What Is the Best Path Forward for Gaza?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 27, 2009
Palestinian Man in Northern Gaza Strip

Secretary Clinton will participate in the donor's conference for Gaza recovery hosted by Egypt on March 2. Special Envoy for Middle East Peace George Mitchell and other high-level representatives will be in attendance with the Secretary, and the U.S. has urged the international community to show similar support for the Egyptian initiative.

The March 2 conference is an opportunity to address the immediate humanitarian suffering in Gaza and support the Palestinian Authority's plan for reconstruction of Gaza as an integral part of a future Palestinian state.

What is the best path forward for Gaza?

Comments

Comments

mike
|
New Hampshire, USA
March 3, 2009

Mike in New Hampshire writes:

Do we really have this kind of cash now for this type of thing? Credibility (with taxpayers) is going to be tough to come by...

"Clinton arrived in Jerusalem Monday evening from the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik, where she pledged $900 million in U.S. aid at an international donors conference for rebuilding the Gaza Strip after Israel's recent offensive against its Hamas rulers".

Bridget
|
China
March 4, 2009

Bridget in China writes:

I have a suggestion. Don't know how feasible it is, but here goes:

Arrange a meeting of 25 Palestinian children/teens and 25 Israeli children/teens. Have them discuss the problems and possible solutions and come up with a plan that all of them agree on.

It's their future. Plus, they may have potential solutions that we as outsiders and adults can't imagine. Also, if a childrens' council crafted a solution, they could bring it back to their families and communities and people might listen past their own strongly-held emotions if there is a united group of kids presenting the ideas instead of "that bad guy on the other side."

It might be a good idea to let them all play together for a week or so first, so they are coming into the discussion as friends and playmates, which might make them eager to find a solution that makes them all happy.

Roger
|
Turkey
March 4, 2009

Roger in Turkey writes:

First of all,The conflict in the Middle East region especially with Israel and Palestinian Authority will never end if the both parties agree upon their existince as two different country. Moreover,Israel should not be reluctant to pursue to withdraw their borders to the first assigned by the United Nations which was in 1948. Thank you.

Jonathan L.
|
New York, USA
March 4, 2009

Jonathan L. in New York writes:

As a U.S. army officer who grew up in Israel, served in Iraq, I understand the cultural issues here. Bottom line, giving money to the Palestinians, under their current system and ongoing corruption is like buying guns, rockets, and mortars for Terrorists. It is irresponsible. We might as well give it to the Iranians, or perhaps Al-Qaeda. Please, Clinton, grow up. You are the administrations biggest mistake.

Syrian P.
|
Syria
March 4, 2009

SNP in Syria writes:

Just reading the comments on this post will give you an idea why this conflict will never ever be solved until a descent leadership arise in the Middle East and force a fair and just solution. Fair wil be something like giving Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria to the Hebrews, kicking the Khazzars and Zionists to New York and Transylvania (it does exists extraterrestially) and handing land from Jordan and Sinai for Palestinians to settle in and finally live in peace.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 4, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Johnathan L. in New York, Thanks for your service to the nation bro...I'd just like say that in all fainess to Sec. Clinton, she flat hasn't had the time yet to become "the administrations biggest mistake", as you put it.

Too busy assuring friends and allies that U.S. foreign policy will retain broad continuity through admin. transition, and wrapping her head around a rather large government agency that she now is in charge of.

In any case, she's got a lot of folks working for her and the President who'll see that they doen't make an uninfomed decision or blindly pilot the good ship America onto the rocks.

As for the steep learning curve involved, I can already see the effect on election rhetoric by the very fact that shortly after the President was sworn in, (and I'm making an educated guess here)...someone no doubt said something like this: "Mr. President, now that you ARE President, there are some things you need to know."

One of this new President's biggest tasks as Commander in Chief is to earn the trust of the rank and file troopers and NCO's under his command that bear the brunt of giving U.S. diplomacy and his foreign policy teeth.

