How Ought the International Community Engage National Regimes To Transform From Pariahs to Partners?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 6, 2009
Women Raise Their Open Hands in Afghanistan

On February 4, 2009, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns met with P-5+1 counterparts to discuss the approach that the international community will take toward Iran. When asked about Iran, Secretary Clinton said, “Iran has an opportunity to step up and become a productive member of the international community. As President Obama said, we are reaching out a hand, but the fist has to unclench.”

How ought the international community engage national regimes to transform from pariahs to partners?

Comments

Comments

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 8, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Ann in Colorado, I don't think caving in to , or legitimizing Iran's bad behavior by giving them a diplomatic reward for killing our troops in Iraq will get the results the U.S. gov seeks.

Now I do believe in taking a creative approach, so why don't you look at what I posted on Fri Feb 06, 2009 (second post of thread, bottom of page) and tell me if I'm giving the President some sound advice or not.

(chuckle) I'd love a liberal's opinion on "puppy love".

Donald
|
Virginia, USA
February 9, 2009

Donald in Virginia writes:

9 Feb 09

I just found out one of the terrorist responsible for the USS Cole was released. Read this story about the USS Stark. Navy Shipmates is a brotherhood that goes back over 200 years along with the U.S. Marines in this country. My feelings are with those of the family members. All Sailors in the United States Navy will feel the same way once they hear the news! Very Sad and Disgraceful!

Stark was deployed to the Middle East Force in 1984 and 1987. Captain Glenn R. Brindel was the commanding officer during the 1987 deployment. The ship was struck on May 17, 1987, by two Exocet antiship missiles fired from an Iraqi Mirage F1 fighter during the Iran-Iraq War. The fighter had taken off from Shaibah at 20:00 and had flown south into the Persian Gulf. The fighter fired the first Exocet missile from a range of 22.5 nautical miles, and the second from 15.5 nautical miles, at about the time the fighter was given a routine radio warning by the Stark.[1] The frigate did not detect the missiles with radar and warning was given by the lookout only moments before the missiles struck.[2] The first penetrated the port-side hull; it failed to detonate, but spewed flaming rocket fuel in its path. The second entered at almost the same point, and left a 3-by-4-meter gash?then exploded in crew quarters. Thirty-seven sailors were killed and twenty-one were injured.[2]

Stark listing following two hits by Exocet missilesNo weapons were fired in defense of Stark. The Phalanx CIWS remained in standby mode, Mark 36 SRBOC countermeasures were not armed, and the attacking Exocet missiles and Mirage aircraft were in a blindspot of the defensive STIR (Separate Target Illumination Radar) fire control system, preventing use of the ship's Standard missile defenses. The ship failed to maneuver to bring its weapons batteries to bear prior to the first missile impact.[2]

On fire and listing, the frigate was brought under control by its crew during the night. The ship made its way to Bahrain where, after temporary repairs by the tender USS Acadia (AD-42) to make her seaworthy, she returned to her home port of Mayport, Florida, under her own power. The ship was eventually repaired at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Mississippi for $142 million.

A view of external damage to the port sideThe question of whether or not Iraqi leadership authorized the attack is still unanswered. Initial claims by the Iraqi government (that Stark was inside the Iran-Iraq War zone) was shown to be false, so the motives and orders of the pilot remain unanswered. Though American officials claimed he had been executed, an ex-Iraqi Air Force commander since stated that the pilot who attacked Stark was not punished, and was still alive at the time.[3]

Stark was part of the Standing Naval Forces Atlantic Fleet in 1990 before returning to the Middle East Force in 1991. She was attached to UNITAS in 1993 and took part in Operation Support Democracy and Operation Able Vigil in 1994. In 1995, she returned to the Middle East Force before serving in the Atlantic in 1997 and in 1998.

Stark was decommissioned on May 7, 1999. A scrapping contract was awarded to Metro Machine Corp. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 7 October 2005. The ship was reported scrapped on June 21, 2006.[5]

Jonathan
|
South Dakota, USA
February 9, 2009

Jonathan in South Dakota writes:

Iran is a unique case. Their rhetoric indicates that they intend to make their foreign policy a zero sum game over the issue of Israel. The question we have to ask ourselves regarding our relationship with Iran is how "unconditional" is our support for Israel? This is the only question that the current regime will respond to if we take their words at face value.

