Secretary Rice Speaks With The Politico and Yahoo! News

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
August 7, 2008
United Nations Security Council

Full TextFrom DipNote Editors: Yesterday, Secretary Rice spoke with Mike Allen of The Politico and Yahoo! News, and we thought that the DipNote crowd would also like to take a look. Their conversation covered a range of topics, including Iran, Iraq, North Korea, the Olympics, Russia and U.S. foreign policy over the last eight years. Here's the beginning of the interview:QUESTION: Madame Secretary, thank you for sitting down with The Politico and Yahoo! News to talk about your accomplishments, the last eight years, and what lies ahead. You’re one of the few people who’s been along for the whole ride, so we have a lot to talk about.

We’ll start with Iran. A big deadline has passed. They were supposed to tell us if they were going to stop enriching uranium. If they don’t, they could build a bomb. Now what’s the latest on what’s going to happen? We understand that there are some new sanctions that are being considered.

SECRETARY RICE: Well, yesterday, the P5+1, the group that has offered Iran this very generous package but has also demanded that Iran stop its enrichment and reprocessing, the political directors met. They agreed that the Iranian answer is not adequate, that it is not a really serious answer. And so we’re now going to begin to consult on how to get back on the second track, which is to move again toward Security Council – toward a Security Council resolution. We’ve always said Iran has a way out if they ever wish, but we will seriously pursue sanctions if they don’t.

QUESTION: Madame Secretary, the time is running. Both the National Intelligence Estimate and the Israelis have said that at this rate, by 2010, they could have a nuclear weapon. Do you think that the time is coming when sanctions won’t be enough? What other sort of diplomatic, military options might we have to consider?

SECRETARY RICE: Well, the President keeps all of his options on the table, but we still believe that the diplomatic option can work and that there is time for it to work, because not only --

QUESTION: How much time?

SECRETARY RICE: Well, I don’t want to try to get into timelines. The fact is that we’re working at it every day. There is a coalition of states as well as Security Council resolutions that show the Iranians what they have to do. And we have to remember that it’s not just the Security Council resolutions, but a number of other financial measures that the United States, Europe, and others have taken, and a number of companies and banks that have gotten voluntarily out of Iran because of the reputational risk and because of the investment risk. And you have to hope that there are reasonable people in Iran who see this as not the way to run a country.

Read the continuation of the Secretary's interview with Mike Allen of The Politico and Yahoo! News.

Comments

Comments

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 8, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

To Dipnote editors,

The problem with interviews like this is that with a multiple topic format, and just about enough time to either reiterate policy or provide an educated soundbite in answer, the missed opportunities for an in-depth discussion on any given issue is tragic.

The public understanding is only barely adequately served by the results.

The solution?

Madam Secretary might consider posting a topic on Dipnote herself, and saying what she couldn't due to repeated interuption by people from the press too busy thinking of the followup they're going to ask, rather than really taking a pause for thought and listening to the answers she provides before they ask the next question.

Be interesting to see members of the press posting their questions on Dipnote, along with the rest of us and see it becomes a three way interactive discussion between the policy maker, the press, and the public.

It'll be more fun than the "Prime Minister's Question time" in the House of Commons, and in the end I think everyone will appreciate the results because a well informed public is essential to any solution.

Puts everyone on an even, level playing field also...as everyone is limited to the 5000 character limit per post, in either question, opinion, or response.

This is of course only possible on a volunteer basis, assuming the press can handle questions from the public on how they choose to cover an issue....(chuckle).

And assuming there's a spare moment in Dr. Rice's busy day.

I'd add one small caveat that I'm sure the Secretary will appreciate, which is that no one may dare ask her if she'll run for office anytime soon. The moderator would see to it.

(grin).

Syrian P.
|
Syria
August 8, 2008

SNP in Syria writes:

Was Eddie Amin and the other notorious genocidal maniacs that had or have seats at this diabolic Organization attending the meeting as well. Can someone refresh us what did this organization do for all the Trillions it received in the past 50 years other than passing resolutions that directly caused the staving to death of half a million Iraqi infants. This is not the first time Amen/Marduk had a United Nations. In Babylon, the first one established, in fact that is what Babylon means, Gateway of the Assembly of Gods, just like the U.N. Assembly with exact Security Council setup and voting etc.

Joe
|
Tennessee, USA
August 8, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

1. Ms Rice is the only person I know who can discern and redirect journalist who are tying to manipulate her answers to comply with what they want. Amazing intellect.