It boils down to folks having each other's backs. Respect and loyalty for the office of the president and our constitution is one thing, trust in the man's judgement is another, and that trust one would hope be shared by the general public, must be earned through deeds.

And as history would show, diplomacy without teeth is a toothless beggar.

Knowing that to take a bite out of terrorism is to create a potential democratic miracle, probability and paradox sometimes mix, for these things in no way resemble a routine surgical procedure to rid a nation of the cancer eating away at society.

We may be able to impose peace, but can't impose democracy. That is taken by the people, for the people, not given to them.

Finally I'd simply say that Abbas is not Arafat, and the only reason Israel is working with him is that the PA has finally gotten with the program, and knows that a two state solution is in the best interests of humanity, not just the Palestinian people.

I can't speak for mankind, but I know I'm sick of being witness to this conflict.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 4, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ SNP, That's the kind of small minded thinking that has perpetuated this conflict for years, rather than coexistance as a mindset folks can actually live with.

Now it seems the U.S. may reinstate an Ambassador to Syria if the political atmosphere is conducive to better U.S.Syrian relations.

In a perfect world, I could see a joint venture to create the conditions of peace with the U.S., Israel, and Syria in resolving the issue of the Golan heights, since we have the tools to move mountains, we could bulldoze this strategic feature of the landscape flat, extend the coastline with the rubble, and create new land to settle in the process.

Needless to say there's some 20,000 folks layed off from Catapillar in the U.S., who would be happy to build the heavy equipment needed for such a project.

This would be a pretty good time I think to explore the possibilities since the contiguous nature of a Palestinian State is an issue.

If the Golan is a problem, no Golan, no problem.

Nations, like individuals, just have to be a little creative in how they go about nation building in general.

Georgiann
|
California, USA
March 4, 2009

Georgiann in California writes:

Humanitarian aid ONLY for both countries. Governments and extremists alike, who wish continue to see this area remain volatile for a variety of reasons, will continue to fuel and fund unrest for time ( seemingly) immortal.

Save the children....for it is they that will remember compassion!

Syrian P.
|
Syria
March 4, 2009

SNP in Syria writes:

Part 1@ Eric in New Mexico, said: --@ SNP, That's the kind of small minded thinking that has perpetuated this conflict for years, rather than coexistance as a mindset folks can actually live with.--

Eric, That is the kind of realistic thinking that no one has the guts, leadership or sound mind to offer, and neither power to force. It shows how little people in America and the World understand the problem. Jews will never abandon Jerusalem as capital of Israel and neither stop settlements in Judea and Samaria. It will never ever happen and no country has power to force them to do so. They did not struggle for 2500 years working hard with Jews all over the world awaiting that day of return, they did not fight all those wars, just to hands out on silver platter what they have always considered their own and longed to have it back, just because a bottle blond or public opinion is going to force them, or convince them to do so.

In order to solve a problem, you need to break it down to its elements, separates those elements in various categories, from solvable to not solvable. You do not try to start with solving the unsolvable, that is what they have tried for 60 years and still peddling the same crappy unsolvable solutions that lead to failure and war after another.

You see, as Syrian Nationalists, we understand that Jews, at least the Hebrew and Israelites have a legitimate right to the land. We question if a Jewish kingdom is ever existed in Palestine, no evidence is ever discovered, it did in Arabia, and we know that David was nothing more than a road robber made into a king in Babylon. We have the history mapped out not based on Ammonite/ Mardukian deceptions but on facts discovered on the ground, or beneath it, to be accurate. One fact stands out, at the time of the Roman invasion of Palestine and Jerusalem; they did destroy a temple and did carry the natives out of the land to all parts of the Roman Empire. Time does not wipe the right of people to return to what they call home, or own land.

The land of Palestine has never been defined in factual, proven history as being the land of a nation called Palestinians, it does provide some evidence that it was occupied by Hebrew speaking nation of tribes.