As for the broader question, of transforming countries from pariahs to partners, there are two options: 1) Negotiate agreements that build upon a foundation of common objectives and incrementally lead to a mutual exchange of values. 2) Determine that the current regime's intentions are mercenary and strive to make their assertions in global politics irrelevant.

The first approach is obviously preferrable but will be ineffective if our foreign policy objective is simply to create good feelings. The agreements must be tangible if they are to be relevent.

If we determine that our tactical, operational and strategic objectives are at odds with the regime, we need to move to isolate this country by seeking to set up broad based regional coalitions who share our concern about the obstinate regime's political objectives. In the case of Iran, this can be accomplished by uniting the wealthy gulf states around a common point of interest, specifically the revival of the region's Babylonian heritage.

The concept is simple: Individuals with enough money to build palm tree islands in the ocean are looking for something meaningful to invest in. Attempting to revive a sense of regional pride in a common cultural apex could create an influx of (regional) foreign investment to the fledgling Iraqi state. Each state with individuals who engage in the project would be materially invested in regional stability and would naturally oppose any regime who seeks to upset the stability.

Linda
|
New York, USA
February 9, 2009

Linda in New York writes:

The Palestinians need to be treated as equals in this discussion. Look at the actual history of Israel's founding. Thousands of Palestinians were driven out of their ancestral villages and out of the country, with no compensation for the land and life they lost. Currently their so-called terroritories are occupied by Israel; the people are not free and Israel has the upper hand. Israel's current racist policy results in genocide and is not working towards a two state solution. Israel's government wants all Arabs out of both Israel and the Palestinian territories. The U.S. must no longer support the international war crimes Israel is committing.

LONNIE C.
|
Virginia, USA
February 9, 2009

Lonnie C. in Virginia writes:

Recommendation: In order to influence other cultures in positive ways we need access. Let's engage the other cultures like Iran and North Korea through sporting events. With this interaction between the two countries we can mitigate our differences through shared sportsmanship.

I fully believe that the average Iranian or North Korean wishes no harm to anyone.

Lastly, we need to pray to God above for wisdom and show love towards our preceived enemies.

ramiro
|
Bolivia
February 9, 2009

Ramiro in Bolivia writes:

I think it is a good approach. Rawls wrote , as a title of one of his books, "International Law :the possible utopia".

I agree: if the foreign policies of the world, States would follow as a guiding principle the norms they themselves have created, ours would be a much better planetarian home. If the "consiglieri" of today's Princes follow that principle , much is to be gained. It is better if the advice of a great power is given not trough words but by means of example:many governments will have a receptive conduct.

Rizwan
|
India
February 10, 2009

Rizwan in India writes:

The Palestinians need to be treated as equals in this discussion. Look at the actual history of Israel's founding. Thousands of Palestinians were driven out of their ancestral villages and out of the country, with no compensation for the land and life they lost. Currently their so-called terroritories are occupied by Israel; the people are not free and Israel has the upper hand. Israel's current racist policy results in genocide and is not working towards a two state solution. Israel's government wants all Arabs out of both Israel and the Palestinian territories. The U.S. must no longer support the international war crimes Israel is committing.

T.J
|
United Kingdom
February 10, 2009

T.J. in the United Kingdom writes:

Dear Eric,

I shall make this simple for all concerned to understand.

I am half English and half Iranian and thus understand both cultures. I may be an asset or a hindrance. It depends which side of fence you are. At times it is not easy for me to define the ultimate right or wrong, but where sanity prevails against the Cult like mentality of ANY religious doctrine, the basic truth about Human Rights comes to my mind.

Let me expand on this issue first, Guantanamo Bay for instance has been highlighted as a double standard of the Western Culture. However, in my opinion, I am for its survival. I truly believe that, those who disregard OUR Human Rights, should forfeit theirs. Sadly it is not easily possible to get the truth out of the Brain washed and there are naturally instances where the good and bad are bunched together.

There is no perfect method, and there is no Utopia yet.

The fact that, the Mullah is branded with the "Made in UK" stamp, although true, but all Iranians must realise -- very fast -- that, if you leave the doors open, you will get burgled. They must STOP putting the blame on the Colonials and put the onus on themselves. If the Snake bites, it is in its nature.

We are really reaping the rewards of Colonial practices. There is struggle going on between those who want to go forward and those who still live in the past. The very far past.

It is not uncommon for us to think that, the Human Race has progressed in many fields, because he has managed to unshackle himself from the bounds of religion. However, the resistance to change is fierce and evident. This is the sleeping Giant.

