Pew Global Attitudes survey, and favorable views of Osama bin Laden and the Taliban have steadily eroded." (end quote) Maybe there is hope for Pakistan's future.

masood
|
California, USA
April 28, 2009

Masood in California writes:

The question, how best! Can the international community support security in Pakistan? Seems straight forward and has been repeatedly posed in last several years. However, despite of U.S. and Pakistan appeals threat is even more serious than before.

Prior to giving my take on this complex situation I would like to ask couple of questions myself!

As it has been pointed out in the comments and general observation also lead us to believe that Taliban are not sophisticated and do not have advanced technology at their disposal. Than while living in sixteenth century mind-set and without resources how they are resisting Pakistan army and the United States?

Secondly, who is included in international community? Or do we primarily mean western countries in the international community?

Do we have everyone on board to stop this advancing threat? Apparently, looks like neighbors haven't bought the idea of serious threat to them.

It seems like some of the countries in the region have aligned their own interest along with Taliban and supporting them in the process!

Taliban along with their own agenda are serving as a tool for the third party! Systematic attacks on NATO and U.S. forces with consistent terror attacks inside Pakistan indicate a pattern.

Simply one has to reevaluate if Taliban have the resources to fight Pakistani army and U.S.?

It is almost like reversal of the history where U.S. and other countries were supporting Mujahidin to fight against Soviet invasion in Afghanistan. Now, some other forces are supporting Taliban to fight against United States.

Options:

The dilemma!

Should United States count on Pakistan army and political leadership to defeat Taliban and strengthen civil society in given circumstances?

If U.S. goes full strength the situation will get even worst than Iraq ultimately losing the access to the region. Perhaps some of the regional powers are waiting for this predicament where they can pull U.S. into a never ending perpetual door to door combat.

If U.S. increases the drone attack policy as a containment or disruption chances are that will destabilize the internal situation due to anti American sentiment in Pakistan beyond the control of their civilian and military leaders.

Solution to the problem as Hillary Clinton said should be smart one, state of the art.

International community would be able to best serve if somehow regional interest are not in play in such condition Pakistan alone can take care of the situation.

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
April 28, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

Thanks Anna in Washington DC

I think we all want all Arab States to succeed without violence, without suicide bombers, without IED's, without the use of force which destroys human life.

In this day and age we cannot be naive to think that for every action there is always an equal or greater reaction. If the Pakistan Government was more tough against TERRORISTS the world would be a safer place for everyone!

Anna I hope you also can understand that even the media doesn't report all the news or sometimes even misleads the news. It's our troops in Afghanistan that come under fire from Taliban that have been trained in Pakistan. We all can hope that the end for the Taliban is near and the Pakistan Military will be more vigil about arresting those terrorists and locking them up before they act out in future.

The bottom line is we all should strive for a safer world, less violence, less wars, people on the planet should find solutions to problems not pick-up arms and destroy or cause destruction on mankind or womankind. The true evil doers are the Arms Dealers who sell weapons to anyone in the world and take no accountablity or responsibility for those actions when they are only concerned about greed or money sales.

Hence you stop the flow of weapons, devices, RPG's, arriving in those countries, then you place a damper on their ability to use those weapons against our troops.

SA
|
New Jersey, USA
April 28, 2009

S.A. in New Jersey writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico. On the question of giving Pakistan provisional membership in Nato. I believe this could be an effective and executable solution to help address Pakistan's long-term security concerns especially with respect to Iran to the West and India to the South-East. Pakistan was previously a member of CENTO which was a precursor to NATO, however ultimately became part of the nonaligned movement on back of socialist outlook of Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (Benizar Bhutto's father) and therefore never joined Nato.

Addressing Pakistan's long-term security interest will allow reduction in the influence of the Pakistan Army and development of a multi-institutional democracy. The aim should be to take Pakistan back to its conceived purpose as a secular country for muslims of South Asia not an islamic state.

Ron
|
New York, USA
April 28, 2009

Ron in New York writes:

Stop Funding Corruption.

Pakistan has been playing the USG on terrorism since 9/11. Billions have been poured in by U.S. to staunch the Taliban/AQ;violence and we see more terrorism than ever. So....if money is gasoline, stop pouring it on the fire. More importantly, do not be drawn into a broader war ie. Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos...remember George Santayana's quote: "those who forget the past; are doomed to repeat it."