As to living together, not sure why Israeli should live with Hamas, personally would rather live with Israelis than Palestinians. What do they have to offer other than cheep labor which Israeli did make use of already. Do you know anything about Judaism and Israeli customs and those of Moslem Palestinians? Do you want them to live in country that has a political system like that of Lebanon? Don't the Israeli have trouble already with their mired parties from those that wants to eat pigs to those that wants to outlaw it? They already struggle to form a government now, imaging forming one with coexistence with Palestine's. Anyone that promote coexistence is in fact making a fortune in profit oo stocks of defense companies that keep on selling billions to the Middle east, both sides.

Syrian P.
|
Syria
March 4, 2009

SNP in Syria writes:

Part 2 @ Eric continues: Now it seems the U.S. may reinstate an Ambassador to Syria if the political atmosphere is conducive to better U.S. Syrian relations.

Not sure why we care if there is an Ambassador in Damascus or not. Not sure why Al-Thawra and, Al-Baath newspapers, mouth peace of the government have spent decades calling people like those of our members all kind of nasty names such as IKTAI, RAASMALI, IMPERIALLY, INTIHAZI, Agents of Colonial powers, Agents of America, Ceased our lands and factories, kicked many out of the country and all they doing now is kissing Israeli and American hands, begging for friendship. But that is a separate issue from this topic. What concerns us more than American ambassador presence in Damascus is that we get compensated for stolen properties and lost revenues all those years, That rights are granted back to the people and that our dignity is not being dirtied by coward Syrian army that have no dignity to respond to Israeli attack on our land. Finally, will be happy to celebrate the Golan back to Syria a lot more than we give a dam about some low level, clueless American bureaucrat back in Damascus.

Eric Said - In a perfect world, I could see a joint venture to create the conditions of peace with the U.S., Israel, and Syria in resolving the issue of the Golan heights, since we have the tools to move mountains, we could bulldoze this strategic feature of the landscape flat, extend the coastline with the rubble, and create new land to settle in the process.-

There is a saying in Syria: (tile up the ocean with concrete tiles and drink all its water). Fool MORDAKHAI BIN IBRAHIM BIN MOSHE, AKA the House of Saud with these promises. If he got any cash left he may give it to you.

Eric continues brilliantly -Needless to say there's some 20,000 folks layed off from Catapillar in the U.S., who would be happy to build the heavy equipment needed for such a project.-

The fools at Caterpillars could be hiring 20,000 folks right now to meet the demand for the compressed air electric generator. Their engineers spent hours arguing that it does not work, would like to see the face on those geeks when not only it works, it flies.

Eric said again: -This would be a pretty good time I think to explore the possibilities since the contiguous nature of a Palestinian State is an issue.-

There have been a Palestinian state in existence; it has in fact more International recognition and relations than Syria does nowadays. So what, you think that declaring a state is going to change the Middle East or Israeli-Palestinian relations, it will get far worse and more deadly LOL.

Eric -If the Golan is a problem, no Golan, no problem.-

Why is the Golan a problem, People are the problem, the Golan is just a dirt mount.

Eric best saying so far:- Nations, like individuals, just have to be a little creative in how they go about nation building in general.-

If the leaders have interest and experience in Nation Building. Chiang Kai Chik, Park, George Washington, Ben Gorion, Shah Pahlavi, Ataturk, Peter the Great, Camille Shamoon, Pierre Gemayel, Antoine Saadeh, They had interest in Nations building . They did not ship billions of state money to Swiss and U.K. Banks, they did not fund expensive projects in Africa and South America they invested in own people and country and almost all managed to build a respected, first class countries. They showed respect to own people talents and made sure their countries citizens are always lifting heads up. Even in today fragile Lebanon, despite 30 years of U.S. backed Baathist occupations, horrendous Civil wars, a 5000 strong Shia Majjai mercenaries that is more powerful than the national Lebanese army, one that raked destructive havoc on the country, even worse Israeli wars, Lebanon still stand high with all institutions that was built by the nations builders Chamoon and Gemayel . They loved their country and worked tersely to maintain its sovrignity and independence, its dignity and that of its citizens.