In order to defeat the Giant, which incidentally is the Constitution of Pariah States, we must understand it completely. This War cannot be won on the battlefield alone. It is the War of minds and cultures.

48 Hours for the Iranian leadership to run to the Mosques. Please NO!! The Mosque is the Pentagon of the Mullah. However, the threat, to the Mullahs existence must remain on the table.

We must help Iranian people break their chains and embrace the Human League once more as they have contributed so much in the past.

Zharkov
|
United States
February 10, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

T.J. in the UK, inquiry to your Iranian half:

1. What kind of help do the Iranian people want to get themselves a government willing to obey a global government?

2. Would bombing the mosques help, or would they prefer random attacks on nuclear facilities?

3. Does it matter which nation bombs them, jews or gentiles, or would they prefer buddists or atheists?

4. Or would it be better to wait and allow the Iranian government to fall on its own initiative after they waste most of their money on the extravagant luxury of nuclear power?

The whole idea here is that someone must do SOMETHING about Iran. We just can't leave Iran alone because someday they might get a nuclear arsenal like Israel has. Nobody knows whether to send cookies or cluster bombs to Iran. So what specifically should we do? Talk them to death?

Georgiann
|
California, USA
February 10, 2009

Georgiann in California writes:

When I am attempting to build a relationship with an individual who has attached a perceived negative label to me, the first thing that I ask is that they [drop] the negative title.

Labels often come with preconceived perceptions, the perceptions themselves often inaccurate. Labels also dehumanize the individual(s),making them things, not people.

Iran is a nation made up of people (not just things), unique and diverse. America is the same (unique and diverse). I am sure that the peoples of both of these nations do not perceive themselves as pariahs or as 'the great evil."

It would benefit all nations, now more than ever, to dispense with name calling, acknowledge our will to serve our people(s) and open dialogue with the understanding that we are nations with different beliefs and political systems. But no matter our differences, we can sit together and talk, without fear of our basic ideological principles being slammed.

It is often difficult for me to understand the ideological principles of other nations. My freedom and devotion to my liberties remains paramount and I honor the system that allows me to live as I do. However, there seems to be billions of others on this planet who live differently than I. Some through choice, others without choice and/or hope.

If the great nation of the United States is unable to retain open dialogues with governments that we disagree with and do not understand, then we remain in grave danger of removing any hope that might benefit that nations people(s).

When someone calls me a name, my first and usual response is to walk away. Rarely if ever have I resorted to the latter two. The second is to insult them as they did me. The third is, if provoked, personal protection at all costs.

REG
|
France
February 10, 2009

REG in France writes:

I am an American residing in Europe. I am registered to vote in Polk County, Florida.

Your question assumes that the United States is not a pariah. That is an erroneous assumption.

The United States had a wonderful relationship with Iran, as long as Iran was ruled by the Shah of Iran, one of the most savage and brutal tyrants of the 20th Century.

The Shah's depravity, conducted on behalf of the United States, easily ranks with that of Adolph Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Joseph Stalin and Pol Pot (Saloth Sar to his friends).

Of course, he was America's puppet tyrant, installed to permit American and British oil companies to steal the wealth of the Iranian people. So, hey, "NO PROBLEM!" as far as the U.S. is concerned. "He may be a monster, but he's OUR monster."

At one time, Iran enjoyed one of the most vibrant and legitimate Democracies in the world. But this Democratic government represented the interests of its people -- a concept abhorrent to the U.S. and the U.K. So, the United States and the United Kingdom overthrew the Democratic government and installed the Shah as their puppet dictator.

So, who's the pariah?

By the way, the reason Iran has a nuclear program is because the United States talked the government into having one, and of course, buying the technology from the United States. Take a look at who filled their pockets on that deal some time. You'll see some familiar names, and some not-familiar names that should be watched, even today.

If the United States truly wants a partnership with those states that it calls "pariahs," a good start would be to stop peddling such a load of hypocrisy.

Having said that, I think the administration of Barack Obama is off to a good start. For the first time in 8 years, there is at least cause for hope that the United States could, one day, become a positive force in the world.

And join the community of civilized nations.

We'll see.

Nuno R.
|
Portugal
February 10, 2009

Nuno R. in Portugal writes:

So, after all this is about Iran? I thought it was about "pariah states" in general...

"Pariah" is the ostracized one, the ugly kid on the block, the one that rejects the external universe, and is rejected by it, etc. etc.