2. Middle East in General: It will not have any peace until the Saudi's want it and Russia complies.

3. Russia: They got her there. She now knows what someone passed up the line was 100% true and on the mark.. The predictability factor of our leadership is still existent, IE: SECRETARY RICE: A problem. Because it mixes politics and commerce in a way that makes oil and gas an instrument of the state.... on the behavior of these large oil and gas concerns. But you know, there's a downside to that. Many of the predictions now are that Russia's oil production, productivity, is actually going down because they're not receiving the kind of investment in their fields and the ability to recoup old fields that they actually need. And in this sector of the economy, that sector of the economy, oil and gas, and frankly other extractive industries as well -- minerals and the like -- the more that this becomes state owned, operated, and dominated, they're going to continue to have trouble getting investment...

They don't need investments, that is the objective and the slowdown is related more so to provisions to outlying countries and evasion of the International community pressures on holding energy back. It provides viability for their price controls to our Nuclear Umbrella allies who rely on their oil and gas.

You have to realize that Russia does have the raw product for its Steel and new Aluminum acquisitions and is only lacking in labor for the entire growing manufacturing base. The Investments are not as necessary, especially if you are working toward State control. They have been hording Platinum which they mine in Switzerland, have paid their Paris club debut over two years in advance -- why do they need investments? They have assets in every form imaginable that will support a productive State owned group of companies.

4. Throughout the dialogue, you can see there is power given to Russia and China and less to the Untied States for leverage in decision making as with North Korea. Admission of this may well not be in our interest. We are either Strong or Weak in our Allies and enemies eyes.

Quote, Thomas Aquinas: Foresight is the principal of all the parts of prudence, since whatever else is required for prudence, is necessary precisely that some particular thing may be rightly directed to its end.

?? we need to get everyone back in the field again who can walk.

Zharkov
|
United States
August 8, 2008

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

Secretary Rice said "Well, the President keeps all of his options on the table, but we still believe that the diplomatic option can work and that there is time for it to work..."

This is somewhat misleading. Israel holds all the options because Israeli officials know that they attack Iran, the US automatically will protect Israel from military retaliation, therefore, Israel holds all the options today.

The president has a few options available until the time that Israel attacks Iran and at that point, the president has no options at all except to join the battle to minimize Israeli losses. Israel's unmatched influence in Congress will ensure US military participation.

Probably most Middle Eastern "oil royals" have already approved an attack on Iran and all that remains is the timing -- before or after U.N. resolutions occur -- when the Israeli military command feels fully prepared militarily and politically for war with Iran.

Russia's public has been successfully refocused on terrorism in South Ossetia and fighting with Georgia, so that event relieves any conceivable public pressure on the Russian government to assist Iran. After UNSC efforts fail, an Israeli attack on Iran is certain.

Reverend A.
|
Ohio, USA
August 12, 2008

Anthony in Ohio writes:

Oh Just Great.

Soon Isreal will have to strike at Iran's nuclear development facilities and no one is even trying to push back the time line established by the Isrealis based upon the delivery of the Russian ss-300 anti aircraft missile systems.

Well here is what has to be done.

1. The Sec. of State Ms . Rice ought to get the Russians to delay or end their delivery of the ss-300 missile system to Iran in exchange for Israel ending their support of the rebel forces in Georgia.

This is a time sensitive issue in that Israel is set to strike at the Iranian nuclear enrichment facilities before the installment of the ss-300 missile system, so she has 3 months to figure out what to do here.

Joe
|
Tennessee, USA
August 12, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

Ms Rice:

Russia relationship:

Iran has a 300km torpedo now. Who do you think gave them that? Funny, Russia developed done about two years ago or so?

Russia is simply flexing its muscle and what are we going to do in reality, or anyone else? The Georgian peninsula has a great deal of oil as well?and gosh, BP is closing two pipe lines today for what? This gives Russia more control over world wide oil prices via proxy? That simply adds to its projected power: you look weak or strong to your allies or enimies...

The problem is the Nuclear Umbrella and NATO surrounding Russia....that is the crux of it all...the rest is smoke, BS and politics.

The table has been reset and the game commences....

Truth be told: In the greater scheme of things, Russia needs us, we need them; but, don't think for a minuite they will not devour us if possible.

JOE
|
Tennessee, USA
August 15, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

RUSSIA...

Like I said, I was buried and burned, just like the reports from Moscow...

