What Actions Should the International Community Take To Resolve the Situation in Darfur?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 13, 2009
Girl Struggles Against Sand Storm in Darfur Refugee Camp

Earlier this week, U.S. Ambassador to the UN Susan Rice said, “I think it’s imperative that the African Union and its member states, the OIC, the Arab League come together and deliver a very clear message to the [Sudanese] government that they will not tolerate and stand by while over a million African Muslims are at risk of urgent death. The United States will review with our partners here in the Security Council what next steps we think are most appropriate, but I can assure you that the United States takes this very seriously and will act accordingly.”

What actions should the international community take to resolve the situation in Darfur?

Comments

Comments

Wendy
|
California, USA
March 17, 2009

Wendy in California writes:

In her remarks with Irish Foreign Minister Martin, SecState Hillary said,"I spent a lot of time in particular with women, Catholic and Protestant, who were working to build bridges in their own communities, to find common ground as mothers and wives, and to create conditions for peace from the ground up."

I first thought about the Middle East, but now it occurs to me that it might be useful to have a set of Irish women -- not politicians, but just folk -- go to Darfur or a neighboring country with refugees and women too from the dominating side. These women as parents could have a conference about how they helped foster peace in Ireland and *how* women could build similar bridges in Darfur. Not just one big meeting, but a week or a weekend with breakout sessions. It could help a lot.

A follow-up meeting four months after would be important. Maybe some of the Darfur women and the 'opposing' women could go to Ireland for the second meeting. Then in four months after that, a meeting back in or near Darfur. And so on.

Katie-Jay S.
|
California, USA
March 17, 2009

Katie-Jay in California writes:

I think that the U.S. Administration needs to:

1. Appoint a special envoy to Darfur and Sudan.
2. Support the ICC and the indictment of al-Bashir
3. Ensure the protection of the innocent civilians of Darfur and provide adequate support to the UNAMID Peacekeeping mission.
4. Work with other nations to create a road map for peace in Darfur and Sudan with multilateral pressure points and incentives.
5. Prepare a credible range of options for the use of military force to protect civilians and ensure the unobstructed delivery of humanitarian assistance.

Maria
|
Pennsylvania, USA
March 17, 2009

Maria in Pennsylvania writes:

Please end the genocide in Darfur... Have we forgotten the Holocaust so soon?

Where will this genocide lead our world? Come on--- do something!

Ole
|
New York, USA
March 17, 2009

Ole in New York writes:

Unfortunately, i'm afraid women in Sudan proper are on the side of regime and its policies. remember, this is a relgious fundamentalist government, practicing attitudes not far dufferent from hamas, hezbollah and Al-Qaeda, and according to their system of values, a mother should be proud if her son kills heathens, or dies fighting them. those who think otherwise are in deep deep underground in that country. I say we make a viable and clear threat of force, and if it's not heeded, we actually use it; even over Russian, Chinese or Arabic objections. those countries have enough domestic concerns and shortcomings, to lecture the U.S. and/or get in our way of trying to stop the conflict. remember: fighting in Balkans ended only when force was used against Slobo's forces, showing there's a retribution for every atrocity you commit

Claire
|
New York, USA
March 17, 2009

Claire in New York writes:

I urge Secretary of State Clinton to appoint a special envoy to Darfur, Sundan immediately. We must get Sundan to allow the resumption of humanitarian aid to the displaced persons in Darfur whose lives are even more at risk now.

John
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 17, 2009

John in Washington, DC writes:

The response to the type of brutal, violent oppression that we are seeing in Darfur should be nothing short of a swift and immediate surge in UN forces.

It's quite clear that imposing economic sanctions and installing UN peacekeepers has had a negligible effect on the Sudanese government's actions. Our relative inaction to protect Darfur refugees while we wage a unilaterally-backed war in the Middle East is an apparent sign of our nation's indifference to assist regions where we stand to reap no economic or political benefit.

If we, and the international community as a whole, mean what our diplomats say, UN forces must intervene in greater force. Of course, our pre-exisiting economic and political sanctions against the Sudanese government should stand. However, without a stronger militarized presence, our diplomacy amounts to lip service. In addition, pursuant to the ICC's recent warrant for the arrest of al-Bashir, top Sudanese government leaders responsible for the oppression in Darfur must be brought before the ICC. Finally, humanitarian aid must be sent in full force on the coat tails of the surge of UN forces in order to provide immediate relief to refugees.