But even "pariahs" have friends (few) and some aacquaintances that are sometimes embarrassed when meeting them.

Let's not forget that, for some, Israel is a pariah. As was Rhodesia. Or pre-PM Tsvangirai Zimbabwe. Or Noriega's Panama. Or -- for Beijing -- Taiwan. Or -- for Taiwan -- China during the "Cultural" Revolution period.

But there are some "technical" pariahs: states that have almost no international relations, only one or two foreign partners/patrons, total secrecy about its inner workings, a fantasy island version of their history, a paranoid view of the world, etc.

Case Study 1, Pariah 101 Class: Spot the pariah state in the map.

Nuno R.

joe
|
Tennessee, USA
February 10, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

Everyone needs to stop beating their chest and drums; much of the world's problems can be seen in individual post herein to be honest.

For REG: Polk County Florida, home of Bernie Little and the Miss Budweiser as well as Publix; once the poorest county in Florida as well as the largest organized southern family run narcotics area in America. I can understand why you moved and have the view of America you do; but, you confuse the Government with corporate interest or greed and the fact you can even be in Europe is because of America. You are defaming the very country which gave you your freedom to be there as well. While I appreciate your freedom to have an opinion, how do you think you, as an American, make your homeland look?

THE POINT BEING:
We all, as human beings have a responsibility to do our best, where ever we are as we are the Ambassadors or our perspective homelands. We reflect what is in actuality, not newspapers, not TV, not blogs, nor broad based historical doctrines. It is all people as citizens who are civilized that respect each other and one day at a time, one handshake, one personal interaction at a time, WE MAKE HISTORY which is only reflected by governments in the long run. If you want to be led, then led you will be. If you want to make a difference, than make that difference and by example be the American that you feel America should be. This is what is, not simply nomenclature and rhetorical negativity. We do not often know everything our leaders premise decisions on; but, we do know what we premise our decisions on. It is here that the difference in the world will take place. One person at a time, one handshake at a time.

For Eric -- Quote: Joe, I've been shot at by professionals, and you'll have to do a lot better than that. END Quote...

Finite math allocated to truth statements when you debate would render a much better responses. There is no legitimate retort I see...The truth is in the tale...

You will note in early past post it clearly states I took an adverse position to get reactions Eric, then would state a stand. I am sorry your situation finds you here daily rather than a class that would be more productive, and to be honest many of the questions you answered herein can be found by your buddy the Col. or Major or whatever officer you have there: Read FM 7-03. If he is Army, he should put you up to date. This is not meant as an insult, but if you are going to invest time as you have here, why not do more research? You can even visit Iran and then tell me all the horrific happenings that exist. Oddly, there are not that many, perhaps less than a complete State by State criminal log daily here in the U.S. In Iran most problems have been caused by their current political situation and are more economic in nature. They are not backwards at all.

Personalization is the last defense of a poor argument, any professional knows that...

Zharkov
|
United States
February 10, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

What constitutes a "pariah state" and how shall we define a "pariah"?

Should "pariah" be a state whose government wants no part of surrendering their national sovereignty to a globalist agenda?

Why should a state become "Pariah" for rejecting U.N. influence?

Are nations now to be governed without their consent?

Can you guess which nation violated or ignored these U.N. resolutions?

Resolution 106
Resolution 111
Resolution 127
Resolution 162
Resolution 171
Resolution 228
Resolution 237
Resolution 242
Resolution 248
Resolution 250
Resolution 251
Resolution 252
Resolution 256
Resolution 259
Resolution 262
Resolution 265
Resolution 267
Resolution 270
Resolution 271
Resolution 279
Resolution 280
Resolution 285
Resolution 298
Resolution 313
Resolution 316
Resolution 317
Resolution 332
Resolution 337
Resolution 347
Resolution 425
Resolution 427
Resolution 444
Resolution 446
Resolution 450
Resolution 452
Resolution 465
Resolution 467
Resolution 468
Resolution 469
Resolution 471
Resolution 476
Resolution 478
Resolution 484
Resolution 487
Resolution 497
Resolution 498
Resolution 501
Resolution 509
Resolution 515
Resolution 517
Resolution 518
Resolution 520
Resolution 573
Resolution 587
Resolution 592
Resolution 605

