U.S. Embassy in Belgrade Attacked

Posted by DipNote Bloggers
February 22, 2008
U.S. Embassy in Belgrade Attack

Given the graphic images of the recent attack on the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade, Serbia, thankfully all embassy personnel are safe and accounted for. At the request of the Ambassador, all family members and non-essential embassy personnel were ordered Friday afternoon to leave Serbia. They will be taken to another country in the region until it is deemed safe for them to return to Belgrade.

Secretary Rice (Feb. 22):"The Serb Government ...had an obligation to protect diplomatic missions and from what we can tell, the police presence was either inadequate or unresponsive at the time."

More information...

The Situation At U.S. Embassy Belgrade (02/21/2008) | View VideoDaily Press Briefing (02/21/2008) | View Video

Comments

Comments

JOE89
|
Tennessee, USA
March 1, 2008

Joe in Tennessee writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A. --

"Joe, I get my information from open source documents that anyone could find if they care to do the research. Here's an article from Michel Chossudovsky, 23 February 2008: The decision to destroy Yugoslavia as a country and carve it up into a number of small proxy states was taken by Reagan administration in the early 1980s."

You need a more formal education in history and reading biased opinions will only result in non objective views, which in print may seem correct, but twisted to suit the perspective of the editor.

1. Reagan was not as intelligent as you may think. Were not for GW Bush Sr, there would not have been a Reagan administration at all. Nixon was intelligent, Reagan was not. If anything an example of the Peters Principle going the wrong way and his support base carried him. He was an actor and wonder front man for an entire administration of exceptional personal, no more, no less. He was one of the most inflexible decision makers ever to sit in office since Teddy Roosevelt when he did make decisions, personal and other wise. History during this period of the United States prompted Gore Vidal to say: History in America is more half truth and lies that the administration or leadership at any given period of time would prefer you to believe.

2. Regarding the NSA proposed report: There are formats for all possibilities on the table for all countries. Pre and post elections are important for that reason as well as economics as impute probability factors. For the directive you view, there are at least ten other variables with projected outcomes which include everything from age life expectancy, education levels affected, economic to cultural changes. The variety of impute functions which go into these formulation is rather complex. So, just ONE NSA directive has many variables which are included. You are only indexing one of many regarding the country. So, you are correct only in plausibility, not fact.

3. Please go to wikipedia and view the history of Yugoslavia in a basic format to understand the infighting and divisions of the peoples to begin with that predate any outside involvements historically regarding the Serbian population. You should find the Ethnic tensions and the economic crisis section more in line with actuality. If you want to blame anyone it was all Nations who did not force Russia to honor the Malta agreement after WWII. It should have been a forced issue and one reason General Patton wanted to go after Russia; but politically America was tired of war and Germany was defeated. You think Tito was a wonderful guy, a great leader? Put blame where it belongs.

4. We never invaded Yugoslavia in any manner historically, but with the trimming of the cold war had to have all plausible possibilities listed. You seem to forget, proximity and relations with the old KGB could lead to the possibility that WMD would or could still be there and used by any possibility.

5. I think you need to learn to use open text in a more formal manner to find a logic matrix to develop a better understanding of what it printed. You need many views historically and modern to have a decent probability of truth.

If I want Russian news, I do not simply go to Russian and see what they say, I go to all neighboring countries as well including All those with economic relationships pending etc. Money is still a key denominator.

The world needs a good and evil basis to work from and the actual truth is: You can not have one without the other and: It is better to have two major adversarial powers than 100 varied powers. It keeps us all alive.

Zharkov
|
United States
March 1, 2008

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

While Washington had officially designated the KLA a "terrorist organization" funded by the heroin trade, the Clinton administration was hypocritically complicit with their German allies in the division of the Serb province along ethnic and religious lines.

By 1998, the KLA took control of between 25 to 40 percent of the province before Serb forces wrested the KLA-held areas back. Facing imminent defeat, the Kosovo Liberation Army and allied Al-Qaida mujahideen fighters appealed to Washington, citing the imminent danger of "ethnic cleansing" by the Serbs. Laughable on the face of it, Albanians constitute fully 90 percent of Kosovoãs population, and in fact, it was the Serbs, Roma and Jews who were being brutalized by KLA hit squads, their homes torched, their churches and synagogues sacked. It was the dismantling of the KLAãs terrorist infrastructure by the Yugoslav Peopleãs Army that was the trigger that prompted direct military intervention by NATO in 1999.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 3, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Joe in Tennessee -- "Reagan was not as intelligent as you may think."

I dunno Joe, If you want a discerning democrat's opinion about that, I'd say telling Gorbachev to "Tear down this wall!" was one of the most effective statements of all time.

Takes a fairly smart fellow to push the right buttons to get results.