Karl
|
Virginia, USA
April 28, 2009

Karl in Virginia writes:

Teach girls how to read.

Reign in rogue nations and intelligence agencies.

Hold international donors to their word.

Build roads, clinics, schools, irrigation systems; and teach people how to be doctors and (non-opiate) farmers.

Patty W.
|
Texas, USA
April 28, 2009

Patty W. in Texas writes:

Education of children, especially girls, is the first step. Next is to assure opportunity for all Pakistanis so families can continue to survive. Young men must be able to envision a viable productive future or they will be tempted to extremism and violence.

Education - Opportunity - Productive Future

Patricia S.
|
New York, USA
April 29, 2009

Patricia S. in New York writes:

Give young girls and women more opportunities to learn to read and then allow them to lead in all activities of daily living. Everyone will benefit from the moment that teaching begins.

Colleen
|
India
May 1, 2009

Colleen in India writes:

NATO forces should battle the extremists with ground troops and special forces in the NW territories in Pakistan, with special attention to the Swat Valley. They can do so under the cover of solving a 'humanitarian crisis' as refugees have moved out of the area. Furthermore, the opium drug trade needs to be stopped, and the international community should put pressure on China to control the demand side. In addition, Pakistan's poverty, lack of infrastructure, and class warfare needs to be addressed.

Colleen
|
India
May 1, 2009

Colleen in India writes:

In keeping with the State Department's three-fold mission of defense, diplomacy, and development, I offer a three-fold solution.

Militarily, we should recongnize that the infamous peace treaty was between the Islamabad government and the Taliban. The loophole is so big that you could drive NATO ground and air forces through it, and that's precisely what we should do. Drones are bad publicity and should never take the place of forces on the ground.

Has anyone noticed that while the rest of the world screamed about the horrors in Swat Valley and Buner, China seemed strangely silent? In fact, the silence from Beijing was deafening. Could it be that they want Islamabad to fall to the Taliban? At least then they would have easy access to Pakistan's opium. However, no one dares approach Cgina because everyone owes them too much money. Questions should be asked, and China's assistance needs to be summoned in tackling the drug problem.

Pakistan's infrastructure needs help, particularly in the villages. Schools, for girls and boys, and not only madrassas, need to be built. The political system which only encourages the widening gap between rich and poor, needs an overhaul. We need to replace the rhetoric of the Taliban-as-Robin-Hood with ground-up changes that don't necessitate extremist thinking. Power plants should be built, with farmers getting adequate compensation for use of the land for development. This is one area, however, that should come from within Pakistan, with assistance with the international community.

Pakistan needs to stop behaving like India's lawless little brother. A comprehensive plan like this is greatly needed in fulfilling that objective.

Alice
|
California, USA
June 24, 2009

Alice in California writes:

The best way to get this situation under control is as follows:
1. Put the Too Big to Fail Banks into Bankruptcy protection. 2. Pass the Home Owners and Bank Protection Act as proposed by Lynden laRouche. 3. Make a treaty with Russia, China and India, so that the United States will issue credit for A. itself B. Russia, China and India, as is permitted by the American Constitution in Dollars. With the U.S. Economy thus stablized, and in concert the economies of Russia, China and India, because the credit that will be uttered will be for things we need on this planet such a nuclear power plants, nuclear powered desalination plants and the world wide mag lev railroad system, plus other vital infrastructure projects worldwide, keeping the U.S. citizens in their homes, properly employed and with their benefits intact, the U.S. Government will be in a good position to make arrangements with strong nations, including Iran to join in with the new credit system, which will replace the old Venetian style monetary system as promoted by the Anglo Dutch oligarchs, i.e. the dreaded bankers, the Goldman Sachs, the P.Morgan Chases, the remains of Citi Corpts etc etc. who all will be dealing with the fact that their time is up. We must stop the heroin leaving Pakistan and Afganistan, we must stop the growing of the opium poppy crops and get rid of all drug trafficking world wide, because this drug money is what is financing all these endless wars and causing chaos everywhere. Read the larouchepac.com articles on these sumjects and you will get the whole picture.
Best regards. Alice Wolf.
Do it you all, get it right for once.

joe
|
Tennessee, USA
May 1, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

Why not build an American zone as in Tel Avaiv?

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