Proof is in the pudding unless I am psychic...shame on you all.

Richard
|
North Carolina, USA
August 15, 2008

Richard in North Carolina writes:

Everyone is talking about the crisis in Georgia. What would the United States have done if there was a threat in this hemisphere under a George Herbert Bush presidency.

JOE
|
Tennessee, USA
August 15, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

1. There would not be an Iran/Iraq/Afghanistan situation for one thing, which would have led to us not having a premise of economic suffrage for Russia to use.

2. Given the present situation, what can we do? They own 1/3 of our National Debt...we can default I guess...LOL! Oh, we will not hold the Olympics there six years from now. I'm sure that is worth more than the oil and ports of Georgia.

3. What is Europe going to do about it? Italy makes the SU-30 fuselages, Germany has economic ties, France ordered its new Reactor from them and a petty ongoing bank dispute...give it a rest. There are no realistic economic restrictions that can be applied.

4. Personally, as upset as it made me initially, there must be some International understanding and agreement made. Why?
A) It has not affected the Stock Market here. Why didn't it plummet?
B) Petrol prices lowered, not raised and with the threat of an International dispute? So corporate politics is aware of something the press is not.
C) There is no way the US and NATO did not see the tank movements to begin with. They could not have moved that much hardware overnight...LOL!

5. Seems to me poor old Georgia has been sold out prior to the invasion with some good old fashioned politics. Little guy gets the shaft as usual
What would GH do? GH would not have let it happen to begin with...had Congress initiated a war long ago.
This is not GWs fault...and it is multi sided in a larger sense. If someone kept putting missiles around your country and said they were your friend it seems suspicious.

What this does is give Russia dominance and recognized power. Put the missiles there so they will not advance on democratic countriesãwell, we will see about that.

You have to admit, it is a good move on the Russian part. What is the counter move?

The only real flaw is that the U.S. trusted the same young Economics major who helped get us off the Gold Standard to begin with in just three weeks. Some people do put their country before money...why do we keep forgetting that?

The Institute of Global Economics: Russia will not be a major economic or military power before the year 2050 or latter. Yeah, realy smart guys...and these are the same people responsible for the loss of over 1/3 of the free worlds jobs.

That is not politics, just fact.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 17, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Joe in Tennessee -- Joe, speaking of debt (and it would be nice of you to provide sources for your "factoids" regarding Russia), I'm wondering if Stalin ever payed us back for all the lend-lease aid (I think in WW2 dollars it was some 14 billion) that allowed Russia to survive Hitler's invasion.

What's 60 + years of compounded interest + penalties on that amount?

Probably right around 1/3 of our national debt.

Default? Russia owes the US its very existance for what we did for them in WW2, perhaps they should be reminded of that fact.

On the flip side, what do you think will happen to Russia's economy when the EU finds reason to sever trade relations with Russia and go to other sources for energy needs no matter how inconvenient that may be for the EU in the short term?

I think there's more leverage than you realize.

Joe
|
Tennessee, USA
August 17, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

Russia owes the US its very existence for what we did for them in WW2, perhaps they should be reminded of that fact."

China and Russia combined DO OWN 2/3 of our National Debut..

What are you talking about...we owe Russia actually ...

1. If you are talking about a Time, troop involvement that led to the end of the war. Russia bleed Germany slowly...

2. How much sooner would the U.S. have involved itself in the war without Germany's economic investments in America?

3. We forgave the debuts..what fiscal documents do you have showing we owe them anything?

You cannot blame Russia for Americas poor judgement and lack of discipline. Putin put Nationalism and the rebuilding of Russia above Money...Money was only a tool..rather odd is it not as that is Biblical...Putin did not let GREED control his countries rebuilding.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
August 25, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

What's so hard about citing a source I can fact check, Joe?

Otherwise I just have no reason to take you at your word, regarding what, if anything we owe to either nation.

The Russians owe us a moral debt, they owe us their thanks rather than continuing to be idiots about the kind of bilateral relations that would better serve humanity's interests.

They haven't figured out apparently that they are becoming their own worst enemy.

The EU is set next week to discuss economic relations with Russia in light of the Georgian crisis.

As I asked you, What do you think is going to happen to Russia's economy when the EU refuses to buy a drop of oil or natural gas from them?

As Sarkozy said, "serious consequences" will be forthcoming unless Russia fully complies with the ceasefire agreement.

This is not a fight the Russians can win, or negotiate their way out of. They must first comply to avoid the consequences.

.

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