Frank
|
Indiana, USA
March 4, 2009

Frank in Indiana writes:

Time to let Israel take care of Gaza any way it sees fit. The U.S. has no business interfering when a terrist group sends missles into Israel.

John
|
Greece
March 4, 2009

John in Greece writes:

@ SNP -- You write: "We question if a Jewish kingdom is ever existed in Palestine" Can you define Palestine? Because according to Joe in TN:

QUOTE 2. The very history of the Palestinian people is one in which NO bordering country wanted them. They never had a realistic sovereign state to begin with. The idea of such was only to keep them from being incorporated into surounding borders and served individual nationalism. No one wanted them, as the Palestinians have repeatedly shown they will not bend or involve themselves in a productive manner as new citizens. It is the mercy of Israel they were given any land to begin with. Israel, by International law, did not have to honor or recognize Palestine to begin with ... The war was inevitable. END QUOTE.

I really do not know the area, but I think that it's a little bit more complicated than generally referring to a Palestinian "country" (Palestine) without explaining what this really is/"was". I mean the problem for all of us who do not know the "issue" is what "Palestine" is/"was"? I wouldn't have a problem to see a Palestinian country (maybe it's the best solution), but where it starts and where it ends? Can we have a "geographic basis", according to history? I doubt!

And how Palestinians can deal with the idea of a "country" when they are divided in 2?

Arline
|
United States
March 4, 2009

Arline in U.S.A. writes:

We should not be funding Hamas under the guise of rebuilding Gaza. Hamas is committed to the destruction of anything Western and Israel -- they are nothing but a terrorist organization. Americans are suffering at home and should be the recipient of this 900 million.

I DO NOT WANT MY HARD EARNED TAX MONEY TO GO TO TERRORISTS WHO WOULD KILL -- AND HAVE KILLED -- AMERICANS. NO! NO! NO!
-------------------
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Hamas is "very happy" with a pledge this week from the Obama administration to provide $900 million in aid for rebuilding the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, a spokesman from the Islamist organization told WND.

Syrian P.
|
Syria
March 5, 2009

SNP in Syria writes:

@ John in Greece -- Joe's statements are very accurate. This is a very lengthy subject and was covered extensively on other blogs in the past 5 years, with many supporting evidence. You may Google and get the long version. The short of it is that there never really existed any Palestinian State or Nation, not even tribe in history, and neither a Jewish kingdom. Millions of tablet of State archives in the Middle East did not yield any evidence of such entities on both sides. Palestine was called Caanan, the people called Canaanites which included some Lebanese as well. The region was no man land between civilizations; it happened that it is situated on the periphery of Egypt, Aram, and Babylon, Phoenicia, sort of what you call in America county line. The outcast, disfranchised and even criminal elements in those nations took refuge in Caanan. They are made up from all people of the region. The Hebrew were a bunch of tribes that together made up the bulk of the people and have always lived together with hostility to others. The problem worsened when Jewish (called Hexos then) Queen of Egypt Cleopatra committed suicide and her first son smuggled to India and Tibet (he became the legendary Jesus myth). The people ruling with her known as the Hexos before they are known as Jewish (Jewish Pharos Tut Moses is the Moses myth starter) escaped to Caanan (the Exodus) and became the House of Judah, invented Judaism and became at odd with the Canaanite and the Israelite tribes. And life was and is hell ever since for that patch of land.

Forward to the future, and will not discuss the Ammonite/ Mardukian conspiracies facts here that were carried out for 2 millennia's and are at later stage now. Neither can claim to have evidence of exclusivity to all of the land known now as Palestine. In fact, Israeli, even when all the Babylonian introduced wannabe dreams that were passed as history removed from the picture can still prove ownership far more than Palestinians can. Especially when it comes to Jerusalem and Judea-Samaria.

