Does a Decline in Global Status Have a Broader Meaning Aside From National Pride?

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
November 21, 2008
Hands Reach for Globe

This week, the National Intelligence Council (NIC) released Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World, an unclassified report that examines how key global trends might develop over the next 15 years to influence world events. The report outlines a future in which the United States will operate as one of many important players in the world, rather than the sole superpower it has been.

Does a decline in global status have a broader meaning aside from national pride?

Comments

Comments

Ron
|
New York, USA
November 22, 2008

Ron in New York writes:

Yes, Decline in Global Status means that the USA and USG must view its place and role in global affairs from the perspective of lateral-interdependence.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
November 22, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

Last 60 + years America has lifted nations up and now that they are thought of as equals within the family of nations, somehow that translates into a "decline in global status"??

No good deed goes unpunished?

When China takes a walk in space and India probes the Moon, are we to think less of ourselves for having paved the way?

Less an aspect of national pride than a matter of global perspective, for if Humanity is ever to reach for the stars we need to be thinking in terms of the "good ship Terra Firma"

It can't be piloted like a push-me/pull-you if we're to go places.

Gonna have to jetison some ballast...dead weight of global poverty, hunger, disease, all the "-isms" that bind folks to the past and blind them to possibilities, and discover a sense of "we" that trancends soveregnity.

Then "we" as a species may be able to rationally jetison the WMD's from political existance, and at long last become good stewards of the planet.

All this will come about as a result of our increasing awareness of the interconectivity within the world we live upon.

And the instinctual desire to survive.

The little Hitlers of the worlds will do their best to survive sanction and cause as much harship as possible, for that is simply in the nature of tyrants.

Fewer tyrants will come along to replace them, and as the people judge this form of governing Not to be in their best interests, democracy will continue "on a roll" toward replacing totalitarianism.

It will be messy, undiciplined, chaotic, and not at all peaceful in the process of getting there, and I'm looking well beyond 2025 in the finding of the "undiscovered country" called global peace.

But Humanity will find it.

If it be back to sticks and stones.

Edite L.
|
Canada
November 22, 2008

Edite in Canada writes:

With four young grandchildren who will age , be educated, marry, have children one day, the future does not sound terribly bright. What kind of families will exist in that time frame, 2025.?

JOE
|
Tennessee, USA
November 22, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

It would be ignorant to not read the entire publication before posting; however, if this report is indicative of all previous Intelligence documents it will be missing major Game Changers as War or commercial border conflicts as with Russia use of Energy for political purposes.

We have just proven the chain of monetary interactions which would be a new impute calculation would it not?

What was the old one NIC put out on Russia when the wall fell and again in 1995?

IT will take a while to read this, but I'm sure it will be interesting....thank you....see you next week.

Ron
|
New York, USA
November 23, 2008

Ron in New York writes:

Question of the two-terms: If you could have changed anything during the last eight years...what would it be?

Takashi
|
Japan
November 23, 2008

Takashi in Japan writes:

Sorry for interrupting you.

I am strongly interested in the way the United States is engaging with the environment issue.

The media in our country is saying that you are not for the Kyoto, and implicates as if you are trying to make the whole process slower.

However, I read in the State Department's daily press release that you have your own way of engaging with this issue.

I believe the United States is still a strong country and it has to be.

Again, I would like to have some information on the picture of the idea of how the United States is going to engage with the environment issue.

Moshe
|
District Of Columbia, USA
November 24, 2008

Moshe in Washington, DC writes:

A decline in global status is not necessarily a bad thing. The United States has enjoyed the role of global superpower with the ability to sway nations through military, diplomatic, and economic strength. At times, this has worked to our benefit. But, as any economist will tell you, competition breeds ingenuity. With other countries gaining strength, both economically and structurally, innovation will be promoted through better education in the industries that breed change e.g. sciences and engineering. Imagine a world where, for the most part, it is not simply NATO countries with the capability to fly to the moon, find cures for diseases, and use science to improve the efficiency of our everyday life. Having more countries involved will allow for cross fertilization of intelligence and more multilateral decision making in policy. Diversity promotes ingenuity. In truth, the importance of international law will be necessary to allow for innovation. Global allegiances will need to be fortified and diplomacy will be ever more important. There will need to be collaboration, and difficult changes will need to be made by the new international order. But together we can solve some of the world's greatest problems and achieve a better, more pluralistic, society because of the growing strength of other world powers.

Jas
|
California, USA
November 25, 2008

Jas in California writes:

Interesting topic indeed.

A decline in global status has many implications. Global status is earned first however. And the United States has earned its global status not only militarly, but economically, and geographically. The answer to this question varies vastly upon each individuals definition of power and what fortifies global status.

Regardless of how the United States has come to such a status, the nation must find its place in a changing arena where other nations are beginning to take center stage.

Besides national pride lets just examine the obvious. We are in fact in a unipolar world, where the United States is the dominant power. The U.S. has the power to change nations positions, influence them, and alter their policies not just domestically, but also internationally. Now we go into many different aspects and details of so many different areas that would experience some effect as a result of a decline in global status. But that would got lengthy. I will leave it up to the reader to infer what would happen if the U.S. global status falls (even a bit) and think, which resources might get difficult, how might this new competition effect our ability to compete especially if global status has declined? And more so, if the world becomes multi-polar.

Nice dicussion put forth by everyone.

Takashi
|
Japan
November 25, 2008

Takashi in Japan writes:

I just don't understand why you recognize that the United States status in the world has declined.

