What Is the Most Important Aspect of the U.S.-Mexico Relationship?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 20, 2009
Zocalo Main Square in Mexico City

U.S. relations with Mexico have a direct impact on the lives and livelihoods of millions of Americans – whether the issue is trade and economic reform, homeland security, drug control, migration, or the promotion of democracy. At the invitation of Mexican Foreign Secretary Patricia Espinosa, Secretary Clinton will travel to Mexico City and Monterrey, Mexico from March 25-26, 2009.

What is the most important aspect of the U.S.-Mexico relationship?

Comments

Comments

Nomsa
|
California, USA
March 24, 2009

Nomsa in California writes:

The current drug war with Mexico jeopardizes the integrity of the border between the two countries, and by extension, strains trade agreements between the two countries and generally undermines the economic and physical safety of each country individually. It is hard to maintain equal standing when the security of each country (i.e. economic, physical and in terms of power) is so uneven. Thanks for asking!

Marty
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 24, 2009

Marty in Washington, DC writes:

We must stop illegal drug trafficking and related gang activity -- in Mexico AND in AMERICA.

Maslow's hierarchy is broken -- security is fleeting for many poor at the borders -- WE MUST WORK TOGETHER TO HELP PROVIDE A SECURE SYSTEM FOR THE PUBLIC TO WORK IN THE BORDER AREAS.

Our best tools to battle murder and drugs, and related illegal activities, is to promote education, and culturally shared values. We have much at stake.

THE GREED BEHIND DRUGS AND ASSOCIATED ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES CAN ONLY BE CONQUERED BY EDUCATING AND CREATING A GREATER GOOD BASED ON TRUST AND SHARING.

Violence begets violence.

Drugs destroy morality.

But this world is a little too small to keep build fences.

You cannot on one day say, "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall" and then spout "let's build a fence!" How moronic.

We must build more suitable commerce. Enact funding and tax breaks for border state industry that self-manifests communities of high standard, provides upward mobility for workers, and promotes leaders of civic value.

Rosemary
|
New Jersey, USA
March 24, 2009

Rosemary in New Jersey writes:

John in Greece said "...securing American-Mexican border line is vital, especially if you also consider the fact that this way you actually secure other possible "danger corridors" from South America (Venezuela, etc.). Unfortunately, this border line is really big to be secured only from the one side (U.S.). That's why the key word is: Collaboration! Mexico must try hard too!"

You're right! We also (and I know this is a little off-topic) need to worry about the really really big border north of us also. While all the fireworks are going off to the south, we should not ignore the fact that there are population centers very close to the Canadian border that are heavily Muslim, in the Rochester, NY area for example and in the Great Lakes region. I could never figure out why they would settle there. I hope it is not to secure a network of safe houses for terrorists coming down from the north.

I do not mean to imply that Islamic communities in the U.S. are necessarily radical, but it would be easy for cells to blend in.

So, while we are figuring out what to do in the south, be should be considering a model that is practical and applicable along the northern border as well.

Rosemary
|
New Jersey, USA
March 24, 2009

Rosemary in New Jersey writes:

Oh! And Hillary, I also meant to wish you Bon Voyage and Good Luck. I'll be watching as usual. You are doing an awesome job! (I am not surprised in the least). You are doing us proud! Go Hillary!

John
|
Texas, USA
March 24, 2009

John in Texas writes:

I believe that the most important thing we can do for our relationship with Mexico is to find a way to reduce the demand for illegal drugs on the U.S. side of the border.

Cindy
|
District Of Columbia, USA
April 7, 2009

Cindy in Washington writes:

my husband has been deported , my kids and I are here with out a husband or father, his paper are at the mexican emebbsey for the last 4 months , why are familys being apart because paper work takes so long cost, so much, can't get a pass, can you please tell me and my kids why, there are so many family like us

Patrick
|
Maryland, USA
March 25, 2009

Patrick in Maryland writes:

I think it's the "love Fest" that the United States and Mexico, have for each other.:) This makes for a great relationship .

Have a great Visit to Mexico .