So let's ignore the religious and historical made up stuff of junk and just focus on the issues facing us in 2009. Considering that Palestinian claim to the land is fabled at best. The two societies are simply not compatible to coexist in one state. Coexistence is a Johnny come lately Zionist scam where Palestinian will simply live under the status quo, no state to call own. The 2 state solutions is viable option, but one can understand the apprehension that will arise from it. Excuses that two parts are not viable are just that, Indonesia is made up of some 26000 parts divided by Ocean. A high bridge or underground tunnel like that of the English Channel will connect the 2 parts together. It is not natural to block expansion into Jordan and Sinai, metro areas always expands across state boarders, and in that tight space, you could not have a viable state if all the refugees to come back, you need to expand the land for development and housing etc.

The problem is not geography or landscape, the problem is people, ideologies and security, it is not the landscape that makes people coexist, and people make that happen.

Zharkov
|
United States
March 5, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

So Mrs. Clinton wants us to borrow another $900 million from China to rebuild Gaza so Israel can destroy it again in the next rocket attack?

Of course after that, we have to send more billions of dollars to Israel to compensate for all the money they spent to destroy the newly rebuilt city.

This Israeli scam is better than Bernie Madoff's operation and is only one of several our government has gotten us into.

If we stopped funding both sides in this war, maybe they would want to end the war themselves?

Diane M.
|
New York, USA
March 5, 2009

Diane M. in New York writes:

Article: Question to Clinton: What is a 'sufficient' level of oppression?

link: http://www.mcloughlinpost.com/QuestionToClintonWhatIsASufficientLevelOfO...

Excerpt: 'The best spine Clinton could muster in her meeting with Israeli authorities this week was for her to gently suggest that Israel should permit 'sufficient' humanitarian supplies into Gaza. I, for one, would appreciate it greatly if Secretary of State Clinton could define for us exactly what would meet her fine distinction of 'sufficient'. '

Christen
|
District Of Columbia, USA
March 6, 2009

Christen in Washington, DC writes:

This conflict certainly has become a money pit for all involved. Perhaps that could be a good starting foundation for a new discussion.

I think all sides could agree that waging war, even on the cheap, still has very high costs. Though it will require tact and skill to ensure that what could be common ground does not disintegrate into an argument over who has lost more in the conflict, negotiations must start somewhere.

Another sound commonality is that both sides want peace. Definitions of what peace means and looks like can also be tricky to nail down, but I would encourage the parties to start with an overall goal of not killing or trying to kill people on either side.

Also, though the United States likes to believe religion can be kept separate from state, during Middle East negotiations in his term, President Clinton returned again and again to the Qur'an and the Talmud searching for language both sides could relate to. I urge Secretary Clinton to engage religious leaders on both sides, especially leaders in the mosques of Palestinian areas. This is one situation where we cannot separate religion from the state.

If it cannot be found among each side's leaders, then though I can't believe I'm going to say this because I disagree with his and his "administration's" views on so many other issues, I think Iranian Supreme Leader Khamenei could be right that a "democratic referendum" could be the path to a resolution.

"All those who have a legitimate stake in the territory of Palestine, including Muslims, Christians and Jews, could choose their own system of government in a general referendum," Khamenei said.

Granted, shortly before this quote, the New York Times article also included a quote about how:

"Khamenei criticized Palestinian leaders who have sought a negotiated settlement with Israel, including Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas." By now, those who advocated a 'pragmatic' approach under the illusion of the invincibility of the Zionist regime, and who succumbed to surrender and compromise with the usurpers, should have realized their mistakes," Khamenei said."

I'm not saying this broad-based referendum would be the be all and end all solution, but there are moderates on both sides that could make it a good starting point. It would at least be a different approach. The elected leaders may not find common ground to stand on, but perhaps the people whose daily lives are disrupted and sometimes destroyed by this conflict will be able to agree peace, after so many years of conflict, would be better and lay new groundwork for a path forward.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 6, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ SNP in Syria -- SNP, When two parties have long mistrust of the other's, like Syria and Israel, and one of the points of argument for decades has been over possesion of "a mound of dirt" as you described the Golan, then the problem is finding a creative solution that both parties can live with, at no disadvantage to either party's security or political well being.