Marcia
|
Idaho, USA
March 17, 2009

Marcia in Idaho writes:

1. Full deployment of UNAMID to deliver aid
2. no fly-zone (ban on offensive military flights)
3. Sanctions on senior Sudanese officials and an arms embargo
4. Appointment of a special envoy to Sudan

steven p.
|
New York, USA
March 17, 2009

Steven P. in New York writes:

1. FULL deployment and use of UNAMID to deliver humanitarian aid.

2. No-fly zone (ban on offensive military flights)

3. Sanctions on senior Sudanese officials and an arms embargo

4. Appointment of a special envoy to Sudan

Angela
|
Colorado, USA
March 17, 2009

Angela in Colorado writes:

1. FULL deployment and use of UNAMID to deliver humanitarian aid.

2. No-fly zone (ban on offensive military flights)

3. Sanctions on senior Sudanese officials and an arms embargo

4. Appointment of a special envoy to Sudan

david k.
|
Florida, USA
March 17, 2009

David K. in Florida writes:

1. FULL deployment and use of UNAMID to deliver humanitarian aid.

2. No-fly zone (ban on offensive military flights)

3. Sanctions on senior Sudanese officials and an arms embargo

4. Appointment of a special envoy to Sudan

Leslie
|
California, USA
March 18, 2009

Leslie in California writes:

The administration has thus far fallen significantly short in addressing the current genocide in Darfur, Sudan. Below are a list of strategies that the United Nations, with the driving force of the United States behind it, could pursue:

- Make the peacekeeping force in Darfur, UNAMID, effective by ensuring that it is properly funded.
- Continue the ICC investigation of Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir
- Enhance mulitateral, non-military coercion by increasing targeted sanctions from a broader coalition
- Expand the arms embargo and ensure that there are international monitoring mechanisms
- Enforce the UN's ban on offensive military flights over Darfur
- The United States should appoint a high-level Sudan envoy with senior diplomatsãone responsible for Darfur and one responsible for the Comprehensive Peace Agreement
- The United States should ensure that there are an appropriate amount of foreign service officers for the region
- The United States should invest $250 million for crisis prevention and response
- Create international information-sharing network for preventing genocide
- Create an interagency mechanism within the U.S. government for sharing information and coordinating preventive action.

Richard
|
Florida, USA
March 21, 2009

Richard in Florida writes:

I found this as well as many others blogs asking what actions we should take. My question is what action we should take in our own Country. My father was very sick had 2 strokes, High Blood Pressure, PTSD, and P.A.D.homeless and hungry in a 3rd world county. The U.S. Embassy there while waiting on a repartation loan to flight back to the states. He was told by the Embassy he had to sleep on the streets, and go without food 2 days. To that end when they spoke too me The counslar promised me that he would get my dad medicine, food and a place to stay. Well that did not happen!! The question is why? From what I have research it is the duty of a U.S. Embassy to make sure their fellow countryman are not put in danger. So given the fact that the Embassy was aware of his health why would they allow my father to be treated like a dog or worst than a dog.This took place thei Jan 2009

Chul-hong
|
South Korea
March 19, 2009

Chul-hong in South Korea writes:

As we know, President Obama called the Darfur crisis one "that we care about deeply." Thus, the Darfur crisis is a good chance for U.S. to display its [Diplomacy in Action].

U.S. and United Nations (U.N.) should compel both Ethiopia and China to dissuade the Sudanese government from tyrannizing over its people and to persuade it to accept international aid without precondition.

Ethiopia has strong ties with Sudan in joint security cooperation, development of agriculture projects and border trade. So, Ethiopia could exert influence on Sudan.

China is the biggest foreign investor in Sudan's oil industry. Therefore, China could press Sudan to return from the aberration.

As a last measure, U.N. -- not U.S. -- could consider the military deployment cautiously. In this case, U.S. should not go into the forefront, since the Sudanese problems, not alike Iraq and Afghanistan, are worldwide concerns. U.N. should take the 'formal' initiatives.

Simply put, international community, especially Ethiopia and China, must build the consensus -- humanitarianism is important -- before dealing with the Sudanese situation.

Jan
March 20, 2009

Jan writes:

Do nothing. We have spent billions of dollars in the past to countries around the world, especially Africa, to no avail. Stop wasting our money and use it in this country to help those who have little.

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