Cya :)

Racje;
|
Texas, USA
March 25, 2009

Racje in Texas writes:

The joint problem wiht human and drug trafficking begins with a earnest evaluation of the problem. There is no one simple cause nor solution. It begins with attacking the economical problems of mexico, the excalation in dangerous arms and violence, the high U.S.A. demand of drugs, and many other aspects. I believe that sometimes we try to patch our problems in Mexico inadequately. We put a band-aid on a broken limb. We seriously have to recreate and rethink some of our methods of attack. This might inculde taking responisbility of the drug trade and dealing with some serious moral issues of drug policies in the U.S. It might mean truely studying the complex system of drug lords, cartels, and their associated gangs. We will have to be very creative in our aid to mexico's evloving goverment, so that imbeded corrupt systems do not hinder nor counter improvement. It will also mean being more creative and supportve on our trade and commerce relations to try to assit Mexican economy will not impeding on our own.

In terms on illegal immigration, I think attitudes on both sides need to be read justed. I personally believe that Texas being a minority-majority state is by far more benifical in a cultural context. It provides a great mix of culture and languages. If any one has ever tried learing another language it is quite a challege. If we expect the major infulx of immigrants to assimilate into American society, we have to be welcoming and prepared for the changes. We need the infrastucture to support our desires. More programs in schools and in the community to help teach english are needed. If immigrants know the language they can be a more active participant in American society. Also, maybe this immigration is an opportunity to cause some positive changes in our own society. For example, having biligual schools can be an asset. American children can be learning spanish, english, french, and other languages. Being bi or triligual, strengthens, not degrades, our understaning of a global society. As for immigrant perspective, responsiblities and honest efforts are expected for a transformation of a more active american citizen. Indeed, immigrants will have to claim and recognize their newfounded American roots and responibilites to propel America forward.

Elizabeth
|
Oklahoma, USA
March 25, 2009

Elizabeth in Oklahoma writes:

The most critical aspect of the U.S./Mexico relationship is the unrealized potential for sustainable economic and community development that lies in wait on the borderlands of two great nations. Divided artificially by a geopolitical boundary, a people seeks unification. Through unification life is worth cultivating, opportunities are sought, and a better life is cultivated by those individuals who can once again dream of a future worthy of their child. Such a vision of the future is etched in the pysche of every American and with that in clear view, we owe it to our neighbors to not taunt them with it but rather model it.

Standing at the turning point of an unimaginably perilous future if we are to secure anyone's future, we must create, enact and evaluate new forms of cooperation aimed at sustainability connecting policies with the shared purposes of our neighbors and situate these projects in the border region. Rather than reinforce, police and or dominate the boundaries that aritificially divide a people, whey not channel the impulse into something positive that will invariably improve life outcomes among citizens in the border regions. Let's use some of the stimulus dollars to fund strucural projects, that are ultimately co-produced, coregulated. Such collaboration would offer a model for other communities in multiple sites along the border. Imagine medical clinics straddling border communities, literacy centers, and other social, economic and civic capacity projects conveniently situated that at once commence to improve the brown fields and establish cooperative agricultural production. Such an effort will go much further than doubling the numbers of border agents, patrols, and arresting officers.

All we need to do is think outside the box and interpollate trade agreements into structural agreements. By promoting participatory forms of binational cooperation in situated agency we should expect to see a decline in the informal and illicit economies filling developments' void.

Ernesto
|
Arizona, USA
March 25, 2009

Ernesto in Arizona writes:

Get an agreement in which are the priorities in both sides, from either side: Drugs Traffic?; International Commerce?; Security?; Illegal Inmigration?; NAFTA?; Workers Ammensty?; Turism?; Oil Production?; Else?

Have been themes of discussion for the last 100 years and every 4, 6 or 8 years the topics, views and reviews change to get, sometimes, to "death ends" up to the "next" time....

While, both countries, talk to a deaf interlocutor !!!! Will it happen again?

Concept C.
March 25, 2009

C.C. writes:

Here the major concern will be the drug control and even the homeland security. If these concerns are solved, then we can say that there is way out through the relationship.

Bill
|
Tennessee, USA
March 25, 2009

Bill in Tennessee writes:

About stopping or slowing the supply of illegal (or legal) drugs or anything else: Forget it as long as there is a demand. All the money, time & effort at limiting supply has always been and always will be a total waste. Instead, 100% of money, time & effort directed at minimizing demand will have at least a like dimunition of supply. The best known ways of limiting demand is intervention, rehabilitation, education and any other means possible.