Nobody
|
Pakistan
March 3, 2008

NB in Pakistan writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A. -- Mar-01-2008 posting. If something doesn't make sense, it is rejected by the reasoning mind no matter how one twists the story. I, for one, cannot accept that the Israelite lobby in U.S.A. would have sat silently if the Kosovians had been involved in atrocities against the Israelite people or their religious places. I also cannot accept that any U.S. administration could have collaborated with any terrorist organization let alone Al-Qaida.

@ Eric in New Mexico -- Mar-01-2008 posting. I could translate it,yes. To have it delivered to North Waziristan is like asking me to commit suicide. I know you're joking but I do agree that the prevailing mentality and the situation in entire Waziristan is beyond understanding. There too, educating the tribal elders could achieve a lot but the question is who's going to stick out his neck. Having said this, however, the U.S. is doing just that and I believe is running several development programs in Waziristan. Yes, it requires courage and concern more humanity to do that and the U.S. administration is showing both of it.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 4, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

"I could translate it,yes. To have it delivered to North Waziristan is like asking me to commit suicide. I know you're joking but I do agree that the prevailing mentality and the situation in entire Waziristan is beyond understanding."

Well, I wouldn't want you to go to great risk to deliver it, but if it were possible to send it by snail mail, I'd hope the tribal elders would eventually pass it on to Bin Laden, may he choke to death upon reading the truth.

Zharkov
|
United States
March 4, 2008

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

Perhaps it is startling news to Joe in Tennesee and Eric in New Mexico that much of written history is a matter of opinion? Did you know that Mexico's school books tell a different story of Texas history than does America's school books? North Vietnam sees history differently from France and America? Even U.S. government officials see history differently from everyone else.

Were the Pentagon Papers a conspiracy theory or actual history?

How about the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution - based on fact or fiction?

Do you still believe Pat Tillman was killed by enemy fire in Afghanistan or was that a lie?

Do you believe, as the Pentagon initially claimed, that nothing happened at Abu Ghraib?

If photos of Abu Ghraib were kept secret, would the Pentagon would still deny today that it happened.

Do you believe it is some wild conspiracy theory that the CIA once allied itself with Osama bin Laden and supplied arms to his mujahideen? Do you know why bin Laden turned against America?

If you don't care about what your government does, are you no different from sheep, with dogs to lead you.

The problem with our government is that it cannot tell the truth to the public about what it is actually doing and why. Why does a former NATO commander say the attack on Serbia was a mistake? You don't know, and you will never know because you don't believe him and won't read what he wrote. I call it the "Ostrich Effect" - when the truth is so terrible that it must be denied.

Nobody
|
Pakistan
March 4, 2008

NB in Pakistan writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico -- Mar-01-2008 posting. I would like to add to my comments of Mar-02-2008. Yes, the prevailing situation in Waziristan is rotten and it's spreading into NWFP province of Pakistan and it has international implications too. The government of Pakistan ought to be more proactive in its efforts to bring some sense into the tribal elders instead of just being content with the efforts of the U.S. Administration. The government of Pakistan did try the old method of Jirga but failed miserably. I think it's basically the Jirga system that keeps the thinking of the tribal elders in the stone-age. There are things the government of Pakistan could do, like giving Waziristan a proper provincial status, training a police force constituted of educated younger generation and implementing the Law of the Land, i.e. the federal laws of Pakistan. I think by involving the educated younger generation the Jirga system could gradually fade away. Things cannot be put right overnight but at least a start in the right direction might eventually bring in the desired results. Just wanted to add this bit to my comments in which I had meant my individual capacity. Take care.

Nobody
|
Pakistan
March 5, 2008

NB in Pakistan writes:

@ Eric in New Mexico -- Mar-03-2008 posting. I would say "Amen" to that.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 5, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ Zharkov in U.S.A. --

"Perhaps it is startling news to Joe in Tennessee and Eric in New Mexico that much of written history is a matter of opinion?"

Well Zharkov. I always believed that when Shakespeare wrote that "All the world's a stage, and all the people in it, players." that he forgot to add that all the world's an audience as well, and all the people in it, critics. Pathetic indeed in my honest opinion, that so few offer constructive solution to their complaint.

As to your subjective and revisionist opinion of history in general, my solution is to let you fondle your illusions in peace because dwelling in the past is mostly for those who care not for seeking a better future.

And whether it be individual, nation, or humanity itself...when stumbling across the truth, one eventually manages to pick themselves up and carry on. ( to paraphrase a man who reinvented himself many times.)

People do the strangest things, and I can't help but see it as being inherent in the dualistic nature of the universe we live in. Paradox abounds and there is no evil without the good in balance. Which is why I offered the thought I did to folks in Serbia and Kosovo I believe it applies to many circumstance.

I believe the US has been, and continues to be at risk of being manipulated into action that will potentially give rise to the largest mass religious manipulation of people in history. Let the world become aware of the manipulation, and watch as Islam takes a good look at itself.
And it is. It can because most of the world's Muslims live in democracies.

If you wish to defend the idiot who tried unsuccessfully to initiate a holy war Zharkov, go for it. It should be quite entertaining reading, as always.