Moving mountains is not a ideological excercise, but just one possible way the parties might create a pathway to a more functional relationship between them, as a means to that end to build mutual good relations between them in the best interests of regional stability..

Basicly what I'm suggesting folks do is attempt to turn a point of contention into a basis of cooperative effort to solve a broader common problem affecting both, which is lack of trust and political courage to find a workable solution to resolve all basis of conflict.

Same can be said for SNP's obviously biased ideological vision for the future of the region, and unless the SNP is willing to put these biases aside, along with the past, I believe you will continue to feel marginalized in the process.

Maybe it's just that your political vision lacks "curb appeal" and folks in the region arn't buying the rhetoric SNP's selling. The level of intolerance involved in your statements would be unacceptable to many in any case.

Well, as I see it, your political group has three basic clear cut choices, to be a part of the solution, to be a part of the problem, or simply just get the hell out of the way.

Let us know when you figure it out.

margaret
|
North Carolina, USA
March 7, 2009

Peggy in North Carolina writes:

Dear Secretary, Please do not say that "Israel has the right to defend herself"...Israel does no know how to be proportionate and we look insensitve and pretty stupid to let the tail wag the dog regarding Israel's actions.

Please help the Gazans. Please help their lives be more secure and less oppressive. Please help the Palestinains and tell Israel to stop this occupation..Maybe there would not be "security problems" for Israel if she could show the world how to be nice and respectful to others. Thanks.

shaniqua
|
United States
March 7, 2009

Shaniqua in U.S.A. writes:

The war must end in Irq and the other country we at war with, but we must start doing that by having educateding the people that live in these country how to stand up for themselves and take the power away from the people that are not give the other people their feedoms. Women also are the most important thing becuse without them. The movment can go on.We need our solders show them how so our solders can go home and be free themsleves!

Syrian P.
|
Syria
March 7, 2009

SNP in Syria writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico -- In the age of missiles and other weapons, there is absolutely no strategic value to the Golan that Israel will feel at disadvantaged if lost. The next Middle East war will not be a tank or infantry battle, it will most likely be a nuclear, chemical and biological weapon war, and a very long one, possibly 3-4 years.

How can Syrians trust Israeli when they have repeatedly reneged on Agreements and refused to implement almost each and every United Nation Resolution passed since 1948? How could you cooperate with notorious genocidal in Israel. Look what they did in Gaza. You are asking Syrians to trust Israelis who just few months ago bombed an Animal Shelter and lied to the world to being a Nuclear Reactor. Why for 60 years, after Trillions of Dollars that were spent on weapons, millions died in Iraq and other places, you have nothing to show for except horrifying pictures of genocides, war crimes, refugees and poverty throughout the Middle East, and will be that way for some time because someone is making Billions in profit using your thinking pattern and relying on it to keep the cash flowing.

Oh really, we have master strategist here that figured out the Middle East solution, too bad you aint got a job and authority that you can implement this incredible plan. What is the solution you dreaming of now, or trying to connive unto others. Go peddle it to those concerned, see if they will accept it. Otherwise why don't you get out of the way and stop making profit out murder and mayhem in the Middle East. Leave peace in the Middle East to those that really want to bring peace.

Edith
|
California, USA
March 7, 2009

Edith in California writes:

Lift the blockade,insist on an end to violence (no more Israel raids,home demolitions, targeted assasinations, arrests, etc.) and back it up with stopping U.S. aid. Hamas rockets will stop since their only purpose was to end the blockade. U.S. must recognize Hamas as the legitamate representative of Palestinians and must reverse its disasterous policy of dividing Fatah & Hamas.

The overall policy,of course, should be to end all aid to Israel until it begins to dismantle settlements & begins to adhere to international law. When will we accept the wisdom of the Declaration of Human Rights--recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world?