Sonny
|
Massachusetts, USA
March 25, 2009

Sonny in Massachusetts writes:

We have to help Mexico in order to help ourselves. It also broadens to help ourselves in home too. If arms trafficking is the problem we should understand first how it gets out from the manufacturers hands to these traffickers. We should first fix the root cause rather than chasing the peak of this pyramid. The very many small problems lies at the bottom of the pyramid which if resolve one at a time may significantly reduce the big ones. Lets try to fix our arms policy of manufacturing and distributing it.

Carlos
|
Texas, USA
March 25, 2009

Carlos in Texas writes:

Ms.Hillary, congratulations on your appointment and I am confident that you are the best choice as Secretary of State Mexico continues to be an enigma for Americans because most of it's law enforcement departments continue to be underpaid, badly trained, and worst of all picked at random any college graduate in Mexico would never join their ranks unless He (She) had no other option corruption has been rooted since the PRI was in power and can't be instilled today due to the fact that there is no social justice in Mexico the minimum wages are so low that people are desperate to get a good meal and take care of their families no matter what that's why as soon as they are offered a job by the cartels they take it regardless of what happens after they have no faith in the legal system and they know more of what is happening than any American agency I just went to Chihuahua and in conversations with regular folks I was told that there is a Cartel war in Juarez and Chihuahua city due to the fact that Chapo Guzman was let out since he controlled the drug traffic in those cities when he was arrested another cartel took over the drug trade and when he came out he wanted it back but the opposite cartel refused and they started the war killing each others dealers they also own a large part of the business recently in Chihuahua a restaurant owned by Chapo was burned to the ground and also they started the protection rackets to distract the public killing inocent business men to force the business owners to complain to the government to try and focus law enforcement on this crime rather than the drug trade I was told that cartel members were government law enforcement agents at one time or another and keep close contact with their buddy's getting info and putting them on the payroll. I am just an employee and I found all this in 7 days. I feel the most important aspect of U.S. -Mexico relationship would be to hold the Mexican law enforcement agencies accountable for daily activities and monitor all their agents daily to wipe out corruption which is the no 1 reason criminals are active and profitable in Mexico.

Ralph
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 25, 2009

Ralph in Washington, DC writes:

Bill in Tennessee writes: About stopping or slowing the supply of illegal (or legal) drugs or anything else: Forget it as long as there is a demand. All the money, time & effort at limiting supply has always been and always will be a total waste. Instead, 100% of money, time & effort directed at minimizing demand will have at least a like dimunition of supply. The best known ways of limiting demand is intervention, rehabilitation, education and any other means possible..

How will the Chruchs pay for their new additions?

Pete
|
Kentucky, USA
March 25, 2009

Pete in Kentucky writes:

The most important aspect of relations between the U.S. and Mexico is the drug trade and illegal immigration. It is very true what President Obama and Secretary Clinton have said that demand for drugs in the U.S. is the reason for the problems Mexico is having with the drug cartels. Much like the Oil barons in the middle east we the U.S. are making these people rich and that money gives them power. But one people fail to realze is that our own war on drugs fails on a daily basis because we are too easy on U.S. drug dealers and abusers. If we beef up our enforcement and put stiff penalties with no chance for early release we would maybe do some good. Right now a person is picked up for dealing drugs and may get as little as a fine and at most even after three strikes maybe a twenty year sentence that they get out of in two. Even if they stay in prison they get so many liberties that life inside is easier and safer then what they had on the outside. The other thing is illegal immigration now the tide is stemming because there is no money to be had by the illegals lets take that lesson and take away the incentive to come to the U.S. illegally. Fine companies who hire illegals to the point of putting them out of buisiness or make them pay to get the illegals they employ the documentation necesarry to work in the U.S.

richard s.
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 25, 2009

Richard S. in Washington writes:

Hillary, you ROCK! You deserve every bit of the adulation and respect you got as a candidate and Senator. The ONLY way we as a global people are going to get through all these issues: drugs, climate, trade, health, poverty etc. is to work from the standpoint of goodwill. You went a long way toward opening the door to Mexico's good will, which we desperately need. Thanks,

Matt
|
California, USA
March 25, 2009

Matt in California writes:

I very much agree with most of the postings below. However, I do have a question? Maybe somebody can elaborate on it a little more...? If the United States were to build the wall along U.S./Mexican border, how will that affect our relationship with our neighbors...? In all aspects? Trade, economically, terms of security...? How will Mexican officials respond? Do we depend on them as much as they depend on us?