I think the United States is a great country.

I am not a head or a country, or a diplomat or else, but I stongly think that the world will miss you a lot if you take it that way.

Moshe says that it's military, diplomatic, and economic strength that swayed nations through, but I can't think that it's only that.

Personally, I loved to smoke Marlboro, I loved Budwizer, and above all, I fell in love with your pop and rockn'roll music of the 80's in the early stages of my life, for instance, Journey, Toto, Styx, Van Halen, so on and and on. I loved Lincolns and Chevy Stingrays of the 70's althogh I could never could afford it.

I'm still in love with your country, and I have not come to a conclution whether it is good or bad.

Russell
|
South Carolina, USA
November 25, 2008

Russell in South Carolina writes:

I don't think it's a "decline in global status," rather a sign that other countries are ascending in status and that the world is getting smaller. I believe that we're headed towards a true global community. You'll still have the select few countries that stand a little taller than most but the playing field is slowly beginning to even. If you don't think so, just look at the global markets and see how a decline in one will trigger a decline in others. Look at the eminent transition from petroleum (fossil fuels) to alternative (renewable fuel) sources. Try to count how many articles you read about mass illegal immigration of people into various countries. Pick up a Fortune magazine and try to find a top company listed within it that doesn't have international sales and/or divisions. The time will soon come when we must put the planet first and our individual nations second...

JOE
|
Tennessee, USA
November 25, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

All cultures, all industry, all things need a common bond, a keystone so to speak. I feel what the United States represents from our military might to protect Democracy to the Free Market will continue to keep us a Keystone in the general dynamics of what develops. This is self evident by the recent economic situation. There is no way for anyone to avoid the domino effect when our economy is affected. Our economic system is democratic as well and like our democracy, it is still evolving and adjustments will have to be made. If the Free Market system was taken advantage of, governmental restrictions will have to be put in place to maintain the principles of the interdependence and free trade between nations, without damaging the infrastructure of any Nation. It is the same principle as Common, Civil and Criminal law, no more no less. IE: If we were free to do anything, there would be chaos. To make sure that the ability to pursue happiness is not infringed, we establish laws to govern limitations of behavior. The same premise needs to be applied and we will be able to adjust to continue as a primary player in the world. We are the Hope of the World in every regard.

The report is done by experts in their field and who can argue with them?

The only realistic game changers would be major war in the Middle East, major plague, major natural disasters, or a direct attempt to take over this country by force. The simple capture of Alaska's oil fields by physical military presence would immediately undermine any attempt to strike back at this juncture and as farfetched as that may be, Gates is now checking on this situation as he announced today. We are covered, we are strong, we are America.

America will always be a primary force in the world and I actually see only the fact that no one country will be the primary player; but, only the United States of America is standing strongest for the one thing that every single individual in the world wants: Freedom -- we offer democracy and a military to back it up if necessary -- we just have a few hurdles to get over right now and we should come out stronger than Russia did in much less time.

Takashi
|
Japan
November 26, 2008

Takashi in Japan writes:

Well, I am a little bit sorry if you take it that the United States is only the military or economic power.

My father, in his childhood, had a very heavy bombardment by the B-29s, though, he choose his place in his university, faculty of English, and he also learned Spanish.

Somehow, I lack some economic intelligence. Though, I always read the headline of our domestic economic paper every morning when I have my first puff outdoors. I do know that something irregular is happening on the paper.

In any ways, we are still alive, and we must hope that our future is bright.

John
|
Greece
November 26, 2008

John in Greece writes:

Joe in Tennessee wrote (as always) wonderfully!!! "All cultures, all industry, all things need a common BOND".

But how can we have a common "BAND" when we have not the same idea of what freedom is "everywhere"

Did China censored Guns N'Roses?

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gO0XrOFina3OYZK7Mm9GI...

Just asking...

RANDRIAMAMPIONINA S.
|
Madagascar
November 28, 2008

Solomon in Madagascar writes:

Mr president of the USA, Us high politic and diplomacy have above Intelectial and philosophy. we need careless he all pride for realize benefit for us usa. we need contact he for open new acount ,we suport and help he for building new coperation and expansion the all coperation already us build in all country against and pride of us use for we execution us high politic and diplomacy on econemic and defence, because we are change he wrong moment for renforcement and earning waranty protect and security for us on economic and defence.
Mr president we are the leader and can self-control on economic and defence in the world. Build us defence of peaces in USA. I need apointment of you before 31 december 2008. thank very much. the God us protege your coperation, Solomon

carlos
|
Florida, USA
November 26, 2008

Carlos in Florida writes:

Being the sole superpower (and wielding our super power as we have) has made us the object of resentment for many around the world around the world. If we can continue to enjoy our high standard of living, while being secure from terror and preserving our civil liberties, who cares if we're the sole superpower going forward.

Takashi
|
Japan
November 27, 2008

Takashi in Japan writes:

Thanks, John, on the information. Well, that jacket is despising. Later, give me the information on Velvet Revolver.

Oh no, Carlos, you are not alone. There might be sides, but you are not alone. At least, I hope we will be with you.

Tilley
|
Virginia, USA
November 28, 2008

Tilley in Virginia writes:

It may negate some of the negativity directed towards USA due to the jealousy of our success and influence throughout the globe amongst many. To further support this point those countries who will be rising into more power and influence will not be as benevolent, fairminded and responsible as the US has been (however unappreciated that sometimes seems).

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