Secretary's 2009 International Women of Courage Awards

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
March 12, 2009

Today, Secretary Clinton hosted the 3rd annual International Women of Courage Awards ceremony with guest speaker First Lady Michelle Obama in the Ben Franklin Room at the State Department. Secretary Clinton said:"Our honorees and the hundreds of millions of women they represent not only deserve our respect, they deserve our full support. When we talk about human rights, what I think of are faces like these. What I am committed to is doing everything in my power as Secretary of State to further the work on the ground in countries like those represented here to make changes in peoples’ lives. That doesn’t happen always in the halls of government. It happens day to day in the towns and cities, the villages and countryside where the work of human rights goes on.

We simply cannot solve the global problems confronting us, from a worldwide financial crisis to the risks of climate change to chronic hunger, disease, and poverty that sap the energies and talents of hundreds of millions of people when half the world’s population is left behind. The rights of women – really, of all people – are at the core of these challenges, and human rights will always be central to our foreign policy."

You may read the Secretary's full remarks here.

Comments

Comments

Terry
|
Connecticut, USA
March 12, 2009

Terry in Connecticut writes:

Wow, First Lady Michelle Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the same forum. Great

Rosemary
|
New Jersey, USA
March 12, 2009

Rosemary in New Jersey writes:

Oh Hillary!

This was so beautiful and nice. I love seeing you in the spotlight at State and the way you use the attention to share so generously with others. I know this is not the first year these awards were given, but it is the first time I knew about them -- because of you.

Not only were these special women honored, but, once again my horizons have been broadened because of you. I have worked with international students for many years and am acquainted with many cultures, but there is always something new to learn.

Thank you for sharing this special event so graciously. By the way, your graciousness is an example to which I hold myself. You are a fabulous teacher, and you are doing a fantastic job at State!

Thanks for sharing this.

Wendy
|
California, USA
March 12, 2009

Wendy in California writes:

Hurray Secretary Clinton! Hurray First Lady Mrs. Obama! Hurray noble and brave women! "Enriched and enraged" indeed. So much superb is done and begun. Thank all and each of you for transforming rage into courage.

I wish this extraordinary ceremony could be seen in every classroom in America and around the world. What dreams of girls would be ignited.

Lisa
|
Germany
March 12, 2009

Lisa in Germany writes:

Blessings. I am very proud of you all and thank you for the opportunity to be able to experience this beautiful event.

Rosemary
|
New Jersey, USA
March 12, 2009

Rosemary in New Jersey writes:

@ Wendy in CA -- Wendy, look at that! Just by wishing, you came up with a great suggestion in answer to the question of the week! If every classroom had access to these networks, every little girl (and boy) could see this video. This kind of communication would go a long way toward forming attitudes in the next generation that would allow for the expansion of women's rights.

Way to go, Wendy!

Subra
|
Malaysia
March 13, 2009

Subra in Malaysia writes:

A proud day for mankind in recognising the efforts of these outstanding women. A great honour to all Malaysians to have one of our own among them.

Patrick
|
Maryland, USA
March 13, 2009

Patrick in Maryland writes:

They were very inspiring speech's. I think all 7 women have a lot of courage and hope for the future.

I liked Ambiga Sreenevasan speech,the part about the souls of the nations was very good.I hope they all stay well, and keep working for a better Future.

Cya :)

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 13, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

One would hope such recognition would afford these brave ladies a certain security from retalialation, official or otherwise in their homelands.

I'm glad Sec. Clinton explained to folks why ceremonies like this are a lot more than just pomp and circumstance.

Brooke Spelman- Political Officer at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing posed a thoughtful question in her recent blog entry here, and asked, "Isn't every day women's day?"

I replied, "A smart man would make it so."

(grin)

Not to take the subject lightly, I think I may have hit upon the most comprehensive solution in ten words of common semse or less that was every revealed to be self evident.