OK, here is a hint:
Resolution 607: "...'calls' on Israel not to deport Palestinians and strongly requests it to abide by the Fourth Geneva Convention
Resolution 608: "...'deeply regrets' that Israel has defied the United Nations and deported Palestinian civilians"
Resolution 636: "...'deeply regrets' Israeli deportation of Palestinian civilians
Resolution 641: "...'deplores' Israel's continuing deportation of Palestinians
Resolution 672: "...'condemns' Israel for violence against Palestinians at the Haram al-Sharif/Temple Mount
Resolution 673: "...'deplores' Israel's refusal to cooperate with the United Nations
Resolution 681: "...'deplores' Israel's resumption of the deportation of Palestinians
Resolution 694: "...'deplores' Israel's deportation of Palestinians and calls on it to ensure their safe and immediate return
Resolution 726: "...'strongly condemns' Israel's deportation of Palestinians
Resolution 799: "...'strongly condemns' Israel's deportation of 413 Palestinians and calls for their immediate return.

Kyle
|
Florida, USA
February 11, 2009

Kyle in Florida writes:

We should be focusing on what these nations have to offer, not what they have that we don't like. We should be engaging them in a constructive manner, approaching their strengths as strengths and addressing their negatives as opportunities for change, integration and acceptance. We should stop using U.S. acceptance as the sole litmus test of entering the 1st world. We should be approaching the leaders of these nations with the question, "What will it take to get you on board with this, fully?" and work from there, not make a laundry list of changes they have to make before we will even talk to them. We should be partnering with other concerned nations and hosting these countries in townhall or conference style meetings on neutral ground with outside mediators. And the processes should be as transparent as possible to avoid the usual conspiracy theories and meddling by the scandal-media.

Jennifer
|
West Virginia, USA
February 11, 2009

Jennifer in West Virginia writes:

I just wanted to say that the above is a really powerful photo!

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 11, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ T.J. -- Thanks for your clarification, I absolutely agree with this.

"In order to defeat the Giant, which incidentally is the Constitution of Pariah States, we must understand it completely. This War cannot be won on the battlefield alone. It is the War of minds and cultures.

48 Hours for the Iranian leadership to run to the Mosques. Please NO!! The Mosque is the Pentagon of the Mullah. However, the threat, to the Mullahs existence must remain on the table.

We must help Iranian people break their chains and embrace the Human League once more as they have contributed so much in the past."

No doubt they wouldn't go away quietly, but I was thinking more in terms from the fact that not all sects of Shiitte Islam believe in poitical Islam.

In truth, political Islam is mutually self corrupting.

Sure hasn't brought about Khomeni's Utopia.

-----

@ Nuno R. -- Why Iran? Possibly because it represents the greatest "test case" for UN reform.

----

@ Joe -- RE: "Personalization is the last defense of a poor argument, any professional knows that..."

Then why do you persist in engaging in such activity?

Anne
|
District Of Columbia, USA
February 11, 2009

Anne in Washington, DC writes:

Appeal to their Humanity, address their followers and embrace their differences while being proud of our own traits. Great photo.

John
|
Greece
February 11, 2009

John in Greece writes:

@ Eric in NM & Joe in TN (Or), Joe in TN & Eric in NM (I took it alphabetically) --

Personally, (as an amateur, but "sporty" [LOL]) I love your comments. Both!!! Please, don't personalize it. You both offer us "education". Or -- at least, plenty of things and ideas to "think" about in a world that does not offer such intelligent "brain storming(s)".

We need -- we learn from you -- your posts here Sirs. And -- you know better than me -- that smart guys (as the readers in this Blog) don't look for a "winner", but only a thinking vehicle, however not a carrier. You give us life! Please keep on doing this! [chuckle]

Best regards to both of you!!!

John
|
Greece
February 11, 2009

John in Greece writes:

@ Anne in Washington, DC -- Anne you have "some" eye! Great photo indeed!

I have also "travelled" with most of the photos in DipNote. I think that SD should organize a photo exhibition (with front page photos) in N.Y., Boston, or LA? wherever? everywhere...

Just an idea..

Jackie
|
California, USA
February 12, 2009

Jackie in California writes:

Hi Hillary -- I have a deep respect for Iran and his history. Now I agree to disagree but always respect. The Iran President come to the U.S. and was treated with disrespect and I was ashame so I emailed him to apologize and said our country does respect our guest. The Iran President answered me saying he understood and likes America. Now to get your foot in the door just use Universial way we were taught as kids. Respect and Manners while being a good listener and not doing the talking. No body ever agrees with everybody. Young people today are more open to accepting friends around the World. I couldn't believe how Foreign kids listen to rap music and love America. The computer has opened up the U.S. to the World and nothing will change that. It takes time to get someones trust.