Lisa B.
|
California, USA
March 25, 2009

Lisa B. in California writes:

What is the most important aspect of the U.S.-Mexico relationship?

None.

How about protecting the border against these criminally-minded illegals, and keep American jobs for Americans not illegals?!?!!!!!!

Samm
|
California, USA
March 25, 2009

Samm in California writes:

Wow!! I cannot believe these Anti-American and Pro-Mexican rants I'm reading. Please tell me there is a filter on this site that's deleting all the comments that's against blaming America for Mexico's drug wars!?!? I can't believe people are so misinformed, and idiotic. Blaming the U.S. for troubles of Mexico is ridiculous. Why not blame and punish America for having Democracy that's gravitating these illegals to come here illegally. These drug smugglers come here to the U.S. to run from their debt in Mexico, and the violence follows them. The U.S. has more people on prescription drugs than illegal drugs...so don't blame me or any American for Mexico's drug war troubles. Also, instead of fighting Mexico's war what about the issues here in America? And no we don't depend on Mexico as much as they need us. Most produce except California comes from Florida, and other South American countries...Mexico is about 5%. We only need Mexicans when they arrive here illegally and we then use them for slave wages. Stop blaming America since you have this resentment towards America then leave!!

Chris M.
|
California, USA
March 25, 2009

Chris M. in California writes:

We have to help Mexico in order to help ourselves.
----------
Are you serious!?!? Anyway, to state that gun control is needed due to the drug wars is insane. So you're saying as an American my right to bare arms ( 2nd Amendment) should be taken away because of some Mexican drug war??!? This has nothing to do with the rights of Americans. So I should lose my constitutional rights here in America because of Mexico? Do you see the justice in that?? Will Mexico change its ways for the U.S? No. Because it wouldn't make sense. It's a sad state the direction this country has turned, and what's scarier is that many of the people who voted are on this blog.

Randy
|
Virginia, USA
March 26, 2009

Randy in Virginia writes:

What is important to U.S. Mexican relations is for America to stay a dominate force in the world rather than being sold down the river by the blame America first crowd. Madam Clinton really is diplorable in her comments disparaging the U.S. Madam Clinton some of us out here still like our country and believe in American exceptionalism.

Gina
|
California, USA
March 26, 2009

Gina in California writes:

The most important aspect of the U.S.-Mexico relationship would be to take a less active role in trying to solve all of Mexico's problems, for instance the thoroughly corrupt government, encouraging the most impoverished people to come to America to take advantage of all of the free social, health and educational programs. We should fortify the border and treat it as any other country in the world would and that is to control who and what comes into our country to ensure our ecomomy, resources, sovereignty and most of all security.

We have tons of gang criminals here who prey on innocent citizens. These criminals come and go across the border freely with little concern of capture due to our lax attitude much of it enforced by MALDF, LA RAZA and of course the ACLU. They comprise a main population in our prison systems and jails. We spend billions a year on illegal aliens and it is simply not fair when California is in such poor shape to have to ask the tax payer to support another country, to subsidise in effect. Their President has been quick to point fingers at the U.S. Any time there is failure to make life easier for the people that are illegally here. The reason he commands so much interest in our relationship is because the "workers" in the U.S. send billions home to Mexico. He is reliant on finances. He needs to fix his own country without relying on the U.S. for everything. He should engage, train, educate, feed, provide housing and employment, teach environmental values to his people maybe then they would be happy to stay in Mexico. I would gladly buy merchandise from Mexico rather than China and pay more for it too. Why out source when you can provide jobs, produce a product, market it and export it.

It is all so preventible. If we safe guarded the California border and did not let the Mexican president preside and dictate the shape of our relationship with the United States then perhaps our State might have a chance to concentrate on the problems that are abundant here.

Debbie
|
Minnesota, USA
March 26, 2009

Debbie in Minnesota writes:

Ms. Clinton -- thank you very much for beginning this conversation with Mexico -- a direct, respectful and transparent conversation. Al Jazeera reported that "nine out of 10 guns retrieved from crime scenes in Mexico are traced back to U.S. gun dealers." So, by you stating that Americans are at fault for the high demand for drugs from Mexico is just the tip of the iceberg. Thank you very much for standing up for the truth -- by admitting we contribute to drug-violence south of our borders. In this way we can take responsibility for our actions on a national level. You are a great example of an American.