Jackie
|
California, USA
March 7, 2009

Jackie in California writes:

After watching so many U.S. Presidents try to resolve the problem between Israel/Palestine I now know it's there Leaders that are the problem. Hamas was elected right or wrong by the people. Hillary just step back and look at the big picture of whats right and wrong. Let the Leaders work out there own problems but listen and always let both know what they have in common to build on. Palestine has fights within and Israel is truely messed up. Look at Olmert charged with corruption what does that say about Leadership. Livni wants to wipe Palestine out and Ben Neyhenya is trying to bring back old failed ideas. Even the Israel people are sick of the hate and crimes by these two. Remember the Hatfields and the McCoys who fought so long they forgot what started it. Bill got close but time wasn't on his side. Now Israel had been seen as who they have become which gives level playing field for Palestine. I watched people of both countries living and learning together. It's the young people who have moved on it's the oldies that hold on to the pass. Don't take sides because both have a point. I'm glad you gave help to the Palestine people after they were attacked by Israel. New Leadership would help with this problem just as it's working in the U.S. now. But it's up to the people to make those changes.

I'll keep following this and I'll keep giving my opinion.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 7, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

SNP, Your group has an interesting history, and I guess my assesment of your's (or any group's) three basic choices touched a raw nerve, precicely because the truth hurts sometimes.
---
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_Social_Nationalist_Party

"It was deliberately modeled on Hitler's Nazi Party."
---
You may have dropped the word "socialist", when your group obtained legal status in Syria in 2005, but your group's ideology is modeled after the most prolific genocidal maniac who ever led a government in modern history.

And that's why I say your rhetoric lacks "curb appeal" to the man on the street in your neck of the woods.

Speaking of which, you'll have a hard time convincing anyone that North Koreans came all the way to Syria to build you folks an "animal shelter" in the middle of nowhere, when the Syrian government has already stated that it was a "military installation". Seems the IAEA has more of a clue what's happening in your backyard than you do.

I was also a little suprised to see your unfounded personal attack on my character and insinuations that I somehow profit from the misery of others made it through the moderators of Dipnote, as it openly violates the rules of discussion.

But then the Dipnote staff knows me well enough to know that I handle insult and compliment with equal grace , like water off a duck's back....(chuckle).

If someone officially suggests in the near future that Syria and Israel co-donate the Golan to the proposed Palestinian state, and bulldoze it flat to create land for returning Palestinan refugees to settle on, then my guess would be that folks ran with an idea they found promising.

And credit naturally goes to those that make that decision.

Seeing it become reality would be reward enough for me.

Hamas didn't have to end the ceasefire, didn't have to incite Israeli violence by launching rockets on Israeli citizens, and more to the point, they did so at the urging of Iran to illicit the response Israel promptly rewarded them with.

Note well that my strategic thinking is offered to the US government directly, not to the Israeli government.

If Israel had asked, I would have told them the were being suckered into action they would later regret if the didn't completely remove Hamas. If Abbas cannot stand up a unity government (and I doubt that Hamas will agree to terms), then 3rd party intervention (NATO and the willing) would be in order, since we know what to expect from Israel.

Going back to an earlier post on this thread, I'll repeat what I said here in context to SNP ideology as well, as befitting the history and premis of your group's existance.
---------
"Hamas has become Gaza's latest slum-lord , and thus gives new meaning in my opinion, to the intentionally (posed) iconic photo above , were it to be appropriately captioned, "Fool on a hill.""Master of all he surveys, he sees not that the destruction wrought upon himself was through years of following a failed, dysfunctional, ideological purpose."

You can fool some of the people some of the time, and you can fool some of the people all of the time, but you can't fool all of the people unless you're truly fooling yourself first.

Life is hard, but it's harder when you're being stupid."
------
It's nice to know who you're talking with, but often familiarity breeds contempt, and you leave me with nothing but...

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