I watched you Hillary for 17 years and I trust you but it was hard for me to just openly accept Barack Obama just because he won. He emailed all your supporters and asked us to ask questions and check him out. He accepted it would take time for us to earn his trust and it worked.

America worked with Saddam and there's pictures and weapons to prove it. Our Govenment hasn't always done the right thing in the pass and over the pass 8 years lies were coming out all over. We do owe Iran an apology for accusing them publicly as the Axis of Evil and spreading hate against them around the World. The first step is admitting your wrong and then move forward. No ody likes to admit they did something wrong but a real man/woman will. Trying to push the pass in the pass wont work. We have to deal with it up front before we can move forward. President Obama did so much with his speech as he said he would reach out his hand. I know the Iran Supreme Leader is the ruler of Iran and he watches everything.

My dream one day is to visit Iran and see it's beautiful history and maybe meet the President and the Supreme Leader. I read alot about both men and try to keep up with the Foreign News just to get their take on a topic.

I'll keep watching and following your travels and of course makeing my comments too.

Chul-hong
|
South Korea
February 12, 2009

Chul-hong in South Korea writes:

Basically, the International Community should focus on promoting human rights and democracy that are intrinsic U.S. values, also.

There are two ways in compelling Pariahs to move toward transformation: "Carrot-and-Stick"

In order to deter Pariahs such as Iran and North Korea from retaining nuclear weapons (or devices) threatening its neighboring states respectively, the International Community, first of all, should collaborate in building common sense: If the so-called rouges don't change, then the International Community will engage naturally.

As a means of "Stick," a sea blockade by military coalition or a sort of economic sanctions can be considered.

In case of giving up their unreasonable nuclear ambitions irrevocably, Iran and North Korea can procure what they need, energy or food, as a kind of "Carrot," by the assistance of the International Community.

In conclusion, "Carrot-and-Stick" policy will be preferable and effective in transforming the rouges from Pariahs to Partners.

T.J
|
United Kingdom
February 12, 2009

T.J. in the United Kingdom writes:

Dear Zharkov, Thank you for your input. Please change your tone and remember that, "respect" will reward you with "respect".

In common terminology, I maybe regarded as a "Half Breed". I have no hang ups about this, as my Academic achievements would provide the proof that, I have inherited the best genes.

Next time, if you wish to address me, please remember that, it is NOT possible to win any War without conquering the Hearts and Minds first. I could well be an important player in dealing with the forthcoming challenges. You only know me as T.J

alfredo
|
Florida, USA
February 12, 2009

Alfredo in Florida writes:

I think that we must support the travel of americans to these countries each person for our country that visit their family or friends there take our ideology of freedom and democracy to them and show a better way of live, remember that for example Cuba has more than 50 year without a democratic chang a lot the people there do not know what mean to have the opportunity of have a different opinion and what is a political party. In their campaing to the presidency Mr. Obama made the promise of lift off the travel restrictions of cuban americans to their country and allow them to help with money and goods their familes, there is no law to write is just avoid Mr. Bush Presidential Order. For how long we have to wait to begin this travels of freedom and democracy to the Cuban People?

I want to thanks the opportunity to express my feelings and an ideas to this place.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
February 12, 2009

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ T.J. in the U.K. -- You really never know who reads these things...(chuckle).

So how (beyond the moral support involved), would you propose breaking the Irainian people out of their prison?

After 30 years, and last time I checked some 200,000 political prisoners executed to date, piecemeal protests regularly crushed in brutal fashion, ethnic cleansing of Azari, Ba'hai, Kurds, and other ethnic and religious minorities, is there anyone left to stand up en mass to the regime?

Chris
|
New York, USA
February 12, 2009

Chris in New York writes:

I think the key to engaging "pariah" regimes is to look for areas where cooperation is already possible, and to proceed with that cooperation without demanding concessions in other areas. The areas of cooperation should be driven by U.S. policy, but the offer to cooperate should be sincere and repeated. Limited cooperation in this manner should build up trust and an understanding that the pariah nation could benefit from integration into the current global regime. For example, in the case of Iran, security in the Persian Gulf might be one area where limited cooperation is possible.