Robert
|
California, USA
March 26, 2009

Robert in California writes:

Madame Secretary: I am glad you have gone to Mexico to show support for Mexico to reduce the drug violence along our boarders, its is time to create jobs and prosperity in Mexico and help their citizens find a better life.

joe
|
Tennessee, USA
March 26, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

Please forgive the sarcasm; but, I'm so sick of the hypocrisy regarding everything from trade, corruption, labor rights in Mexico, human rights in Mexico, distribution of wealth in Mexico and US proposed non involvement both commercially and politically::: how many lies can administration after administration cover up? How many DEA and FBI agents have paid for this under the table, long surviving sanction with Mexico? It was OPENLY sanctioned during one U.S. Presidents Administration.

Amazing how Mexico wins both ways...

Amazing how the country that is said to create the problem ... pays both ways...U.S.A.

Amazing, Mexico pays nothing but in lives it does not attempt to democratically support to begin with...

The Church comment by Ralph: Amazing how the Church wins both ways as well...makes you wonder if there is really a separation between Church and State except in a protectionist, profit oriented manner does it not? Then again, it is about choice?

Stan
|
New York, USA
April 7, 2009

Stan in New York writes:

Robert in California writes:

Madame Secretary: I am glad you have gone to Mexico to show support for Mexico to reduce the drug violence along our boarders, its is time to create jobs and prosperity in Mexico and help their citizens find a better life.

Posted on Thu Mar 26, 2009

Debbie in Minnesota writes:

Ms. Clinton -- thank you very much for beginning this conversation with Mexico -- a direct, respectful and transparent conversation. Al Jazeera reported that "nine out of 10 guns retrieved from crime scenes in Mexico are traced back to U.S. gun dealers." So, by you stating that Americans are at fault for the high demand for drugs from Mexico is just the tip of the iceberg. Thank you very much for standing up for the truth -- by admitting we contribute to drug-violence south of our borders. In this way we can take responsibility for our actions on a national level. You are a great example of an American.

Posted on Thu Mar 26, 2009
-----------------------------------

That's right go ahead and blame America for the world's problems. Why should America cater to Mexico's needs and wants when here in America we have our own issues that have yet to be addressed. What about creating jobs and prosperity for the millions of Americans first before we attempt to do this for another country?!?!? Why should America have to build jobs in Mexico? We are losing jobs here!!!! If they can't stand on their own as a nation then maybe Mexico should become a territory of the U.S. not a Commonwealth but give all its power to the U.S. And not all guns come from the U.S. You Liberals on here act as if Mexico doesn't trade with the rest of South America. The U.S. has a very small part -- very small. When are people going to stop blaming others and America for their OWN problems? What if the Mexican President stop looking for a handout from the America and learn how to enrich and lead his country rather being a puppet to America? If the borders were protected like Fort Knox there's no way the crime would escalate to these border towns, yet no one wants to talk about that.

Lee J.
|
California, USA
March 26, 2009

Lee J. writes:

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton:

I agree with Hillary Clinton that it's our fault concerning the 'Drug Wars' in Mexico. It's our fault in the sense we allow millions of illegals to enter this country each year because we refuse to protect the borders. It's our fault that when the Mexican president can't handle its own people that we allow him to throw them off on the American tax-payer, which drains us with them receiving free healthcare, housing, medicaid, welfare,financial aid for school, and social security. It's our fault that we allow many Americans to lose their jobs just before retirement to low wage illegals. So yes, I agree with Hillary Clinton it's America's fault for allowing this to go one for so many years.

Proud to be an American,

Lee J.

Adolfo C.
|
Mexico
March 26, 2009

Adolfo in Mexico writes:

The most important aspect of the Mexico-United States relationship is the different point of view of both countries for many affairs...I think northamericans sould look at us as partners and not as competitors...workers go to search for a job and are not criminals...the relationships with Mexico sould be seen as a homeland security of the U.S. and in that way, try to understand that mexicans want a better relation with this country, but respecting traditions and development. thanks a lot

Normita
|
California, USA
March 26, 2009

Normita in California writes:

One of the most important aspects of the U.S.-Mexico relationship is the stabilization of the immigration issue. If both countries do not address this unilaterally, there will be a continuing struggle on drugs, trade, to mention just a few.

Madam Secretary, thank you for your service to our country.

Normita, a proud hillaryvillager

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