Wendy
|
California, USA
March 14, 2009

Wendy in California writes:

@ Rosemary NJ. When I was 39, I saw a press conference with Sally Ride, the first American woman astronaut. I starkly remember thinking, 'Holy moly, I could have been an astronaut.' It had simply NEVER OCCURRED to me until I *saw* her. It made the power of the 'role model' indelible to me.

It's probably a tad late on my becoming a diplomat, but I sure would love all the girls (and boys) in our schools to *see* that the future of global engagement *is* diplomacy.

I'd love State to have semiannual youtube-esque contests for Kid Diplomats where a spokes-kid for a class sends video greetings to a class in another country (& they send theirs too) on How Kids Can Bring Peace to the World, say. Google or Cisco or Microsoft etc would give each participating school a new computer for that class or for their library, say.

Selvanathan.S
|
Malaysia
March 14, 2009

Selvanathan in Malaysia writes:

Congratulations, to this Extraordinate,Remarkable, Nervethrobing, and always Treasured and Remembered.

To, all Winning candidates and of Course a Special MENTION to Dato" Ambiga, from my Proud Country MALAYSIA.

Always Treasured.

SSelvanathan, Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur

Patricia S.
|
New York, USA
March 15, 2009

Patricia S. in New York writes:

Seeing the First Lady and the Secretary of State at the same event was encouraging. But a photo that appeared in The New York Daily News was not encouraging. The First Lady looked like she was put-off while the Secretary of State was at the podium and I hope her look did not speak volumes.

Dr.Shankar
|
Malaysia
March 17, 2009

Shankar in Malaysia writes:

Heartiest congratulations,

to all the winning candidates, with a special mention to our Dato' Ambiga who made each & every Malaysians proud of you & your achievements.

Continue your effort & good work, ladies.

GOD BLESS YOU ALL

Grace
April 18, 2009

Grace writes:

Are you working to get Roxana Saberi out of Iranian prison? You need to get her out. Iran has done this before. Has Iran declared a war against outspoken American women? Do they think they can just grab one and take her and do what they want with her? This unacceptable. Something unconscionable has happened here. You can't let it continue. Please get Roxana out.

Ali G.
|
Texas, USA
June 25, 2009

Ali in Texas writes:

Madam Secretary, I applaud your work. I worked for you campaigning. And I stand ready to work for you again. I ask you to consider putting your considerable weight behind an economic issue that affects women at home. It is a fact that women are not represented in proportion to their numbers. while explanations for this have changed over the history of this county, today's reasons are reflective of today's culture and the problems that we need to address. Women have the right to vote but as you know first hand, the biases and barriers against women to run for elected positions remains. May I suggest ONE important way to effectuate change in that area. We should consider the Nanny Tax as the poll tax for today's women. It should be considered shameful to tax child care annual for monies received above $1400! Think about the hourly wage to make that amount of money per year! Women leaders should support other women standing up to run for political office with genuine solidarity that failure to pay taxes on child care is a brave act of civil disobedience and not a barrier to have their voices heard in order to change the economics of women and the care of their children. It was more than disappointing to recently hear one woman Senator say she and her girlfriends in political office thought back and rejoiced that they were 'smart' back then to have pay their Nanny Tax. How disconnected from the woman who takes care of her nanny when she or her child is ill. How disconnected is that senator from the woman who continues to pay the other woman taking care of her children when the Nanny has cancer, when the Nanny's child is sick, when the Nanny needs blankets, hand-me-downs, etc. Women know how this bartering system works. Taxing for childcare above $28,000 makes sense but it makes sense then for the Nanny to handle her own affairs. We need to think outside the box on this issue. I will begin to write more and more on this until I see the change we need. when we tackle this issue, we should bravely look to see what the other issues are that causes fewer women to run for office. I think you for considering this important issue.

ash
|
Malaysia
August 23, 2009

Ash in Malaysia writes:

congrats to dato' ambiga. ur achievements giv students like me courage to face the world everyday. n tank u to Secretary Clinton for having such an award to honour all the women around the world. a woman honoured is another step to women empowerment. very encouraging.

.

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