Zharkov
|
United States
February 12, 2009

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

Dear T.J. in the U.K. -- When people call Hitler an idiot, I have to agree with them and would never insist anyone show respect for that former Austrian citizen.

Respect is earned by good deeds, but not by American and UK agents overthrowing Iran's government, or Iran holding Americans hostage, or Israel killing children in Palestine, or Arabs killing Israeli children.

The governments involved on all sides of the Iran dispute deserve little respect, perhaps none, for their wasted posturing, threats, and stupid moves. There is absolutely nothing the U.K. government does today in spying and punishing its citizens, cancelling the Magna Charta, etc., that is worthy of even a scintilla of "respect". At this point, citizen respect for governments is in short supply.

If you dislike my post on Israel, perhaps you might drop Tel Aviv a note telling them to obey their masters at the U.N. and stop violating U.N. resolutions. They won't but it's good for a laugh.

As for me, respect on internet blogs is secondary because getting answers to questions far outweights any need for ego stroking by others. There are others willing to sugar-coat their posts, but I think too much sugar is unhealthy.

JOE
|
Tennessee, USA
February 13, 2009

Joe in Tennessee writes:

1. P5+1. or ten LOL..: Perhaps this is one part of the problem when internal political agenda differences within the Security Council exist. When the U.S. pushed the mandates, Russia openly backed Iran on more than one occasion. THERE NEEDS TO BE SETTLEMENT WITHIN THE COUNSIL PURSUENT TO ENFORCEMENT or there is no realistic authority represented.

2. The perspective of the five Perminate members, China, France, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States have no real authority legally by International law; especially in limiting the Nuclear agendas of other countries. By what rights do the few control the many is the real question being asked by smaller nations and realistically so. Why can you have the ability to defend yourself from aggression in this manner and we cannot? How do you justify that legally? It leaves an open ended argument, especially when the U.S. gave WMD to Pakistan. We need to provide a justifialbe answer.

3. http://www.un.org/Docs/sc/annual08_pt2.pdf The scope of the Security Council is much more diverse than perhaps it should be. They have limited resources and we presume too much.

4. Propaganda Methodology is offensive. This is just one example: The UN has a Radio Broadcasting network which throughout 2008 verbally chastised Iran for non recognition of woman rights. This is without the US radio broadcast, which went well beyond that. When you reach out a hand in peace or to negotiate, you should not have a nail in it. It is not the way to do business. Why offend an entire culture to force alteration abruptly? If you insult an existing mass, be it right or wrong, you unify them. As of late, Russian diplomats always commend a culture, regardless of personal feelings; but, keep an eye on the overall picture which is why they have done so well. Change will come, but not by offensive propaganda to the authority that is established and when the fiscal doors open with the International community.

5. There is no Cultural War in reality. There are only differences established in perspective from culture and the histology. The change has begun: http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5ixeFBxfLzaSjs8Mb8cuFmt...

QUOTE: There is mention that he may have been attacked for his views. The Times says Khatami was hustled to safety by bodyguards after stick-waving attackers approached the cleric, shouting: "Death to Khatami. We do not want American government." You note here: the Methodology of our Propaganda efforts lead the people to think that we want to Establish American Government, values, etc to them. Not establish independence of themselves as Iranian citizens. ESTABLISH BETTER COMMUNICATIONS WITH THE PEOPLE.

6. While we are centered on one issue, Iran is moving to establish itself in Iraq and has opened two consulates this week.
If you have interest in following the significance of this placement please go to:
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=Irbil and Sulaymaniyah.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl

Morton
|
Virginia, USA
February 13, 2009

Morton in Virginia writes:

How do I send my thoughts about the U.S. role in the Israel/Palestine peace process?

Al
|
New Jersey, USA
February 16, 2009

Al in New Jersey writes:

Dear Madame Secretary, I searched your website to see if you had made any comments about the abduction and kidnapping of Sean Goldman in Brazil. As you are aware, his father, David Goldman, has been trying for almost 5 years to get his son back. U.S. State Courts have sided with Mr. Goldman. There is an international treaty which the U.S. and Brazil signed. Are we (U.S.A.) just going to be pushed around by another country. Why have you not gone made a public statement about this? You would think that all it would take is one call from the white house. I understand President Lula is coming to the U.S. in March. Maybe you should have his visa revoked and not allowed to enter this country until this resolved amicably. We can not allow governments to sign treaties and the decide to renegotiate the terms because they want to. It does not set a good precedent. Thank you for your efforts in this matter!

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