Zharkov
|
United States
March 5, 2008

Zharkov in U.S.A. writes:

Serbs are not indians willing to trade their land for smallpox-laden blankets and a few bottles of liquor. As the indians discovered to their great misfortune, the U.S. government cannot be trusted to keep promises, and a promise was made not to divide Serbia. The true motives behind the war on Serbia and Kosovo independence are buried in plausible excuses to pacify our taxpayers. What you could know, if you care to read about it, is that a former NATO commander in the Balkans said NATO, and America, helped the wrong side in the Serb war.

The latest conspirators to negligently stumble into a future Balkan war are the United States and the European Union, which have rushed in to recognize what Serbian Prime Minister Vojislav Kostunica rightly calls the "fake state of Kosovo." Why is it a fake state? Because there are no Kosovars, only Serbs and Albanians. Each group seeks to unite Kosovo with its homeland, historic Serbia or Greater Albania. An independent Kosovo has the half-life of a sub-atomic particle.

The action of the U.S. and the EU in stripping Serbia of Serbs' historic homeland is both a crime and a blunder. It is a crime, first, because the EU, NATO, and the UN, have no legal right to either create, dismember, or partition a sovereign state, and second, because the narrative used to justify the illegal action is a lie. The stated justification is that the Serbs, under Slobodan Milosevic, were ethnically cleansing Kosovo of Albanians. As German courts have established, there was no ethnic cleansing of Albanians in Kosovo until NATO started bombing Serbia. After NATO launched its unprovoked attack on Serbia (Mrs. Albright's splendid little war), the Serbs dumped the Albanians on NATO's doorstep as a vast logistics sponge. That wasn't terribly nice, but when you are a very small country fighting all of NATO, you do what you can. Ironically, after Serbia was forced to capitulate when Russia withdrew her support, NATO blithely presided over the ethnic cleansing of two-thirds of Kosovo's Serbs by the Albanians.

As your neighbors cannot legally agree to give away half of your land without your consent, the EU, NATO, and the UN have no ownership interest to give away part of Serbia without its consent. The UN has no right of eminent domain, nor could it have such a right, because the UN is not a sovereign nation. Under international law, the unlawful dismemberment of a nation could be a crime of genocide - the intentional dismemberment of a sovereign state resulting in relocation of a portion of its population, and under the rules established at Nuremburg, leaders of organizations participating in this crime could be prosecuted. Serbia will never accept the wholesale alienation of one of her provinces. Like France after 1871, her whole policy will focus on recovering her lost territory as soon as the moment is ripe.

Unchosen, mandatory obligations are state slavery, which should be obvious because the obligations are not chosen. In claiming or bestowing unchosen positive obligations onto other people, it is the demanding authorities who must face a burden of proof. The organization which claims that others have unchosen positive obligations to them is the one who must prove that others owe some kind of duty to them. In the absence of any objectively definable duty previously owed, the claim is false and fraudulent. To claim an abstract positive right to the labor of others, or to their land, is to claim authority over them by definition. Yet the UN, NATO, and the EU have no legal authority over Serbia. Someone who must fulfill unchosen positive obligations is engaging in involuntary servitude. Involuntary servitude is slavery and slavery is undemocratic. Forcing Serbia's government, at gunpoint, to participate in the loss of her territory is as undemocratic as armed robbery and a horrible precedent for the future.

The second blunder is further alienating Russia, this time in a way she cannot ignore. If the U.S. and the E.U. are blind to the ghost of 1914, Russia and Serbia are not. The fact that Russia went to war to protect Serbia then, puts pressure on Moscow to do so again, lest the Russian government look weak domestically as well as abroad. Yet even with Russian acquiescence, the legal objections remain - Kosovo remains Serbia until all Serb people, or their elected representatives, vote otherwise. To foolishly declare that Kosovo will never be Serbia is to assume authority which does not exist anywhere except in the Serbian people themselves.

Eric
|
New Mexico, USA
March 10, 2008

Eric in New Mexico writes:

@ NB in Pakistan -- In some ways, one may draw a relative parallel between the re-drawn borders in what was known Yugoslavia, and the potential in 2012 when the Durand line becomes an issue to re-negotiate between Afghanistan and Pakistan, parties not signatory the original treaty, but subject to its implementation last century.

I could forsee an eventual solution wherein Warizstan is recognized as an independant province of both countries, with the appropriate representation in both the Afghan Loya Jirga, and Pakistan's version of a representitive government structure.

That should solve any nationalistic claims to the area, as well as creating the structured independence of the region in a more federalized regional arrangement between nations. Giving the local folks the say in their own affairs within the regional context in all aspects is essential to a successful democratic system. It is rightly said that all politics is local for that reason.

Otherwise I believe this long-standing issue will continue to fester to the detriment of all concerned, except al quaida of course who found an ideal breading ground of resentment and called it home.

Best regards.

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